robertogreco + ar   67

EyeMyth
"Exploring present and future cases of immersive storytelling and new media, EyeMyth brings together pioneering artists, performers and experts at the forefront of these fields. 

EyeMyth’s 2017 edition, Future As Fiction, traversed multiple locations in Mumbai to create, discover and engage with new elements in the digital space. The festival featured an array of exhibitions, workshops and performances that explored various forms of expression through new media."

[via: "Cool to see our comrades in Mumbai doing strange and interesting things in the futures/fiction/festival space: https://eyemyth.unboxfestival.com/ "
https://twitter.com/justinpickard/status/914105328266022912 ]
mumbai  designfiction  speculativefiction  future  futurism  storytelling  newmedia  technology  vr  ar  augmentedreality 
september 2017 by robertogreco
things weren't better then, they just spent less time nostalgic for the past
"Have you seen Peter Gabriel’s Sledgehammer lately? It popped up when something else I was playing on Youtube ended and I can’t stop thinking about it. Now I want to send it to every VR guy who says something like, “well, actually it took fifty years of film before Citizen Kane..” Well, actually it took four years of MTV before they made this:

[image]

Why isn’t VR as good as music videos were in the 80s? This week people went wild over an AR recreation of A-ha's “Take on me.” It’s a technical achievement but not a creative one. A creative achievement would be to this moment what “Take on me” was in 1984. Something doesn’t need to be technically advanced to capture people’s imaginations as that video did, but I don’t see any entry points in the industry or attempts to nurture that kind of talent. 

VR/AR is ad-tech. Everything built in studios (except for experimental projects from independent artists) is advertising something. That empathy stuff? That's advertising for nonprofits. But mostly VR is advertising itself. While MTV was advertising musicians, the scale and creative freedom meant that it launched careers for people like Michel Gondry, Antoine Fuqua, David Fincher, Spike Jonze, Jonathan Dayton and Valerie Faris, etc. A band from a town like Louisville or Tampa could get in touch with a local filmmaker and collaborate on a project and hope that 120 Minutes picks it up. There were entry points like that. And the audience was eager to see something experimental. But a VR audience is primed to have something like a rollercoaster experience, rather than an encounter with the unexpected. The same slimy shapeshifter entrepreneurs that could just as well build martech or chatbots went and colonized the VR space because they have a built in excuse that it took film "fifty years before Orson Wells." Imagine that. A blank check and a deadline in fifty years.

No one wants to get inside some sweaty uncomfortable headset unless they are going to be rewarded with something at least as good as music videos were in 1984. But who is ushering in talent rather than hype? VR is starting as an institutional and commercial monster rather than scaling into institutional power. It’s like if the art market came before art."
joannemcneil  2017  vr  ar  virtualreality  augmentedreality  mtv  musicvideos  art  advertising  michelgondry  spikejonze  antoinefuqua  davidflincher  jonathandayton  valeriefaris  experimentation  unexpected  surprise  creativity  artmarket 
july 2017 by robertogreco
elevr
"Hello, World! We are eleVR [el-uh-V-R], a research team that includes Vi Hart, Andrea Hawksley, M Eifler, Elijah Butterfield, and Evelyn Eastmond.

We study and experiment with immersive media, particularly virtual and augmented reality, as a tool to reveal new ways to understand our world and express ourselves within it.

Our research practice is formatted as a series of experimental projects accompanied by write-ups of findings and analysis on our blog and projects page, all available creative commons and open source.

Our first major theme involved immersive video capture and production, from theoretical VR camera designs to actual camera prototypes, filming hundreds of videos, creating new filming, editing, and post-production techniques, and expanding media theory.

We’re also big into webVR and the future of the immersive web, creating the first spherical video player for webVR back in 2014 (the eleVR player), and constantly experimenting with new webVR interfaces and content techniques.

Another major theme involves using the potential of VR and AR technology for augmented understanding. We’re experimenting with new ways to explore mathematical concepts like four-dimensional symmetry groups, hyperbolic geometry, and derivatives. In addition to the powerful visualizations enabled by 3D explorable spaces, we are looking for places where VR and AR tracking technology can let us use our own body knowledge and real-time feedback to understand things we couldn’t understand before. We’re also looking at the philosophical implications of how new technology will change our understanding of ourselves and our experience of reality.

Our latest theme is creating hybrid spaces that mix the virtual and the real. We mix real and virtual objects, layer real and virtual spaces, and explore real and virtual bodies, to better understand how to expand computational interfaces beyond fingertip-focused to become body-conscious and thicken computational spaces from the flat land of screens to fully three-dimensional environments.

eleVR is a project of the Human Advancement Research Community, a nonprofit group dedicated to inventing and freely sharing ideas and technology that allow all humans to see further and understand more deeply."
3d  vr  sanfrancisco  vihart  andreahawksley  meifler  elijahbutterfield  evelyneastmond  ar  augmentedreality  technology  elevr  virtualreality 
july 2017 by robertogreco
Imaginary Cities: An Interview with Darran Anderson – RhysTranter.com
"When a city is dominated by one vision, it becomes either a sterile corpse, however pretty it looks, or, at worst, an all-out tyranny. I’d go as far to say that the very idea of a city is predicated on it being a plurality. When it is singular, it becomes something else; namely a citadel that benefits the powerful, whoever that may be in a given society. That’s one of the reasons that planned cities very often (though not always) fall flat. We forget to build in accidents and resistances – the dialectics of urbanism where different ideas are colliding and synthesizing and pushing things creatively forward in the process. When cities, and indeed countries, adopt a siege mentality, they stagnate and the inhabitants go slowly mad. We’re about to find out a lot of things about what Britain really is. I suspect, given certain cherished illusions await shattering, it’ll be a huge and very dark wake-up call indeed. Nothing would delight me more than to be wrong on this incidentally but I can see it getting decidedly Children of Men sooner than we think. On a less pessimistic note, it will also be a real test of British cities as international outward-facing metropolises, a challenge that anyone with a progressive atom in their body needs to fight in advance rather than retreat. We are mongrel peoples on these islands. We do well not to begin attempting to dismantle ourselves or anyone else for that matter. The future, if we wish to be part of it, is plural."



"We have a tendency to think of books as ends in themselves, which has always seemed somewhat ludicrous, even a bit arrogant to me; the assumption because you’ve read Isherwood’s Berlin novels, you’ve got the Weimar Republic sussed (I don’t mean that detrimentally to Isherwood, whose work I love, incidentally). It’s like that bucket list approach to experience, when you hear someone say they’ve ‘done’ Europe or Thailand. However great a book is, however ‘definitive’ it is on a subject, it strikes me as only a point of beginning or as temporarily conclusive, as time and perspectives are constantly changing. I’ve always had enough self-doubt to be resistant to definitive narratives so I wanted Imaginary Cities to be full of points of departure, contradictions and questions. That’s one of the things I loved about Calvino’s Invisible Cities, which the title is also a nod to. The sense of poetic incompleteness to it. The feeling that the story is continuing on somewhere beyond its pages."



"I’ve always been interested in the thresholds and crossovers of disciplines. “Architecture begins where engineering ends”, the great Walter Gropius said. I think there’s a sort of shifting hinterland between the two, where often the most exciting things are happening. We limit ourselves when we separate things too much. That works for all disciplines. There’s a lot to learn from peering over the walls we’ve built. And I’d question the motives we have in building most of these walls; very often it’s quite petty obscurantism, which ultimately holds us all back.

The first writer I ever fell in love with was Robert Louis Stevenson and I think he had a lasting influence; by his example, you have the permission to wander, literally and figuratively – you can write adventure stories and fuse them with psychological, geographical and historical observations, you can write memoirs, children’s stories, explorations, you can travel with a donkey in the Cévennes if you want. And you can do it all with a continual voice and purpose that threads through everything, even when it seems like chaos or a cacophony.

The writers I’ve loved since, from Montaigne to Borges to Solnit have that same sense of roaming, of proving “why not?” when stepping over frequently-artificial boundaries. It’s not for everyone but I love literature that contains this tendency to roam. It goes beyond even literature I suppose. There’s a colossal amount of be gained from learning from people in other artforms, cine-essayists like Chris Marker or musicians like Brian Eno. I’m not really interested in literature that just speaks to itself. I’d rather literature be a dense and messy city than an ordered monastery."



"We might think of them as problems but I think they’re essential to keep cities alive. I spoke about this at the Venice Architecture Biennale a few months ago and every day since, post-Brexit, it’s got more and more apparent how vital this is. When a city is dominated by one vision, it becomes either a sterile corpse, however pretty it looks, or, at worst, an all-out tyranny. I’d go as far to say that the very idea of a city is predicated on it being a plurality. When it is singular, it becomes something else; namely a citadel that benefits the powerful, whoever that may be in a given society. That’s one of the reasons that planned cities very often (though not always) fall flat. We forget to build in accidents and resistances – the dialectics of urbanism where different ideas are colliding and synthesizing and pushing things creatively forward in the process. When cities, and indeed countries, adopt a siege mentality, they stagnate and the inhabitants go slowly mad. We’re about to find out a lot of things about what Britain really is. I suspect, given certain cherished illusions await shattering, it’ll be a huge and very dark wake-up call indeed. Nothing would delight me more than to be wrong on this incidentally but I can see it getting decidedly Children of Men sooner than we think. On a less pessimistic note, it will also be a real test of British cities as international outward-facing metropolises, a challenge that anyone with a progressive atom in their body needs to fight in advance rather than retreat. We are mongrel peoples on these islands. We do well not to begin attempting to dismantle ourselves or anyone else for that matter. The future, if we wish to be part of it, is plural."



"If you live in a city, every aspect of your life takes place within urban space. The journeys you make are charted through it. The experiences you undertake have a stage. Space seeps into your memories and, by association, your memories seep into space. There are very obvious examples to this – hospitals, churches, graveyards – but also train stations where you saw someone for the last time or pubs where you met for the first time. Streets that mean nothing to most have profound connotations for others. They are the setting of our own private mythologies."



"Bookish folks like you and I explore this largely with literature as an aid but, though I believe books will always have a place, they seem to be more peripheral than we’d like to admit. As much as culture helps define our perception of cities, it has its limits. For me, the starting point for Dublin is Ulysses, just as Kafka is for Prague, and Dostoevsky or Bely is for St Petersburg and yet when I go to places like those, I find that these presumptions are attractive illusions. So much time has passed since those works were written and it was all subjective to begin with. That’s the beauty: the city is not the same thing to any two people, no matter how it is branded. One of the things I’m interested in is how the urban influences us, and the way we see ourselves, in ways that are often overlooked or come by implication. When we look at the Romantics, Sturm und Drang or American Transcendentalism, we tend to take them at their word and focus on rural arcadias or encounters with the sublime in the wilderness. To me, they are profoundly urban. They are the glorious side-effects brought on by the rise of the Industrial Revolution and the huge drive of urbanisation that followed. So even our ideas of escaping to the sanctuary of the countryside, even our conceptions of what the countryside is and for, are profoundly shaped by the appearance and evolution of cities."



"In the near-future, I see the manner in which our identities merge with our surroundings becoming acutely apparent. In terms of technology, it’s easy to see the cumbersome interfaces that we navigate with, the smartphone for example, disappearing. I see this happening somewhat with the book as well (though I’ve no doubt it will remain as an escape into another type of space). The literary approach to cities will become much more interactive with the environment. This isn’t a new idea. The Situationists, who I’m not uncritical of, hinted at this by shifting the focus away from academic texts to games, maps, graffiti, and the streets themselves. With developments in augmented reality, I can see the city becoming a form of text, not just with buildings annotated but actually offering creative input and manipulation. We already read cities without thinking about it. We may come to write them too."
darrananderson  urbanism  architecture  cities  2016  community  society  siegementality  planning  urban  italocalvino  space  identity  memory  augmentedreality  books  writing  interactivity  interactive  situationist  urbanization  ar 
october 2016 by robertogreco
11 video game trends that will change the future of the industry | Technology | The Guardian
"1. VR with friends rather than alone

2. Physically collaborative games

Virtual reality and its experimental tech contemporaries are exploring new ways to incorporate the body as more than just an anchor to the physical world. As Ghislaine Boddington, creative director of body>data>space, noted in her talk on virtual reality and the “internet of bodies”, the hope for the future is in recognising and augmenting physical bodies in games and play. She offers technologies like programmable gels used with the body in more intimate ways, such as rubbing “gels on to erogenous zones”, allowing partners to “connect together at a distance”.

Boddington also noted the future of physically collaborative and increasingly social spaces in AR, as seen in the very popular Pokémon Go: “Pokémon Go is definitely a collaborative share space. The Pokémon Go site, along with many others, allow the individual to join with the group into the middle, both in a physical and a virtual way.”

Implications of the physical are vast, as Robin Hunicke, co-founder and creative director of Funomena (Woorld, Luna) and previously of thatgamecompany (Journey), noted on the psychological impact of VR brought about by gestural controls, and recognising the capacity of range of movement from players. What does it mean for a player, psychologically, to encourage them to stand tall and strike a powerful pose? What might it mean to force them into a crouched position, to feel small? The necessity of an embodied experience in VR also brings up new questions, such as what the platform offers by way of accessibility.

3. The future of augmented reality

Pokémon Go came to the UK on the third and last day of the conference, and it felt like everyone in Brighton was catching Magikarp and Shellder and Seel and all the other water Pokémon the seaside town had to offer. Had this international hit been available a little earlier, the conference schedule would surely have contained a few more panels about augmented reality. Whether we can expect to see an AR-heavy Develop 2017 will depend on whether Pokémon Go represents the start of a new trend, or if it’s simply a one-off success carried by an already successful brand.

Ismail thinks the latter. When asked what he would do with Pokémon Go, he said that he would sell it, and that it hasn’t proven anything about AR itself. “We’re seeing a lot of discussion right now about whether AR just beat VR, and I think that would be a very wrong statement. Like, Pokémon beat VR, that’s for sure, but I guess Pokémon beat everything at the moment. Pokémon beat Tinder and Twitter, which is a big deal.”

Hunicke might not be looking to make the next Pokémon Go, but she’s still interested in the potential of augmented-reality games that “make the world more silly and joyful, and less logical”. One of Funomena’s upcoming games, Woorld, is described as “a hand-held Alternative Reality experience”, a “whimsical, exploratory application” that lets you place virtual objects against the backdrop of your physical environment. Created in collaboration with Google, with art from Keita Takahashi (Katamari Damacy, Noby Noby Boy), this colourful augmented-reality game and sandbox will be available on devices that include Google’s new AR-enabling platform Tango, like the upcoming Lenovo Phab2 Pro.

4. Incremental console updates …

5. The next step for mobile: TV …

6. Sayonara, Steam: the rise of specialised stores

The number of games on Steam is on the rise, and with it, the number of games that go unplayed or unnoticed. Nearly 37% of all registered Steam games go unplayed , and it’s no secret that many indie games – even good, critically acclaimed games – get lost amid a sea of other green lit games.

In light of this, smaller more specialised distribution services are becoming more important. Itch.io, an “indie game marketplace and DIY game jam host” is already hugely popular in the indie scene, offering pay-what-you-want and minimum-pricing models. Just last year, Itch’s co-founder Leaf Corcoran revealed in a blog post about the site’s finances that they had paid out $393,000 to developers. Since then, the platform has only grown and it’s likely that we’ll see more specialised distributors following Itch’s model.

7. The rise of indie studios …

8. Rejecting crunch

Crunch, ie mandatory (and often unpaid) overtime in the weeks or months leading to a game’s release, has long been an issue for this industry. More than a decade since Erin Hoffman wrote about her husband’s experiences of unpaid overtime when working for EA, in an originally anonymous blog post known at the time as “EA Spouse”, crunch is still commonplace in studios of all sizes, and people are still fighting it.

At this year’s Develop, Machine Studios (Maia) founder Simon Roth gave a talk called “Killing the Indie Crunch Myth: Shipping Games Alive”, which began tweet:
People who support crunch are going against 100+ years of data and science. They are the flat earthers of software development.

9. Design that puts feelings first

The design practice underlying Hunicke’s studio Funomena, and the focus of her keynote, is one she calls “feel engineering”. As Hunicke describes it: “Feel engineering is the process by which you create a game backwards from the feeling you want to create in a person forward towards the mechanics and the dynamics of the game itself.” She notes that while feel engineering isn’t easy, due to its time commitment, high cost, and level of emotional investment asked from development teams, it’s worth it. Hunicke speaks to the positive studio culture of feeling-focused engineering, and its contrast to the toxicity of crunch is evident. “The process of making it is so delightful,” she adds. “It’s so much better than anything I’ve ever done.”

We’ve already seen aspects of feel engineering in the mobile market, with games looking to reverse-engineer social situations people already find fun. Haslam outlines how the design of “co-operative shouting game” Spaceteam was inspired by the social experience of playing a board game with friends, an experience its lead designer Henry Smith already enjoyed.

10. Trying – and failing …

11. Feeling twitchy about YouTube and Twitch"
games  gaming  videogames  future  2016  vr  virtualreality  ar  augmentedreality  youtube  twitch  funomena  kickstarter  crowdfunding  indiegames  design  gamedesign  spaceteam  social  collaboration  braid  worldofgoo  steam  itch.io  mobile  phones  smartphones  pokemongo  keitatakahashi  robinhunicke  thatgamecompany  ghislaineboddington  body>data>space  bodies  play  physical  oculusrift  ramiismail  jordanericaebber  katbrewster  pokémongo  body 
july 2016 by robertogreco
Full Thoughts on Pokemon Go from my interview on The Verge — Medium
[via: "And the ideas of "intentional obtuseness" in Pokemon Go (and Snapchat):"
https://twitter.com/tealtan/status/754162625802534912
along with these:
http://makegames.tumblr.com/post/147367627844/this-is-an-excerpt-from-the-spelunky-book-which
http://tevisthompson.com/saving-zelda/ ]

"Andrew Webster over at The Verge interviewed Rami Ismail, Asher Vollmer, and I about Pokemon Go. It's a great piece and the thoughts from Asher and Rami are very good. You should read the piece.

Pokemon Go has been as divisive as it has been phenomenal, so I wanted to post up the full-text from the interview now that parts are up online.

--- Do you think it's a good game / does it do what it sets out to do successfully?

I think Pokemon Go is a great game.

To really understand why it's important to recognize that some games are made great by their mechanics, and some are made great by their communities. Since games really only exist when they are being played, it's very difficult (or maybe impossible) to meaningfully separate a community from a game itself. I think a lot about something my friend and fellow designer Doug Wilson (JS Joust, B.U.T.T.O.N.) told me once about how he designs games: Unlike most developers I know, Doug makes games not by designing intricate and mentally exciting systems, but by looking for interactions that are just physically or emotionally fun to do. I think recognizing this emotional/physical aspect to games is key to understanding much of what Pokemon Go has done brilliantly.

I've seen twitter folks and reviewers complaining about the experience being good but the game itself being bad, but i'm not sure it's entirely fair to pick it apart like that. "What the game is mechanically" or at least what it appears to be mechanically is a huge part of what's drawing so many people to play it, and the biggest, most magical part of playing Pokemon Go right now is that it's the first real-world sized, real world game. By which I mean, the game not only takes place in the real world, but it has enough players to fill it up.

--- Does it even matter if it's "good"?

I think what people are claiming as "bad" is actually a creeping component of modern viral game design — opaque UI. Theres no indication yet as to if the extremely awkward UI of Pokemon Go was intentional or not, but either way I think the aggressive obfuscation (and lacking tutorialization) of the deeper game mechanics is doing a lot to bring players in. Not only is it hiding the more complicated parts of the game from new players, but it enables a lot of discovery sharing amongst friends, kids and parents, websites and readers, etc. Beyond the confusing gym-battle UI you can see this practice stretches into many clearly intentional design decisions in the game: Battle-use items only show up around level 8, Great Balls at level 12, and the pokedex keeps expanding as you find higher and higher numbered Pokemon. These early-level omissions both simplify the game and add to the excitement of players discovering them. How many pokemon are even in this game? I have no idea, but I sure want to find out!

--- What do you think are the most important design aspects that led to it blowing up like this? (i.e. things other than it being Pokemon)

Obviously Pokemon being a gigantic brand is the single biggest thing contributing to the massive player explosion, but no brand is powerful enough to do something like this on it's own — it had to be paired with the perfect game.

Pokemon Go does a lot of things very right, and some of the easiest to spot pop up pretty quickly when you compare it to older team-based AR games like ConQwest or Niantic's own Ingress. Unlike those prior AR games, Pokemon Go is not initially (or necessarily ever) a competitive game. Additionally, like many of the most successful mobile games, you can grasp the entire initial ruleset from watching someone else play the game.

It seems obvious to say, but I believe one of the most substantial features of Pokemon Go is that just walking around catching Pokemon is fun, even if you do absolutely nothing else. And while it seems simple, there are a lot of clever mechanics supporting this small action. The hilariously jankey but stressful ball tossing minigame is just hard enough to make you feel proud when you catch a pokemon, but still incredibly accessible. The vaguely detective-like tracking interface gives you a good reason to rush outside if theres a new pokemon silhouette, while still making them just hard enough to find to encourage strangers on the street to offer unsolicited advice to other players. Even the AR component is used appropriately sparingly to drive home the collecting game. While the technology is still rough, it works just well enough to cement our belief that pokemon are actually in places, and drives the language that players use to communicate with each other ("Theres a squirtle on that corner!"). AR gives the more visible and obvious side-bennefit of social image sharing, but I think its most successful function in Pokemon Go is it's capacity to feed our imaginations. Despite being an AR game, Pokemon Go is still largely played in our imaginations, just like any other game, and being able to see a Pikachu on a street-corner just for a second fuels our fantasy worlds immensely.

--- As a designer what are the most interesting aspects of the game / phenomenon to you? LIke what are things you would like to pull from it for your own?

One of the most exciting things about the success of Pokemon Go is that it gives us a blueprint for what people want out of augmented reality. As far as I can tell, the biggest thing we want from it is social camaraderie — which, feels like it should be obvious, but clearly was not when you look at just how few prior AR games have been non-competitive. Less excitingly but just as obviously, AR game players want to see and interact with other players around them. While news outlets joke that Pokemon Go is a great excuse to go out into the real world and then ignore it, I'd argue that while Pokemon Go players are potentially less connected to the physical outdoors than non-players, they're more connected to the social fabric of society outside. I've interacted with more strangers in NYC in a few days of playing Pokemon than in the last decade I lived there. In aggressively fractured world of headphones and podcasts and socially-filtered news, it's really exciting to see a piece of tech that makes the social space feel vast and whole again.

Of course, there are developers and thinkers out there who are sad to see AR require such high-levels engagement to take off, lamenting that this kind of feat is only viable to global brands, and while that may be true, I think this kind of game coming out only makes it more accessible to indies. I'm certainly not saying that it is accessible to indies, but that this can only help. Not only does it introduce huge swaths of people to AR games, but it also shows us what we're up against if we want to make something like this, and the first thing that makes solving an impossible problem easier knowing exactly what the problem is."
vi:tealtan  pokemongo  2016  games  gaming  play  interface  ux  learning  howelearn  howweplay  videogames  andrewwebster  ramiismail  ashervollmer  zachgage  ar  design  ui  snapchat  srg  edg  gamedesign  zpd  howwelearn  exploration  pokémongo  augmentedreality 
july 2016 by robertogreco
Ghost in the machine: Snapchat isn’t mobile-first — it’s something else entirely — Free Code Camp
"Snapchat is not mobile-first, and it’s not really an app anymore. Nor is it a meta-app platform at this point like Facebook Messenger is angling to become (at least not yet). Snapchat is a true creature of mobile, a living, breathing embodiment of everything that our camera-enabled, networked pocket computer can possibly offer. And in its cooption of smartphones into a true social operating system, we see the inklings of what is beyond mobile.
When I open Snapchat up to the camera, I can’t shake the feeling that the ghost is banging on the glass, trying to break out into the world."
snapchat  benbasche  2016  photography  ar  augmentedreality  design  ux  ui  media  susansontag  nathanjurgenson  cameras  feeds  mobile  mobilefirst  twitter  facebook  instagram  experience  socialmedia  smartphones  uber  authenticallymobile  evanspiegel 
july 2016 by robertogreco
Magic Leap
"You already own the world’s most amazing computer. You’re using it right now, to think with and blink with and maybe even smile with. It’s your one-of-a-kind mind. And with it, you can do incredible things. Magic things.

Compare that to the technology in your life. You know, those rectangular boxes that you spend the majority of your life staring into? The ones that demand your attention, and keep you distracted from the things that really matter: Friends! Family! Dragons!

With those things in mind, we decided to take a different path and rethink the relationship technology has with people. What we found was when you give the brain and the body what they want, suddenly the shackles are off, the rectangular boxes are tossed, and something magical happens…experiences like none you’ve ever seen.

Whales jump out of gymnasium floors, solar systems can be held in the palm of your hand, and you can share your world in completely new ways.

We’re so excited to show you what we’re building. So while we work to get it exactly right for you, please keep in touch and know that magic is right around the corner."

[via: https://pinboard.in/u:robertogreco/b:b2bc58181cd9 ]
magicleap  ar  augmentedreality  vr  virtualreality 
march 2016 by robertogreco
Popular versus Brilliant | Designers + Geeks
"Jim Bull is worried about the future of design and thinks you should be too. Co-founder and Chief Creative Officer of Moving Brands, Jim dissects an industry where design is judged by the number of its likes and shares, where the focus is on efficiency rather than brilliance, and where one or two companies set the design standard for the globe."

[Direct link to video: https://vimeo.com/155640569 ]

[Tagged “web rococo” because this is the opposite.]

[Not sure why there is no mention of Tibor Kalman and Oliviero Toscani in the Benetton discussion. And there seems to be some tunnel vision here. Sure, the big SV VC backed companies are all looking the same, but they're not the only ones making things on the web. You know, there are many other countries and languages to look to for something other than California Design. Uh, maybe that's more the issue: SV only sees itself and it's not diverse.]

[via: https://twitter.com/soopa/status/700559147247357952 ]
jimbbull  californiadesign  siliconvalley  2016  branding  reverence  generic  popularity  brilliance  apple  uber  medium  california  graphicdesign  webdesign  movingbrands  productdesign  sameness  webrococo  benetton  olivierotoscani  tiborkalman  design  business  california-zation  homogenization  designeducation  art  differentiation  ui  ux  screens  magicleap  ar  augmentedreality  virtualreality  packaging  vr  webdev 
february 2016 by robertogreco
MODERN POLAXIS
"Modern Polaxis is a paranoid time traveller. Polaxis writes about all his strange experiences in his private journal. BUT, all his secret information, his paranoid delusions and conspiracy theories, he hides that away in a layer of Augmented Reality. Get the app and the book to hear and see the world as Polaxis sees it.

Story
Polaxis believes the world we live in is a holographic projection from another plane in the universe. This projection is known as Intafrag and is patrolled by Intafrag agents. The agents monitor glitches and pursue time travelling fugitives. Polaxis believes he is one of these fugitives. But, he can't quite prove any of this because he was pretty wasted the last time he time travelled. Polaxis must hurry, for IF the fabric of our reality is merely a flickering light, what happens when someone flicks the switch off?

Creators
Written, Illustrated and animated by: SUTU
Programming by: Lukasz Karluk
Music by: Lhasa Mencur"


[See also:
https://itunes.apple.com/au/app/polaxis/id550870541
https://vimeo.com/108436404

"(┛`д´)┛ Sutu is an interactive comic artist and the creator of Modern Polaxis, Nawlz and Neomad. www.sutueatsflies.com www.modernpolaxis.com"
http://www.sutueatsflies.com/
https://instagram.com/sutueatsflies/
http://sutueatsflies.tumblr.com/ ]

[via: https://instagram.com/p/6UJOlHpjqb/ ]
comics  sutu  edg  srg  augmentedreality  comicbooks  applications  ios  animation  ar 
august 2015 by robertogreco
Finding Out What the Past Smelled Like — The Atlantic
"Augmented reality could change the way we understand—and experience—history."



"It was the smell that hit me first, a heady mixture of roasting meat, woodsmoke, and farmyard manure. Nearby I could hear a low murmured conversation—but the words were muffled and unclear. I could see piles of stones clustered across the edge of a bleak Cornish moorland hillside and an ominous raincloud gathering over the closest hill.

But there were no houses, no people, and no welcome barbecue. With freezing fingers I held up my iPad, viewing the landscape through the camera feed. I saw the icons change as the GPS recognized my position and, as if by magic, the houses began to appear, each one loading onto the screen, materializing in position above the round piles of prehistoric stone. Using the screen as a guide, I picked my way through the virtual settlement, walking around the houses as if they were real. As I walked toward one, the sound of the conversation got louder, and I could hear the crackling of a fire. The smell of the meat got stronger, filling my nostrils and making my mouth water. I reached the door, and looked inside, expecting to feel the heat of a welcome fire and the shelter of the roof. But all I saw was a rendered straw floor. And as I lowered the iPad, I saw again a pile of stones no higher than my knee, arranged in a circle with a gap for a doorway. The raincloud is getting closer.

This was my experience during testing a prototype augmented-reality application I designed to allow an embodied exploration of past landscapes. I built the system using low-cost materials and cheap or free software. I’m an archaeologist, and I am particularly interested in finding out what it was like to live in the past. (I'm calling the app Dead Men’s Eyes, a name that comes from a short story by Montague Rhodes James in which a man discovers a pair of old binoculars made by an eccentric antiquarian. When he looks through them, he is shown a world that no longer exists, and sees grisly scenes from the past.)"
smell  smellscapes  maps  mapping  history  2015  augmentedreality  stuarteve  ar 
march 2015 by robertogreco
Instagramming Dinosaurs: Clive Thompson on Museums in the Digital Age (4 of 4) | Moosha Moosha Mooshme
"Q: Clive, we’re sitting here talking about all these ways that digital media can augment our abilities to think, to access our minds, to connect with others, think with others and have deeper understanding and reflection after the event. We’re doing this in a museum that was founded in 1869, looking at dinosaurs that are millions of years old, where the tools that we are talking about that can empower that kind of thinking are like “a blip of a blip” in the timeline.

So if this museum was created today, if you were re-designing this hall, and you were thinking about what it would mean for a Natural History Museum to create a space that could support people to use these tools, what would you do?

A: That’s a really good question. I’ll start off by saying I have an enormous respect and fondness for people that create museum exhibits. They’re the first people to have had to think through the implications of multimedia. When they are communicating this to the public, trying to explain dinosaurs, they use text. There’s pictures. They had to decide what physical items should we have. And then there are these sound guys, the first people to start asking, “Why don’t we have the ability to walk through here and have someone talk on computers?” So in this room there’s four forms of media, being used right now, pioneered by museum people. People in the news media didn’t have to think this way. Teachers didn’t have to think this way. But museum exhibit people have been working in multimedia for like a 150 fifty years, frankly, so this room is already a lot richer than most other places you’d see.

If you wanted to add more to it, there are a couple of low hanging fruits. The dinosaurs are wonderful physical artifacts and it’s often startling to realize how big they are, or what their shape is. Look up there at how serrated that tooth is on that T-Rex. How big is that? Well, what would it be like if I held it in my hand? In fact one thing you can start to do is to make these physical objects shout using 3D printing. These days you have a lot of 3D printers that are becoming cheaper. This is essentially the transmission of physical piece of knowledge across the ether. What if I could go to an online site and download and print a copy of any parts of this dinosaur, because I would love one of those teeth, you know? Imagine: having just one of those just sitting on my desk would be a really cool way to reflect on the size and might of this enormous creature. So the physical sharing of these rich artifacts I think is a fantastic new form of media that’s coming along.

The second thing is you can actually do some really cool things with augmented reality. Augmented reality is the concept of being able to hold up the phone and having it overlay over what you’re seeing – information that helps you look at in a different way or learn things about it. And by and large a lot of our augmented reality has not worked very well in the everyday world, but I think it’s because in the everyday world, we often don’t really want a huge information rich experience as we walk down the street. But I could have a little app that I can load and pull it back and forth and be able to see different parts of that dinosaur, with labels, as I move it back and forth, or see the way that the jaw moved. These are ways that would really help me get new dimensions out of what’s physically in front of me. So there is a couple of things that I think we could start to do.

You could probably think a little bit about integrating public thinking into an environment like this. [re: part two of this interview]

Q: How can I, as a visitor to this hall, know what other people are thinking here?

A: Well, yeah, that’s a fun question: so how can we identify the most interesting things anyone has said about this dinosaur? You know, what are the three most up-voted smartest reflections. It could be someone’s having a thought, or a visitor who had some interesting visceral reaction to this, or it could be someone who has found an amazing quote in one of the newspapers in the 19th century when this thing was first uncorked. Those things are hard to engineer because the signal-to-noise ratio can be really high in public thinking. 90% of what people say online it pretty banal. And so we have that challenge, to find the best stuff people have said about this dinosaur, over and over again.

That’s a hard one to surmount, but pretty cool if you could do it.

Wow, I hadn’t seen that tail before. Holy Moses, that’s long!"

[The full set: http://www.mooshme.org/?s=clive+thompson ]
clivethompson  amnh  2014  barryjoseph  socialmedia  instagram  learning  museum  interactive  interactivity  multimedia  augmentedreality  publicthinking  3dprinting  museums  exhibitions  exhibits  exhibitdesign  design  ar 
january 2015 by robertogreco
Stories You Can Win: Margaret Robertson for the Future of StoryTelling 2012 on Vimeo
"Games have always needed stories, says celebrated game designer Margaret Robertson. For many, the first ever videogame was 1962's Space War. It couldn't have been simpler to look at: startlingly abstract wireframes only. Space War could hardly be a smaller story, but it allowed players to make sense of the abstract shapes, of the strange new interaction unfolding before them. And from that point on, games have consistently chased a richer relationship with stories. Technology has always made that hard, though. There were great stories in early games, but ones that you had to sip through the thinnest of straws. Everything we take for granted in other mediums of storytelling was brutally rationed in early gaming.

But now we've beaten those constraints. Modern games have scripts tens of thousands of pages long. They record tens of thousands of lines of dialogue and display perfectly lifelike facial expressions and body movement. Natural language conversations are becoming possible with artificial characters. Some game developers even consider that the artificial creations they make can be meaningfully said to be alive. So does that mean we've cracked story? Not quite. Story is hard. Story is fragile. Story is expensive. Players chew through it fast, and expect it to be endlessly responsive to their actions. Writing one good straight story is hard enough at the best of times. Producing one that's expected to last twenty times as long as most feature films and have a hundred credible endings is next to impossible.

So how do we fix that problem? We fix it by letting games work their own particular magic. Games are engines for making stories. Their rule sets and objectives are mechanisms that engender the things that drive stories—courage, failure, shame, greed, sacrifice, surprise—and gives them context and structure. If you build a captivating world and give players interesting rules, then they'll tell a thousand stories for you. And we fix it by letting games go free range. Whereas you needed to gather round a monolithic PDP-1 to play Space War, now most of us carry one computer in our pocket and another in our backpack. Games are leaking out on to our streets and our parks and our campuses and our beaches, and there is enormous potential to use those environments to tell new kinds of stories. This is what excites Robertson the most as a game designer: being able to give players a stage from which they can start to tell their own stories."
games  videogames  storytelling  2012  gaming  history  margaretrobinson  technology  cyoa  passage  jasonrohrer  spacewar  augmentedreality  play  arg  srg  if  interactivefiction  ar 
september 2014 by robertogreco
Dennō Coil - Wikipedia
"Dennō Coil (電脳コイル Dennō Koiru?, lit. Electric Brain Coil or Computer Coil), Coil—A Circle of Children, is a Japanese science fiction anime television series depicting a near future where semi-immersive augmented reality (AR) technology has just begun to enter the mainstream. The series takes place in the fictional city of Daikoku, a hotbed of AR development with an emerging city-wide virtual infrastructure. It follows a group of children as they use AR glasses to unravel the mysteries of the half real, half Internet city, using a variety of illegal software tools, techniques, and virtual pets to manipulate the digital landscape.

Dennō Coil, in development for over a decade, is the series director debut of Japanese animator Mitsuo Iso. It premiered on NHK Educational TV on May 12, 2007. Due to the animators involved in its production and its unusually high-profile television broadcast time slot, Dennō Coil was highly anticipated."

Plot

In 2026, eleven years after the introduction of internet-connected augmented reality eyeglasses and visors, Yūko Okonogi moves with her family to the city of Daikoku, the technological center of the emerging half-virtual world. Yūko joins her grandmother's "investigation agency" made up of children equipped with virtual tools and metatags. As their research turns up mounting evidence of children who have been whisked away to the mysterious "other side" of reality, they find themselves entangled in a conspiracy to cover up the dangerous true nature and history of the new technology.



Technology

Dennō is the word used in the series to differentiate between virtual and real, e.g. "dennō cat". Literally translating to "electric brain", the title of the show itself, Dennō Coil, refers to the dangerous phenomenon of the separation of one's digital self from the physical body.

The children access the virtual world through Internet-connected visors called dennō eyeglasses. This allows them to see virtual reality superimposed on objective reality. To visually confirm something as virtual, the children often lift their glasses from their eyes. The visors also work in conjunction with futuristic ear monitors placed behind the ear, which allow the wearer to hear sounds from the virtual environment"

[Reminds me of Chupan Chupai: https://vimeo.com/84978203 ]
anime  towatch  via:tealtan  technology  scifi  sciencefiction  2026  augmentedreality  chupanchupai  hobosigns  hobocodes  glyphs  virtualreality  tamagotchi  children  play  dennōcoil  cityasclassroom  thecityishereforyoutouse  smartcity  smartcities  vr  ar 
august 2014 by robertogreco
Lost Landmarks
"Explore New York's forgotten past with augmented reality binocular viewers."
nyc  history  augmentedreality  ar 
may 2014 by robertogreco
Scan Jose | www.scanjose.org
"Scan Jose is a mobile website and augmented reality browser that allows you to experience San Jose's history like you never have before. Using this website, you can view historic images from the collections of the San Jose Public Library and the Sourisseau Academy while actually visiting the locations those pictures were originally taken in. We invite you to write comments and add to the collective history of these important parts of San Jose's past. You can also view any of these stops in 3D with the Layar augmented reality browser. To do this, visit the iTunes app store or the Android Marketplace, download the Layar app, and search for 'Scan Jose'.


Scan Jose was supported in part by the U.S. Institute of Museum and Library Services under the provisions of the Library Services and Technology Act, administered in California by the State Librarian."

[via this conversation: http://connectedlearning.tv/mobiles-and-informal-learning-spaces-libraries-and-museums ]
sanjose  mobile  history  california  sanjosepubliclibrary  sourisseauacademy  layar  augmentedreality  photography  atemporality  location  location-based  ar 
october 2013 by robertogreco
A conversation between Rob Walker and co-founder of Area/Code, Kevin Slavin : Observatory: Design Observer
"I know some of the people involved in Museum of the Phantom City, and they’re good people. But, in order to see the things that they want to point out, I have to go that place — well, okay. But then, once I’m there, the best way to display that information is the juxtaposition of it in front of what I’ve just traveled there to see? I don’t think so. Bottom line, maybe, is that visualizing the invisible is difficult, and might not be best expressed through the metaphor of the camera."

"What's important to me about the kinds of things we were doing with Area/Code — and all the designers around us — is that we were building systems in the middle of the data, some systems that gave us a way to read, and reasons to read it. The stories we were telling with locative games were fiction, but as always, good fiction describes the real world rather precisely."
trading  algorithmictrading  gps  geocaching  design  urban  softwareforcities  software  algorithms  cities  finance  paolaantonelli  reality  phantomcity  augmentedreality  storytelling  fiction  photography  area/code  robwalker  2011  kevinslavin  ar  from delicious
may 2012 by robertogreco
Song of the Machine on Vimeo
What if we could change our view of the world with the flick of a switch? 'Song of the Machine' explores the possibilities of a new, modified – even enhanced – vision, where users can tune into streams of information and electromagnetic vistas currently outside of human vision.

This film is a part of an ongoing collaboration between Superflux and neuroscientist Dr. Patrick Degenaar, whose pioneering work in optogenetic retinal prostheses aims to bring back sight to the blind.

Unlike the implants and electrodes used to achieve bionic vision, this science modifies the human body genetically from within. First, a virus is used to infect the degenerate eye with a light-sensitive protein, altering the biological capabilities of the subject…"

[More: http://superflux.in/blog/song-of-the-machine-in-depth AND http://www.sciencegallery.com/humanplus/song-machine ]
2011  vision  sensing  senses  justinpickard  blind  sight  augmentation  prosthetics  perception  augmentedreality  ar  from delicious
february 2012 by robertogreco
MoMA | Talk to Me BETA
"New branches of design practice have emerged in the past decades that combine design’s old-fashioned preoccupations—with form, function, and meaning—with a focus on the exchange of information and even emotion. Communication design deals with the delivery of messages, encompassing graphic design, wayfinding, and communicative objects of all kinds, from printed materials to three-dimensional and digital projects. Interface and interaction design delineate the behavior of products and systems as well as the experiences that people will have with them. Information and visualization design deal with the maps, diagrams, and tools that filter and make sense of information. In critical design, conceptual scenarios are built around hypothetical objects to comment on the social, political, and cultural consequences of new technologies and behaviors."
cities  interaction  interface  augmentedreality  2011  talktome  moma  design  media  objects  dialogue  socialnetworks  information  technology  dialog  ar  from delicious
july 2011 by robertogreco
Marshall McLuhan Walking Tour now on Layar | Spark | CBC Radio
"A few weeks ago, Spark launched a Marshall McLuhan Walking Tour featuring downloadable audio guides to help you explore some of the places and people that influenced McLuhan.

After the audio tour launched, we received an email from Brian Sutherland, wondering if we’d be interested in an augmented reality version of the tour. ”Of course!” we said.

So now, thanks to Brian’s hard work, you can explore the McLuhan Walking Tour using your mobile device. He’s created an augmented reality layer for the smartphone application Layer. Simply download the Layar application (available for iPhone, Android, and some Nokia phones), then follow this link on your phone (or search for “McLuhan” within the Layar app)."

[See also: http://www.cbc.ca/spark/mcluhan/ ]
marshallmcluhan  walking  tours  layar  augmentedreality  toronto  ar  from delicious
july 2011 by robertogreco
haque design + research - on reality, augmented reality, and that talk by kevin
“the only “augmented” reality, is the one that’s constantly being built up through our interactions through the world — whether that’s through a mobile phone, through our sunglasses, or even just through closed eyelids. the process of understanding, it seems to me, is a process of constructing an understanding. the problem with AR, then, is that it assumes that the reality “out there” is fixed, and that we’re merely passive observers that need some kind of markup on it to help understand it “better”. it’s like the terminator analogy you cited: AR is set up so that “we” are sitting inside, simply waiting for info to come in (like arnie “seeing” inside his own head with its own reductio ad absurdam) and all the concomitant repercussions on what this means for our own agency (or lack thereof) in the world. it also assumes that we all see the same thing, which we manifestly do not — and this isn’t because of some distortion in our perceptors…"
visualization  kevinslavin  usmanhaque  augmentedreality  ar  2011  momoamsterdam  via:preoccupations  theory  from delicious
june 2011 by robertogreco
Reality *is* Plenty | Serial Consign
"My reading of the talk is that Slavin is extremely curious about augmenting reality—as praxis—and suggesting we (startups, developers and consumers) need to be considerably more thoughtful in our application/exploration of the emerging medium and consider how it might activate other senses – AR should not distill down to "an overlay for all seasons". I think the key takeaway point is in Slavin's suggestion that "reality is augmented when it feels different, not looks different" – which basically echoes Marcel Duchamp's (almost) century-old contempt for the 'retinal bias' of the art market. If AR development (thus far) is lacking imagination, perhaps the problem is that we're very much tethering the medium to our antiquated VR pipe dreams and the web browser metaphor."

[Link rot, so Wayback: http://web.archive.org/web/20110701191941/http://serialconsign.com/2011/06/reality-plenty ]
augmentedreality  kevinslavin  2011  momoamsterdam  virtualreality  ar  marcelduchamp  gregsmith  mapping  praxis  via:preoccupations  vr  from delicious
june 2011 by robertogreco
Kevin Slavin – Reality Is Plenty, Thanks. « Mobile Monday Amsterdam
"Kevin Slavin closes the final Mobile Monday Amsterdam with an improvised talk about why reality is plenty. And closing the row of bare feet speakers at the event."

[YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o03wWtWASW4 ]
culture  history  games  psychology  mobile  kevinslavin  ar  augmentedreality  reality  2011  momoamsterdam  tv  television  jeanpiaget  extramission  immersion  mimesis  replication  uncannyvalley  information  tamagotchi  perception  senses  piaget  vision  from delicious
june 2011 by robertogreco
Week 22: Undoing AR | Urbanscale
"What [Kevin Slavin] had to offer was nothing less than a diamond bullet through heart of AR as currently constructed…you could feel things in the world shift around his words as he uttered them."<br />
<br />
"…AR is a profoundly anti-urban(e) technology, & this is the real crux of my beef with its advocates."<br />
<br />
"Certainly as delivered through mobile devices, contemporary AR imposes significant limits on your ability to derive information from the flow of streetlife. It’s not just the “I must look like a dork” implications of walking down street w/ a mobile held visor-like before you…It’s that the city is already trying to tell you things, most of which are likely to be highly, even existentially salient to your experience of place. I can’t help but think that what you’re being offered through the tunnel vision of AR is starkly impoverished by comparison…even before we entertain the very high likelihood of that info being inaccurate, outdated, or commercial or otherwise exploitative…"
ar  alternatereality  adamgreenfield  momoamsterdam  2011  ubicomp  urbancomputing  urbanism  urban  reality  augmentedreality  from delicious
june 2011 by robertogreco
Suwappu: Toys in media – Blog – BERG
"We all remember making up stories with our toys when we were young, or our favourite childhood TV cartoon series where our toys seemed to have impossible, brilliant lives of their own. Now that we have the technology to have toys soak in media, what tales will they tell?"

[See also: http://www.dentsulondon.com/blog/2011/04/05/introducing-suwappu/ ]
berg  toys  ar  suwappu  cartoons  animals  storytelling  2011  play  media  berglondon  timoarnall  dentsu  augmentedreality  from delicious
april 2011 by robertogreco
Introducing: Helicopter Taxi | Toca Boca
"As our first digital toy, we are proud to announce the release of Helicopter Taxi for iPhone! The story is that Rita and Skip, our pilots, run a helicopter taxi that picks up five different characters that need to get to certain places. Your kids can fly the helicopter by walking around in the room and moving the iPhone. Since it is in 3D, you can look at the helicopter from all angles by simply turning the iPhone. After picking all of the characters up and flying them to where they want to go, you fly the helicopter home so Rita and Skip can rest for the night. After that, you’re ready to play again!

Helicopter Taxi uses the camera on the iPhone in an innovative way in order to create an augmented reality effect. It looks like the helicopter is flying in the room with you! You pick the characters up by simply laying the iPhone down on a flat surface, and then they get in or out."
children  gamedesign  toys  iphone  applications  ios  helicoptertaxi  tocaboca  interactive  fun  augmentedreality  ar  from delicious
march 2011 by robertogreco
the Institute for Augmented Ecology - Home
[Posterous is gone, so look here (although not necessarily the same: http://augmentedecology.com/ ]

"Basically its an exploration of the field before it gets to be defined and/or narrowed down by convention. For now it looks like a one year research-period starting Jan 2011 investigating the possibilities which the field of AR offers for connecting people to their direct environment, trying to propose tangents to explore and perhaps prototype new practices or technologies.

This research looks:

to identify or sketch new perspectives, roles, opportunities and risks of AE. work within a broad perspective which is transdisciplinary and transmedial.

to bring this discussion to a specialist and general audience and make unholy alliances.

to look at how media can help people become active stakeholders in the quality of their local ecosytem."
augmentedreality  landscape  ecology  maps  mapping  augmentedecology  monitoring  transdisciplinary  ar  from delicious
january 2011 by robertogreco
Shadow Cities | Your city is a game.
"Step in. Take the role of a modern mage, learn magic and see your surroundings with new eyes. Hunt Shadow Spirits and use spells and strategy to battle for the control of your city with other players.

Shadow Cities is a new location based MMORPG for iPhone. Neighborhoods and familiar streets are part of the game world that is visible to you through your iPhone. Your city is a game."
games  gaming  psychogeography  augmentedreality  iphone  mmorpg  geospatial  mobile  locative  location  pervasive  gps  shadowcities  ios  applications  location-based  location-aware  ar  from delicious
november 2010 by robertogreco
Media Surfaces: The Journey – Blog – BERG
"These little inventions have hopefully got you to your train (Arthur, remember?) on time, and in a more of a relaxed state of mind…

In one of our concept sketches below we’re exploring that first case – could your ticket be the missing jigsaw piece to the reservation stub?

A bit Willy Wonka magic ticket!…

We know that we’re going to be passing certain places at certain times, to some accuracy, during our journey.

The burgeoning amount of geo-located data about our environment means we could look to provide snippets from Wikipedia perhaps, with timings based on how they intersect with your predicted journey time – alerting you to interesting sights just as they pass by your window.

These tiny, personalised, collectable paper-spimes provide a kind of papernet augmented-reality – giving a routine journey an extra layer of wonder and interest."
berg  berglondon  papernet  paper  trains  augmentedreality  2010  displays  everyware  spimes  design  information  future  ubicomp  mediasurfaces  dentsu  transport  surfaces  mattwebb  timoarnall  jackschulze  ar  from delicious
november 2010 by robertogreco
Magic tables, not magic windows – Blog – BERG
"A while back, in 2007, I wrote about ‘a lost future’ of touch technology, and the rise of a world full of mobile glowing attention-wells.

“…it’s likely that we’re locked into pursuing very conscious, very gorgeous, deliberate touch interfaces – touch-as-manipulate-objects-on-screen rather than touch-as-manipulate-objects-in-the-world for now.”

It does look very much like we’re living in that world now – where our focus is elsewhere than our immediate surroundings – mainly residing through our fingers, in our tiny, beautiful screens."
mattjones  apple  attention  2010  flickr  nokia  touchscreen  ipad  iphone  collaboration  sharedexperience  berg  augmentedreality  games  interaction  social  mobile  devices  ux  berglondon  glowingrectangles  floatymedia  ar  from delicious
october 2010 by robertogreco
Matt Webb – What comes after mobile « Mobile Monday Amsterdam
"Matt Webb talks about how slightly smart things have invaded our lives over the past years. People have been talking about artificial intelligence for years but the promise has never really come through. Matt shows how the AI promise has transformed and now seems to be coming to us in the form of simple toys instead of complex machines. But this talks is about much more then AI, Matt also introduces chatty interfaces & hard math for trivial things."

[via: http://preoccupations.tumblr.com/post/1157711285/what-comes-after-mobile-matt-webb ]
mattwebb  berg  berglondon  future  mobile  technology  ai  design  productinvention  invention  spacebinding  timebinding  energybinding  spimes  internetofthings  anybot  ubicomp  glowcaps  geography  context  privacy  glanceableuse  cloud  embedded  chernofffaces  understanding  math  mathematics  augmentedreality  redlaser  neuralnetworks  mechanicalturk  shownar  toys  lanyrd  iot  ar  from delicious
september 2010 by robertogreco
Cognitive Load | Quiet Babylon
"This is the opposite of a cyborg implementation. These are tools that hurt cognition, break concentration, and interrupt flow. Far from leaving us free to explore, to create, to think, and to feel, they keep us trapped to manage, to maintain, to adjust, and to fiddle. It’s my belief that as long as augmented reality continues to demand our conscious attention to gee-gaws and whatsits, it’ll remain forever trapped in the world of novelty and toys.

I look forward to the backlash generation of AR. We don’t need augmented reality, we need diminished reality. I want overlays that keep the irrelevant at bay. I want augments that take care of the robot-problems unconsciously and automatically, alerting me only in the rare case that something truly novel or problematic needs my attention."
timmaly  cyborgs  augmentedreality  flow  concentration  interruptions  distraction  attention  technology  cognition  cognitiveload  ar  from delicious
september 2010 by robertogreco
Go augmented foraging with your Android phone
"A group of Dutch coders called Urban Edibles has built an "augmented foraging" application for Android phones. It's called Boskoi, and helps people find natural sources of food in urban environments.<br />
<br />
The app accesses the Urban Edibles database, which maps "wildfood" sources in Amsterdam. As such, the vast majority of information is limited to the Amsterdam area at the time of writing. However, the app allows anyone to tag any location in the world as a source of food."
android  augmentedreality  food  urban  urbanism  urbanforaging  urbanedibles  maps  mapping  boskoi  applications  ar  from delicious
september 2010 by robertogreco
jeweled platypus · text · Augmented reality for non-programmers
"When people care about the place where they live, they often end up helping make it a better place. But how do people get interested? It might help if the history of that place is brought to the surface, making its compelling stories more noticeable. A good local newspaper or blog can do this, but only if you find one and read it regularly. An augmented-reality mobile app might be able to do this instantly for anyone curious about their surroundings, but only if they have that device. What about for everyone? These are some stories about a place I like." …

"So I’d like to install some sidewalk plaques in IV! Traditional bronze markers would be very expensive (and require who knows what kind of permission and work to install), but there’s an alternative made with linoleum: messages in the style of Toynbee tiles, which are crackpot graffiti anonymously glued to asphalt roads in a few cities:"
comments  islavista  santabarbara  ucsb  brittagustafson  annotation  annotatedspeces  space  place  meaning  classideas  tcsnmy  cities  history  neighborhoods  stories  storytelling  augmentedreality  toynbeetiles  graffiti  streetart  intelligentgraffiti  noticings  local  yellowarrow  blueplaques  spaceinvader  analog  waymwaymarking  ar  arnoldtoynbee  from delicious
august 2010 by robertogreco
Near Future Laboratory » Blog Archive » When Not To Use Doorknobs
"What’s do I mean by doorknob? Doorknobs are things that rarely mean anything at all to normal human beings but they mean everything in the world to doorknob enthusiasts who spend most of their time trying to put doorknobs onto everything they possibly can — coffee tables, lampposts, patio chaises, kid’s t-shirts, wrist watches, fancy cameras, car dashboards, toasters, clock radios, keychains, tea kettles, baseball hats.. I could go on, but I’ll let the “doorknob” enthusiasts go crazy themselves.

Rarely, on occasion — someone puts a doorknob on a door because, perhaps, they lead their thinking and ideas and making with principles that focus on people and their practices before they just think of shoving doorknobs on kitten collars or broom handles."
julianbleecker  trends  augmentedreality  3d  design  respect  meaning  innovation  unoriginality  outofplace  ar  from delicious
august 2010 by robertogreco
Future Perfect » Realities Distorted
"What happens when a large reflective surface (high resolution outdoor display) is able to call upon: people and eye+ tracking; and has an ambient awareness of it’s context including a fine-grained understanding (photographs, 3D data) of its immediate surroundings; and knows your augmented reality preferences i.e. whether and how to augment. Given that what’s right for you is wrong for the next person in what contexts will this best work?

You know that feeling you get today when a text box is just a text box – no auto-complete, to spelling correction – one day you’ll feel the same twinge of frustration when you’re interacting with a surface that you mistook for a surface+."
janchipchase  displays  future  textboxes  autocomplete  spelling  eyetracking  reflective  reflectivesurfaces  augmentedreality  ar  from delicious
august 2010 by robertogreco
editions_volumiques
"What's a book to become in the 21st century post internet and network media revolution? In particular with video games, interactivity sheds a new light as to what the potential of a story can be, and what the role of the reader is. How does one introduce the connected and computational user experience of digital media into the paper book, to actualize it, widen its scope, and engage the reader in new ways?

We do not consider the e-book as the replacement of the paper book, but we wish to enrich the tangible, emotional and intimate connection that paper brings, with all the new dimensions of the digital world. Each of our projects explores a different face of this union of paper and computation.

Bertrand Duplat & Étienne Mineur"

[via: http://www.architectradure.com/2010/06/17/magic-books/] [see also: http://www.my-os.net/blog/index.php?2010/05/27/1489-les-editions-volumiques-se-devoilent ]
iphone  mobile  paper  augmentedreality  books  games  interactive  papernet  applications  bertrandduplat  étiennemineur  editionsvolumiques  ios  ar 
july 2010 by robertogreco
A Sense of Place, A World of Augmented Reality: Part 1: Places: Design Observer
"It’s not that the public became interested in nothing. They became interested in place as a zone of consumption, not production. Stripped of those meanings and relationships that were part and parcel of productive activity, everyday place became an unseen zone and we, its inhabitants, became experience addicts — constantly on the hunt for a flashier, more entertaining sensorial fix."
anthropology  ar  architecture  augmentedreality  change  city  location  media  mobilelearning  designobserver  design  future  film  reality  place  gps  geography  communications  cities  meaning  consumption  production  entertainment 
june 2010 by robertogreco
Soundtrack for a City | Quiet Babylon
"The client sits on phone, downloads soundtrack – custom for city – pulls from location API, & mixes sounds according to instructions. There’s cleverness sure, some audio gee-whizery secret sauce, all very patentable & proprietary that seamlessly pulls it together. As you make your way from uptown to downtown, tone shifts gradually, like in Mr Q’s park but moreso. Mr Q is strictly last century, he’s amateur hour hacker hobbyist. It’s laying copper when we could be putting up cell towers in Africa. Disney doesn’t know from happiest place on earth. On the server it’s all very user-friendly, very drag-n-drop. We show you map of city & your uploaded audio files. You can paint-in areas, just like Photoshop...Colour your regions & associate sounds accordingly. We crowdsourced the names of neighbourhoods from Flickr to give you suggested outlines, if you just wanna throw something together, but the real artist can paint down to the nearest half-meter."
audio  sound  ambient  cities  texture  gps  iphone  applications  rjdj  ambientawareness  location-based  soundpainting  maps  mapping  timmaly  quietbabylon  mobile  ar  ios  augmentedreality 
april 2010 by robertogreco
Omoby: Visual Search for the iPhone
"Omoby can essentially be summed up in four words: Google Goggles for iPhone. The visual search app allows you to snap a pic of any object and get back a list of convenient search results, retailer pricing, and information about that product.
iphone  search  mobile  visual  augmentedreality  api  omoby  applications  via:jessebrand  ios  ar 
march 2010 by robertogreco
Locative media - Wikipedia
"Design scholars Anne Galloway & Matt Ward state that "various online lists of pervasive computing & locative media projects draw out breadth of current classification schema: everything from mobile games, place-based storytelling, spatial annotation & networked performances to device-specific applications."
locativeart  locativemedia  alternatereality  ar  locative  socialmedia  media  gps  geography  interaction  interactive  trends  art  mobile  play  williamgibson  annegalloway  christiannold  communication  augmentedreality 
february 2010 by robertogreco
A Dream About Augmented Reality Fiction - O'Reilly Radar
"augmented reality could be an important component of a new kind of storytelling, making today's 3D entertainments as dated as silent films. Elan Lee's Fourth Wall Studios is already chipping away at barrier between storytelling & daily life. The 1st augmented reality entertainments may be text based rather than video; eventually they will likely be as immersive as my dream.

Many years ago, I saw a play in LA called Tamara, story set in mansion where WWI hero & author Gabrielle D'Annunzio was held under house arrest by Mussolini...fascinating experiment in theater...took place in many different rooms of the house. As audience member, whenever scene ended, you had an opportunity to follow the character of your choice to another room. No audience member could see entire play. My wife & I went w/ her parents (back for 3rd or 4th time, seeing parts of play they'd missed on previous visits), & afterwards, we all compared notes for hours about what we'd seen & what we'd missed."
augmentedreality  fiction  tcsnmy  writing  timoreilly  future  gabrielled'annunzio  tamara  theater  cyoa  perspective  distributed  augmentedrealityfiction  literature  interactive  if  interactivefiction  ar 
february 2010 by robertogreco
…My heart’s in Accra » Geocaching: Augmenting Reality for Enhanced Serendipity
"I love the idea of geohashing – the arbitrary nature of the algorithm has a purity to it that appeals to me. But I haven’t gone to find a hash yet. A cache implies that someone else thought a spot was worthy, in some way, to be encountered & appreciated – a hash has none of that baggage, for better or worse.

I’m interested in building structures that facilitate serendipity, because I worry that I, you & everyone else spends too much time walking familiar paths & too little time wandering in the wilderness. I worry about this in terms of news and information most often, wondering how we find ways to filter the rich information flows of the Internet without filtering out the unfamiliar & provocative. I’ve been making the case that we should stumble into unfamiliar territory because it’s good for us. But that’s about as effective as telling me that I should hike because I’m fat. Perhaps someone (me?) needs to start hiding caches of rubber ducks in strategic corners of the Internet."

[later: http://artichoke.typepad.com/arti_choke/2010/02/i-worry-about-a-world-with-less-risk.html ]
ethanzuckerman  geocaching  geohashing  augmentedreality  serendipity  tcsnmy  discovery  travel  projectideas  glvo  web  internet  artichokeblog  pamhook  ar 
february 2010 by robertogreco
russell davies: playful
"These aren't games, like the industry thinks of games, these are something a little less, these are Barely Games. And these, are what I wanted to talk about.
pretending  play  games  gaming  russelldavies  creativity  barelygames  planning  thinking  futures  design  competition  noticing  playful09  collections  collecting  tcsnmy  negotiating  negotiation  inattention  iphone  gamechanging  glvo  attention  augmentedreality  augmentedrealityfiction  ar 
november 2009 by robertogreco
BLDGBLOG: Phantom City
"Cheng+Snyder's free download opens up a new kind of historical spectating: architectural tourism of the unbuilt. Perhaps someday we'll be done with monographs, traveling exhibitions, and even senior thesis reviews; we'll simply upload all our projects into the Phantom City and let the world decide their worth. Crowds of tourists mill about on 13th Street, looking around at the imaginary buttresses of a superstructure you've spent three years digitally assembling.

Download the app via the iTunes store and see for yourself."
art  culture  architecture  future  history  books  cities  bldgblog  maps  mapping  iphone  nyc  local  interface  geography  augmentedreality  applications  phantomcity  ios  ar 
october 2009 by robertogreco
Noisy Decent Graphics: The Hidden Park - iPhone game
"It's an ambitious game that uses the iPhone's GPS, the camera and the speaker to create a sort of ARGish geo-cachingish mash up for families. You pick a park, head down there with the kids and run around solving clues and puzzles and trying to find the magical creatures...The best bit as far as the kids were concerned were these brilliant little photos created by standing in exactly the right spot...It seems to make sense in an emerging post-digital world. It takes something you can't do on a screen (going outside and run round a park) and merges it with something you can't do with twigs or paper (animate creatures over pictures etc). But also it takes the best bits of those worlds, going to the park is a good fun thing and gps and camera etc uses the best of the iPhone. That's smart and importantly it doesn't feel forced or false. Throw in gaming on the top and you've got a very interesting mix."
iphone  applications  games  gaming  arg  children  thehiddenpark  via:preoccupations  gps  augmentedreality  location  play  outdoors  videogames  geocaching  ios  ar 
september 2009 by robertogreco
Big cities prove apt for apps - CNN.com
"It's a good time to have an iPhone, be moderately geeky and live in New York. That's because loads of iPhone apps have come out that make the urban experience more rewarding. And it's not just iPhone apps. A slew of tech offerings are improving life, work, and getting around in big cities.
maps  urbanism  urbancomputing  augmented  cities  applications  iphone  augmentedreality  mobile  government  data  via:adamgreenfield  ios  ar 
september 2009 by robertogreco
Chromaroma « Mudlark
"Chromaroma is our first social game. A pervasive online game played in the real world.
masstransit  urban  games  gaming  pervasive  arg  social  augmentedreality  play  mudlark  ar 
july 2009 by robertogreco
acrossair | Nearest Tube Augmented Reality iPhone 3GS App
"One of the first augmented reality apps to go live in the iPhone AppStore. Forget boring 2D tube maps! Try this amazing new application that tells New Yorkers where their nearest subway station is via their iPhones video function.

When you load the app, holding it flat, all 33 lines of the New York Subway are displayed in coloured arrows. By tilting the phone upwards, you will see the nearest stations: what direction they are in relation to your location, how many miles away they are and what lines they are on. If you continue to tilt the phone upwards, you will see stations further away, as stacked icons. Only available to Apple iPhone 3GS users."
augmentedreality  iphone  applications  nyc  subways  maps  mapping  ios  ar 
july 2009 by robertogreco
YouTube - Nearest Tube Augmented Reality App for iPhone 3GS from acrossair [see also: http://www.acrossair.com/apps_nearesttube.htm]
"acrossair, the makers of the TVGuide.co.uk iPhone app bring you Nearest Tube one of the first augmented reality apps to go live in the iPhone AppStore. Forget boring 2D tube maps! Try this amazing new application that tells Londoners where their nearest tube station is via their iPhones video function.
augmentedreality  iphone  applications  location  geolocation  underground  london  gps  compass  via:blackbeltjones  ios  ar 
july 2009 by robertogreco
Near Future Laboratory » Design Fiction Chronicles: Aram Bartholl’s Vision of Augmented Reality
"Aram’s project, in my mind, playfully pokes at the vision of a near future world of such things augmenting our daily, pedestrian realities. I’m a bit skeptical when it comes to the levels of alteration to quotidian life by glasses that tell you compass bearings or map sites of interest. All that kind of stuff that would turn spatial experiences into some kind of database inquiry seem very much different from what I enjoy about the world when it is mixed with humans — curious interpretations of objects and moments that are not salted with uniform resource locators, pop-ups, soft synthesized voices telling me that I’ve got mail or to turn right at the next intersection. Sometimes, I like getting a bit lost, or learning my way about a new place."
arambartholl  augmentedreality  humor  julianbleecker  ar 
april 2009 by robertogreco
iPhone RFID: object-based media [via: http://vimeo.com/4147129]
"This is a prototype of an iPhone media player that uses physical objects to control media playback. It is based on Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) that triggers various iPhone interactions when in the range of a wireless tag embedded inside a physical object. ... RFID is becoming more common in mobile phones (under the term Near Field Communication or NFC) from manufacturers such as Nokia. By looking at Apple’s patents we know that the technology is being considered for the iPhone. With the iPhone SDK 3.0 external hardware accessories can be accessed by iPhone software, so third party RFID or NFC readers are also possible. ... Compared to other mobile handsets the iPhone is a particularly media-friendly device, with a large, bright screen and high quality audiovisual playback. What if this screen could act as a ‘lens’ to content that resides in the world?"
nfc  via:timo  iphone  ubicomp  rfid  mobile  augmentedreality  concepts  touch  ar 
april 2009 by robertogreco
Inside the GPS Revolution: 10 Applications That Make the Most of Location
"Inside the GPS revolution it's more than maps and driving directions: location-aware phones and apps now deliver the hidden information that lets users make connections and interact with the world in ways they never imagined. The future is here and it's in your pocket." See also: http://www.wired.com/gadgets/wireless/magazine/17-02/lp_guineapig?currentPage=all
iphone  android  applications  mobile  phones  gps  location-based  augmentedreality  location  ios  ar 
january 2009 by robertogreco
Hyperlinking the Real World - ReadWriteWeb
"This project goes beyond today's mapping applications like Google's Street View, for example, which first identifies your location either via GPS or triangulation and then shows you pictures of that area. Instead, MOBVIS actually lets you "see" the world through your mobile phone. This is computer vision, or rather, mobile vision."
augmentedreality  maps  location  location-based  geolocation  urbanism  mobile  mobvis  readwriteweb  trends  ar 
january 2009 by robertogreco
Digital Pictures Interactive » Blog Archive » Papervision - Augmented Reality
"Using a webcam and flash, we’ve taken our Papervision character from the desktop to the desk. A new and exciting way to interact with your flash content. The possibilities are wide open. Try it for yourself below: 1. Download and print this symbol 2. Allow flash access to your webcam below when it asks (or right click flash and select settings). 3. Point your webcam at the printed symbol, and the character will appear on top."
visualization  graphics  augmentedreality  tracking  3d  interactive  fun  digital  animation  interface  video  webcam  papervision3d  papervision  ar 
november 2008 by robertogreco
Bruce Sterling, "Computer Entertainment," Flurb #6
"And that’s why they ambush you and they beat on you. They’re not exactly your enemies, but they’re deeply alien to your chosen paradigm. So they have a kind of control over your destiny that you do not allow yourselves to have." ... and ... "Someday the computer entertainment industry would be big. Big enough, and stodgy enough, that it actually WOULD employ towel designers. There would be oceans of money and huge budgets on an industrial scale. There would be room for armies of creative guys who actually did create towels."
brucesterling  videogames  futurism  futurology  augmentedreality  sciencefiction  technology  design  future  games  gamedesign  gaming  entertainment  mmorpg  scifi  ubicomp  ar 
september 2008 by robertogreco
Open the Future: Making the Visible Invisible
"an augmented reality world that really takes off will out of necessity be one that offers freedom of use closer to that of the Internet than of the iPhone...An AR world dominated by closed, controlled systems will be safe, but have a limited impact...instead of just blocking advertisers, I wanted to block out the people who annoyed me...The flip side of "show me everything I want to know about the world" is "don't show me anything I don't want to know."
future  futurism  metaverse  visualization  augmentedreality  open  closed  iphone  innovation  jamaiscascio  adblocking  filtering  spam  via:blackbeltjones  interface  ubicomp  attention  gps  maps  ar 
august 2008 by robertogreco
Gamers turn cities into a battleground - 12 June 2005 - New Scientist
"But ultimately, urban games may encourage a generation of console geeks to get off the sofa. "I have literally run around a park interacting with virtual creatures," says Hilton. "I'm going to have to get seriously fit if I want to develop one game I'm w
urban  location  mobile  augmentedreality  arg  gaming  games  play  urbanism  mososo  pervasive  interactive  geolocation  gps  cities  technology  phones  ar 
june 2008 by robertogreco

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