robertogreco + aaronrose   5

What To Do Instead of Calling the Police — Aaron Rose
"We’ve all been there. Your neighbor is setting off fireworks at 3am. Or there’s a couple fighting outside your window and it’s getting physical. Or you see someone hit their child in public. What do you do? Your first instinct might be: call 911. That’s what many people are trained to do in the United States when we see something dangerous or threatening happening.

At this point, most of us understand that, in the U.S., the police uphold of system of racialized violence and white supremacy, in which black people are at least three times more likely to be killed by the police. For years now, we’ve heard the nearly daily news of another unarmed person of color being shot by the police. When the police get involved, black people, Latinx people, Native Americans, people of color, LGBTQ people, sex workers, women, undocumented immigrants, and people living with disabilities and mental health diagnoses are usually in more danger, even if they are the victims of the crime being reported. Police frequently violently escalate peaceful interactions, often without repercussions. In 2017, the police killed over 1,100 people in the U.S.

So what do you do? When you see harm being done, when you worry for your safety, when you feel your rights are being violated? What do you do instead of calling the police? How do you keep yourself safe without seeking protection from a system whose default is still surveillance and erasure of others?

We start by shifting our perspective. We start by learning about the racist history of the police. We start by saying, an alternative to this system should exist. We start by pausing before we dial 911. We start by making different choices where we can. We start by getting to know our neighbors and asking them to be a part of this process.

The following is an in-process list of resources on alternatives to policing, which range from the theoretical to practical. It starts with a series of best practices and guiding questions I have developed in the last two years of nurturing this document in conversation with many people.

* * *

A FEW FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS:
Who is this document for? This document is for anyone who wants to build a world where we have safe, strong communities. Where we know and trust our neighbors. Where our response to emergencies of all kinds leads to peace and connection rather than escalated violence and disconnection. This document was originally written to expand white people’s understanding of police violence and to equip them with the tools to be better community members, and the best practices and guiding questions reflect that. However, the resources and tools are here for people of all races and backgrounds.

Who are you? I’m a white, middle-class, life-long New Yorker and south Brooklynite. I’m a gay, queer, transgender man. I’m an educator, a writer, and a diversity & inclusion consultant and coach. I help build cultures where people of all identities can thrive as themselves and collaborate together.

How can I recommend an edit, report a broken link, contribute a resource, or share my perspective? Email me at hello@aaronxrose.com. I welcome any and all feedback given in service of building a safer world. "
aaronrose  nonviolence  police  community  safety  race  racism  policing  alternative 
april 2018 by robertogreco
Steidl: New and Used by Marc Joseph
"Growing up in Ohio in the 1970s, photographer Marc Joseph was first exposed to art, writing and music in the eccentric smaller book and record shops of downtown Cleveland. Most Saturday afternoons were spent combing through the stacks in anticipation of a major future purchase… This was the beginning of Joseph’s permanent fascination with books and records — both as public artworks and as formative private experiences. New and Used is a collection of richly detailed color photographs of hardcovers, paperbacks, LPs, CDs and cassettes, either shelved, piled, boxed and stacked in their natural environments — independent book and record shops — or individually silhouetted like artifacts pinned into shadow boxes. Together with editor Damon Krukowski, the artist has assembled a collection of short fiction, prose, poems and personal essays… Lydia Davis, Stephen Elliott, Shelley Jackson, Jonathan Lethem, Thurston Moore, Eileen Myles, Bob Nickas, Aaron Rose, Jeremy Sigler, Stephanie Snyder…"
nicktosches  iansvenonius  stephenelliott  shelleyjackson  jonathanlethem  thirstonmoore  wileenmyles  stephaniesnyder  jeremysigler  aaronrose  bobnickas  2006  lydiadavis  damonkrukowski  toread  photography  records  books  marcjoseph  from delicious
august 2012 by robertogreco
Levi's® Workshops: Sister Corita on Vimeo
"Directed by Peter Rhoads

Sister Corita was a remarkable, fire-breathing Catholic nun who, during the course of her neverending fight for social justice, gave artistic legitimacy to screenprinting. Filmmaker Aaron Rose, along with the Corita Foundation's Sasha Carrera, set out to show that–even though she's gone–this beloved teacher-printer's message and medium resonate today more than ever."

[Posted here: http://tcsnmy7.tumblr.com/post/3643305776/i-recommend-watching-this-short-video-about-sister ]
sistercorita  aaronrose  peterrhoads  screenprinting  coritakent  from delicious
july 2011 by robertogreco
Breaking A Habit: Sister Corita - NOWNESS
"Aaron Rose's Documentary On the Nun Who Stormed the Art World

If The Sound of Music and Sister Act taught us anything, it was that Catholic nuns are expected to pray and sing, in that order. But the story of Sister Mary Corita Kent rewrites that script. A teacher at Immaculate Heart College in Los Angeles from 1947 to 1968, Sister Corita was a Pop Art pioneer. Her silkscreen prints created an arresting new visual language for spirituality in the early 60s, praising the Almighty by co-opting typograpy, advertising slogans and the bright colors of billboards and local streets. Though she would often work in collaboration with her students—who she encouraged to mount group exhibitions such as 1965’s decidedly anti-Vietnam Christmas show, "Peace On Earth"—she would spend each August creating her own art work…"

[Posted here: http://tcsnmy7.tumblr.com/post/3643416683/breaking-a-habit-sister-corita ]
sistercorita  teaching  art  immaculateheartcollege  immaculateheartcommunity  aaronrose  documentary  learning  noticing  seeing  observation  eames  design  tcsnmy7  coritakent  from delicious
july 2011 by robertogreco
Beautiful Losers film trailer on Vimeo
"Beautiful Losers celebrates the spirit behind one of the most influential cultural movements of a generation. In the early 1990's a loose-knit group of likeminded outsiders found common ground at a little NYC storefront gallery. Rooted in the DIY (do-it-yourself) subcultures of skateboarding, surf, punk, hip hop & graffiti, they made art that reflected the lifestyles they led. Developing their craft with almost no influence from the "establishment" art world, this group, and the subcultures they sprang from, have now become a movement that has been transforming pop culture. Starring a selection of artists who are considered leaders within this culture, Beautiful Losers focuses on the telling of personal stories...speaking to themes of what happens when the outside becomes "in" as it explores the creative ethos connecting these artists and today's youth."
beautifullosers  film  documentary  skateboarding  art  illustration  graffiti  streetart  design  learning  diy  identity  glvo  creativity  youth  biography  mikemills  barrymcgee  margaretkillgallen  harmonykorine  aaronrose  edtempleton  jojackson  deannatempleton  stephenpowers  thomascampbell  cheryldunn  chrisjohanson  geoffmcfetridge  shepardfairey  skating  skateboards 
august 2008 by robertogreco

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