Stefan Collini reviews ‘Quite a Good Time to Be Born’ by David Lodge and ‘Lives in Writing’ by David Lodge · LRB 19 February 2015
"One of the many passages Lodge quotes from his own earlier writing is his playful parody, in The British Museum Is Falling Down, of Molly Bloom’s final, epically unpunctuated soliloquy at the end of Ulysses, where he has his own female character shift the register from Molly’s joyous, sexual ‘I said yes’ to an altogether more hesitant, sceptical ‘I said perhaps.’ Reading this again I said alright it was a nice idea but repeating it seems a bit like showing off or just not being able to think of anything so inspired these days not that I mind much and anyway its alright to do this because he is so cherished now and no one wants to say anything bad about him and thats alright because he is a good thing and over the years he has made me laugh and can still make me smile a bit and anyway its only an autobiography and its alright to go on a bit about yourself there in fact it wouldn’t work if you didn’t really but even so I wanted to say to him that its not really very good but I didnt quite have the heart and perhaps Im only disappointed because I used to enjoy him a lot when I was younger and when he was younger too and perhaps its never quite as good when youre older only alright and so thats what I said about his book I said it was alright though it isnt really but thats alright."
LRB  2015  book_reviews 
6 hours ago
Alleyways of language: regional words for ‘alleyway’ | OxfordWords blog
RT @UnlikelyWorlds: Re Macfarlane's piece, there are some urban equivalents to feadan, amil, smeuse etc - We need more, maybe.
English  language  words  2014 
7 hours ago
ТВЦ опубликовал запись с зафиксировавшей убийство Бориса Немцова камеры
RT : Isn't that interesting: city snow-removal truck slowly drives next to Nemtsov on bridge, blocks moment of shooting.
from twitter
20 hours ago
Boris Nemtsov: Why does Putin wage war with Ukraine?
RT : Murder of Boris Nemtsov is the Donbass war coming to Moscow. Read what he wrote on the aggression against Ukraine.
from twitter
23 hours ago
The word-hoard: Robert Macfarlane on rewilding our language of landscape | Books | The Guardian
"The beauty of this variant surely has to do with the paradox of thaw figured as restraint or retention, and the wintry notion that cold, frost and snow might themselves be a form of gift – an addition to the landscape that will in time be subtracted by warmth." "we increasingly make do with an impoverished language for landscape. A place literacy is leaving us. A language in common, a language of the commons, is declining. Nuance is evaporating from everyday usage, burned off by capital and apathy. The substitutions made in the Oxford Junior Dictionary – the outdoor and the natural being displaced by the indoor and the virtual – are a small but significant symptom of the simulated screen life many of us live. The terrain beyond the city fringe is chiefly understood in terms of large generic units (“field”, “hill”, “valley”, “wood”). It has become a blandscape. We are blasé, in the sense that Georg Simmel used that word in 1903, meaning “indifferent to the distinction between things”." "It matters because language deficit leads to attention deficit. As we deplete our ability to denote and figure particular aspects of our places, so our competence for understanding and imagining possible relationships with non-human nature is correspondingly depleted."
Robert_Macfarlane  words  language  terroir  terrain  landscape  English  Guardian  2015  attention  knowledge  nature  Wendell_Berry  Other 
yesterday
Russia robbed of a brave, authentic and distinctive voice | World news | The Guardian
Boris Nemtsov … Russia robbed of a brave, authentic and distinctive voice —
from twitter
yesterday
Борис Немцов: Боюсь того, что Путин меня убьет | Собеседник.ру
RT : Just weeks before his murder tonight, Nemtsov told an interviewer, "I'm scared that Putin will kill me."
from twitter
yesterday
BBC Radio 3 - Through the Night, Pratum Integrum
RT : World premiere of Messiaen's Quartet for the End of Time was 15/1/1941, Stalag VIII-A POW camp
from twitter
yesterday
Tim Cook’s interview in The Telegraph – tidbits and the important part | Apple Spotlight
"Cook said that it is clear that there are many instances of people’s information being “trafficked around” and that this is something his company abhorred. At the moment, however, consumers often “don’t fully understand what is going on", he added. "One day they will, and will be very offended. … None of us should accept that the government or a company or anybody should have access to all of our private information. This is a basic human right. We all have a right to privacy. We shouldn't give it up. We shouldn't give in to scare-mongering or to people who fundamentally don’t understand the details. … History has taught us that privacy breaches have resulted in very dire consequences. You don’t have to look back too far or be a historian to see these things. They are readily apparent. … Terrorists will encrypt. They know what to do. If we don’t encrypt, the people we affect [by cracking down on privacy] are the good people. They are the 99.999pc of people who are good." … Cook’s concern doesn’t merely extend to governments: he doesn’t want big private companies to be able to snoop either. “If you want to keep your health personal, you shouldn't have to share it with your insurance company. These things are not meant to be on some bulletin board somewhere”. Privacy is central to Apple's belief system, Cook argues, and he is clearly prepared to fight on this issue. He believes that opinion in Europe on this is probably closer to his position than opinion in the US. “You don't want to eliminate everyone’s privacy. If you do, you not only don’t solve the terrorist issue but you also take away something that is a human right. The consequences of doing that are very significant.” … “We don’t make money selling your information to somebody else. We don’t think you want that. We don’t want to do that. It’s not in our values system to do that. Could we make a lot of money doing that? Of course. But life isn’t about money, life is about doing the right thing. This has been a core value of our company for a long time.” … “The issue becomes when you begin to observe everything people are doing: read their emails, read their messages, monitor their browsing habits, really study everything about them and then connect the dots about these things.” Relatively minor pieces of information, added together, become greater than the sums of their parts. “Some companies are not transparent that the connection of these data points produces five other things that you didn’t know that you gave up. It becomes a gigantic trove of data.” … “We are not a treasure trove of data. It is a cop-out to say: choose between privacy or security. There is no reason why customers should have to select one. There is no reason not to have both.” He believes that in their hearts of hearts, even the security services, who usually try to restrict people’s independence, would agree that eliminating privacy won’t work. “If they are really honest, they know that withholding encryption will penalise good people, not put a barrier up for bad people. There is no trade-off. It fundamentally doesn’t work. There has to be other solutions.”"
Telegraph  interview  Tim_Cook  Apple  2015  privacy  security  encryption  war_on_terror  terrorism 
yesterday
BBC Radio 3 - The Essay, Fear Itself, Temple Grandin
Terrific talk on Radio 3 by Temple Grandin on fear, cattle & animal welfare: . Tomorrow, Raymond Tallis on human fear!
from twitter
2 days ago
Martin Rowson on MPs' outside earnings – cartoon | Comment is free | The Guardian
Martin Rowson on MPs' outside earnings – cartoon | Comment is free | The Guardian
from twitter
3 days ago
iTunes - Films - Winter Sleep
Finally, ‘Winter Sleep’ available (pre-order) on iTunes: . Still awaiting ‘Citizenfour’ & ‘The Look of Silence’.
from twitter
3 days ago
Game-playing software holds lessons for neuroscience : Nature News & Comment
DeepMind (again): Game-playing software holds lessons for neuroscience : Nature News & Comment —
Nature  2015  Demis_Hassabis  Google  AI  DeepMind 
3 days ago
The city that privatised itself to death | Ian Martin | Politics | The Guardian
‘I wonder what in 100 years from now it will be, London. The city that privatised itself to death.’ —
from twitter
3 days ago
Observer review: Unfinest Hour by Brendan Simms | Books | The Guardian
RT : Time to re-read superb review of Brendan Simms' 'Unfinest Hour' on Rifkind, Hurd and Bosnia catastrophe
from twitter
4 days ago
U B U W E B - Film & Video: John Cage "For The Third Time"
RT : John Cage speaks about the techniques he used in "Writing Through Finnegans Wake" (1977):
from twitter
4 days ago
The Paradox of Empathy | Scott Jenson

Designers will be the first to admit that not every empathic observation leads to a miraculous insight. However, it’s called “Design Thinking” for a reason: it’s how we process and explore, taking a complex problem and breaking it down before we build it back up. Product managers seem to expect a designer to walk up to a product, say something brilliant, and drop the mic. Experienced designers deeply understand a simple fact: design isn’t a deliverable, it’s a process. A process paved with dozens of small empathic observations that lead you, slowly, iteratively to a better product.
design  empathy  design_thinking  2015  Scott_Jenson 
4 days ago
Interview: Bruce Sterling on the Convergence of Humans and Machines « NextNature.net
"There will not be a Singularity. I think that artificial intelligence is a bad metaphor. It is not the right way to talk about what is happening. So, I like to use the terms “cognition” and “computation”. Cognition is something that happens in brains, physical, biological brains. Computation is a thing that happens with software strings on electronic tracks that are inscribed out of silicon and put on fibre board."
interview  Bruce_Sterling  2015  machines  AI  cognition  singularity  computation 
4 days ago
John James Audubon's Birds of America | Audubon
RT : You can now download high-res John James Audubon Birds of America prints for free:
from twitter
5 days ago
Rebecca Rideal on Twitter: "Before smart phones, watches pissed people off. Pepys, 1665: http://t.co/GVl0Hiypub"
https://twitter.com/cliffmanning/status/559347791630434304
cliff manning (@cliffmanning)
25/01/2015 13:51
Distraction, connection anxiety and wearable tech have been problematic since the 1600s / Pepys pic.twitter.com/iuWEuXyp7j via @RebeccaRideal
1665  Pepys  distraction  watches  attention  wearables  17hC 
6 days ago
The Saturday Night Armistice (1995) - 22nd July 1995 - YouTube
RT : Just remembered 's Drinking Club of Jack Straw Fans. 16'20" into this from 1995. It's amazing.
from twitter
6 days ago
Ex-ministers Jack Straw and Sir Malcolm Rifkind brag to business about their political contacts - Telegraph
RT : Ex-ministers Jack Straw and Sir Malcolm Rifkind brag to business about their political contacts.
from twitter
6 days ago
Log In - The New York Times
RT : Indications that Russia is training people for terror attacks in Ukraine. Today explosion in Kharkiv.
from twitter
6 days ago
Christopher Alexander - Patterns in Architecture - YouTube
RT : Alexander's 'Sofware eats the world' talk.OOPLSA '96.Years before said it. The most impt software talk ever?
from twitter
7 days ago
iTunes - Music - Philip Glass: A Brief History of Time (Soundtrack to the film by Errol Morris) by Philip Glass
RT : Yes! After 24 years, the Philip Glass score of ' A BRIEF HISTORY OF TIME (1991) has been released today!
from twitter
7 days ago
27 charts that explain how we die - Vox
‘The difficulty of dying in America: Death has gone from being a sudden event to an extremely gradual one.’ —
from twitter
7 days ago
Misunderstanding the present: Ed Miliband wants to govern a country that doesn’t exist
1/ John Gray in the New Statesman on Miliband: . Provoking and incisive as ever.
from twitter
7 days ago
Guildhall school dismissed girl's claims 30 years before Philip Pickett jailed | UK news | The Guardian
Very shocked by the news about Philip Pickett, . S/o I admired and respected for his work in music. Dreadful crimes.
from twitter
8 days ago
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