Could the Furosemide Stress Test clarify resuscitative goals? | Josh Farkas | PulmCrit | 16 July 2018
The furosemide stress test (FST) is a protocolized furosemide challenge, which has been shown to predict whether patients are likely to progress towards advanced AKI and dialysis.
7 hours ago
The Strange and Curious Case of the Deadly Superbug Yeast | Maryn McKenna | Wired | 13 July 18
Candida auris — a pathogen that resists almost all of the drugs developed to treat or kill it is moving rapidly across the world, and public health experts are stymied how to stop it.
17 hours ago
Melatonin: Much More Than You Want To Know | Scott Alexander | Slate Star Codex | 10 July 2018
The neurohormone Melatonin, sold freely as a dietary supplement in America, is an effective sleeping pill. “My totally unprincipled guess is that melatonin is about half as strong as Ambien. It also has about a hundred times fewer side effects, so there’s definitely a place for it in sleep medicine”. The optimal dose is 0.3 milligrams. Steer clear of the 10mg pills sold at pharmacies. High doses of Melatonin stay in your system all day, and your body just gets used to it
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5 days ago
Is America Ready for a Global Pandemic? | Ed Yong | The Atlantic | 02 July 2018
The epidemics of the early 21st century revealed a world unprepared, even as the risks continue to multiply. Much worse is coming.
6 days ago
Standoff | Jamie Thompson | Dallas Morning News | 02 February 2018
How the Dallas SWAT team cornered and killed the July 7 police shooter
7 days ago
The Obsessive Search for the Tasmanian Tiger | Brooke Jarvis | New Yorker | 02 July 2018
Like the dodo and the great auk, the Tasmanian tiger is more renowned for the tragedy of its death than for its life, about which little is known. Enthusiasts hope it will be a Lazarus species—an animal considered lost but then found.
9 days ago
How the Dallas Cowboys Built a World-Class Art Collection for Their Fans | Felix Salmon | Departures | 29 June 2018
Dallas Cowboys owners Gene and Jerry Jones built a world-class art collection not for themselves but for 2 million fans.
9 days ago
The Miraculous True Story of the Dog Who Lived | Eric Wagenknecht & Tess Strokes | Outside | 05 July 2018
It was just another beautiful day in the mountains for the author and his one-year-old Australian shepherd, Merle, when their lives changed in an instant
9 days ago
The Hunt for Wonder Drugs at the North Pole | Kea Krause | The Atlantic | 17 April 2018
In a race against antibiotic resistance, a Norwegian research team sails into the Arctic darkness
10 days ago
The Real Story of Donald Trump Jr. | GQ | Julia Ioffe | 27 June 2018
All he ever wanted was to make his dad proud, but things have never turned out quite right for Donald Trump Jr. Even now, despite finding his purpose as a bombastic star of the far right, Junior’s personal life is in shambles and the specter of Robert Mueller looms large.
14 days ago
The Strange Brain Of The Solo Climber | J.B. MacKinnon | Nautilus | 28 June 2018
Alex Honnold scales sheer rock faces, thousands of feet high, without ropes or protective equipment of any kind. He may be history’s greatest-ever free solo climber. To call him fearless is not just a figure of speech. His brain does have an amygdala, a “fear centre”, but MRI scans show that nothing seems to activate it. “Where there is no activation, there probably is no threat response. Honnold really could be feeling no fear up there. None at all. None whatsoever”
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14 days ago
The Surprising History (and Future) of Fingerprints | Chantel Tattoli | The Paris Review | 15 May 2018
Scientists describe the basic patterns of fingerprints in terms of arches, whorls, and loops. (Seventy percent of a fingerprint is made up of loops.) Closer features include dots, lakes, islands, spurs, crossings, and bifurcations. It is true that every print is unique to every finger, even for identical twins, who share the same genetic code. Fingerprints are formed by friction from touching the walls of our mother’s womb. Sometimes they are called “chanced impressions.”
16 days ago
Consider The Lemur | Katherine Rundell | LRB | 28 June 2018
“It is probably best not to take advice direct from the animal kingdom – but lemurs are, I think, an exception. They live in matriarchal troops, with an alpha female at their head. When ring-tailed lemurs are cold or frightened, or when they want to bond, they group together in a furry mass known as a lemur ball. They intertwine their tails and paws, and press against one another’s walnut-sized swiftly beating hearts. To see it feels like an injunction of sorts: to find a lemur ball of one’s own”
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17 days ago
pH-guided fluid resuscitation & BICAR-ICU | Josh Farkas | PulmCrit | 27 June 2018
The fact that bicarbonate appears to be clinically beneficial further bolsters the concept that NAGMA is detrimental. Essentially, the BICAR-ICU trial is the flip side of the SMART and SALT-ED trials.
medicine 
17 days ago
How To Get Away With Fraud | Dan Davies | The Guardian | 28 June 2018
“The way most white-collar crime works is by manipulating institutional psychology. That means creating something that looks as much as possible like a normal set of transactions. The drama comes later, when it all unwinds. One point that comes up again and again when looking at famous and large-scale frauds is that everything could have been brought to a halt at a very early stage if anyone had taken care to confirm all the facts. But nobody does. There are just too bloody many of them”
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17 days ago
An Expensive Way To Fight ISIS | William Langewiesche | The Atlantic | 28 June 2018
Deadpan, action-packed account of one night last year when America sent three B-2 stealth bombers to flatten 100 ISIS fighters in the Libyan desert. “The plan was for the B-2s to drop a 500-pound bomb on every one of those fighters. The idea of using Air Force heavy bombers prevailed because of their ability to deliver dozens of self-steering, individually targeted bombs; then to linger in the vicinity, waiting for surveillance assessments from the drones; and if necessary to deliver more bombs”
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17 days ago
Hospitalism | Sarah Perry | LRB | 27 June 2018
On the career of Joseph Lister, 19C surgeon, pioneer of antiseptics, and, by his own account “the only man who ever stuck a knife in Queen Victoria.” In Lister’s day, a maverick doctor was free to experiment. “Treating a child whose leg had been shattered by a cart, he faced a choice: whether to amputate to forestall the inevitable gangrene, or to test his theory that carbolic acid could prevent infection. Lister put carbolic acid to the test. Some weeks later the boy walked out of the hospital”
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18 days ago
Methylene Blue Infusions | Steve Curry | Tox and Hound | 22 June 2018
Continuous Methylene Blue Infusions for Treating Recurrent Methemoglobinemia
medicine 
19 days ago
A Rattle With Death | Kyle Dickman | Outside | 20 June 2018
What it’s like to get bitten by a very large rattlesnake. “Each of the half-dozen doctors I saw told me this was either the first snakebite they’d ever seen or the worst. Poison Control, which the nurses called every two hours, guided my care. My leg, from toe to hip, turned black and yellow and eventually swelled to 24 inches, more than twice its normal circumference. My blood chemistry mimicked a pattern the nurses compared to that of drug-overdose patients”
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22 days ago
This Is A Nuclear Bomb | Alex Wellerstein & Ferris Jabr | New York | 12 June 2018
How terrorists might smuggle a nuclear bomb into New York, and what would happen if they detonated it. “A ten-kiloton bomb would be only seven feet long and weigh about 1,000 pounds. It would be simple to transport such a device to America aboard a container ship, just another unseen object in a giant metal box among millions of other metal boxes floating on the ocean. Even a moderate amount of shielding would be enough to hide its radioactive signature from most detectors at shipping hubs”
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27 days ago
Curiosity and What Equality Really Means | Atul Gawande | New Yorker | 02 June 2018
"Most of all, you will be given trust to see human beings at their most vulnerable and serve them. That trust is earned because of your values, your commitment to serving all as equals, and your openness to people’s humanity. The renewal of these values is why we’re all so grateful to be here—and so grateful that you will carry those values on, beyond us."
29 days ago
Forty-Five Things I Learned In The Gulag | Vladimir Shalamov | Paris Review | 12 June 2018
Notes from 15 years in Soviet labour camps. “A man becomes a beast in three weeks, given heavy labor, cold, hunger, and beatings The main means for depraving the soul is the cold.” “There is only enough flesh on a hungry man for anger: everything else leaves him indifferent”. “The world should be divided not into good and bad people but into cowards and non-cowards. Ninety-five percent of cowards are capable of the vilest things, lethal things, at the mildest threat”
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4 weeks ago
Mutually Nonconsensual Sex | Caitlin Flanagan | The Atlantic | 01 June 2018
“Is it possible for two people to simultaneously sexually assault each other? This is the question — rife with legal, anatomical, and emotional improbabilities — to which the University of Cincinnati now addresses itself, and with some urgency. The one important thing you need to know about the case is that according to the lawsuit, a woman has been indefinitely suspended from college because she let a man touch her vagina. What kind of sexually repressive madness could have allowed for this to happen?”
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4 weeks ago
Monty Hall In The Wild | Jacob Falkovich | Put A Number On It | 03 June 2018
Let’s assume you are familiar with the problem — if not, it is explained here, and you will never be able to unthink it. This is about pigeons. “You know who does really well on the Monty Hall problem? Pigeons. At least, pigeons quickly learn to switch doors when the game is repeated multiple times and they can observe that switching doors is twice as likely to yield the prize. You know who fails miserably at playing the iterated Monty Hall game? Humans. While pigeons quickly converge on switching always, humans don’t learn at all”
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5 weeks ago
Loose Ends | Cameron Walker | Last Word On Nothing | 05 June 2018
How to tie shoelaces. “The very action of running creates enough force on shoelaces to make that sweet little bow you tied fall apart, sometimes in a matter of seconds. There is a way to tie a single knot that makes it less likely to fail. The reef knot, or square knot, holds laces more securely than the granny knot. The easy give-away is that if you tie your laces and the bow turns so that it runs along your shoe, rather than across the top of your shoe, you’re likely tying a granny knot”
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5 weeks ago
Promises | Whitney Lee | Rumpus | 22 May 2018
An obstetrician recounts an emergency delivery on Mother’s Day. “Inside Lisa’s body, the arteries that connected her uterus and her placenta, the source of oxygen, to her baby, were shearing apart. Blood surged from both maternal and fetal vessels and spilled into her uterus, which clamped down like a vice in protest. This contraction was the source in Lisa’s unrelenting pain. Like all pregnant women, a half a liter of blood flowed through Lisa’s uterine vessels per minute. The bleeding was torrential. She and Jonah were hemorrhaging to death”
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6 weeks ago
Drawing a Line in the Sand Over River Rights | Chris Colin | Outside | 30 May 2018
Take a canoe trip down America’s most scenic rivers and you will find that many riversides are claimed as “private” by local residents. They are not. The banks of navigable rivers are public up to the high watermark, and “navigable” includes navigable by tourists. Property deeds are irrelevant. But try telling that to the locals. “Throughout my journey, I heard a common refrain from homeowners: that they weren’t trying to keep neighbors away, just outsiders. The species of outsider varied”
6 weeks ago
First Person: A 911 Dispatcher | Rachael Herron | Vox | 31 May 2018
“Of course people should call 911 if it’s an actual emergency. But think before you call the cops to handle your feelings about a barbecue, or where someone is parked, or if they’re playing music on a Saturday afternoon. I’ve answered at least a quarter of a million 911 calls in my career. Amid the meaningless, racially charged calls, I’ve gotten so many by concerned citizens who genuinely want to help someone who is hurt or in danger. Good typically wins over evil. But it’s awfully damn close sometimes”
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6 weeks ago
Trying to Put a Value on the Doctor-Patient Relationship | Kim Tingley | NYT | 16 May 2018
In its push for profits, the U.S. health care system has made it difficult for patients to get personal attention from doctors. But what if hands-on medicine actually saves money — and lives?
6 weeks ago
How Tech Can Turn Doctors Into Clerical Workers | Abraham Verghese | NYT | 16 May 2018
The threat the EHR and machine learning pose to physicians' clinical judgement — and their wellbeing.
6 weeks ago
The Birth of the New American Aristocracy | Matthew Stewart | The Atlantic | 19 May 2018
The class divide is already toxic, and is fast becoming unbridgeable. You’re probably part of the problem.
8 weeks ago
Card-Carrying Precadavers | Aaron Kheriaty | First Things | 18 May 2018
A doctor reflects on dissection, transplant surgery, and organ donation. “Putting scalpel to tissue, we began to cut. The knife drew no blood. It is strange, the things you find when you open up dead bodies. One man’s liver was rock-hard, cirrhotic, probably from years of alcohol abuse. We discovered tumors, remnants of old surgeries, food still in the stomach, stool still in the colon, a spleen six times the normal size. Eating lunch was sometimes difficult after anatomy lab”
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8 weeks ago
Die Like A Dog | Joseph Pierre | Aeon | 15 May 2018
Beloved pet dogs can enjoy a peaceful death, forestalling protracted suffering and pain. Why can’t we do the same for humans? “When we were dating in the years before we got married, my wife would often come home from a long day at work and say: ‘I killed my patient today’. This, I came to understand, was a kind of self-reproachful statement of defeat as well as a starkly factual statement that reflected how she’d actually administered the medications that ended a dog or cat’s life”
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8 weeks ago
Last Days Of The Blue-Blood Harvest | Sarah Zhang | The Atlantic | 09 May 2018
“Contemporary humans do not deliberately kill the horseshoe crabs — as did previous centuries of farmers catching them for fertilizer or fishermen using them as bait. Instead, they scrub the crabs clean of barnacles, fold their hinged carapaces, and stick stainless steel needles into a soft, weak spot, in order to draw blood. Horseshoe crab blood runs blue and opaque, like antifreeze mixed with milk”
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8 weeks ago
Jaguars In The Age Of Humans | Nadia Drake | The Atlantic | 04 May 2018
Diary of a journey into the Peruvian jungle on the trail of jaguars. “Powerful predators that kill by puncturing skulls with their tremendous bite, jaguars reign over both ecosystems and mythologies. Everyone hopes to see one of the spotted cats when they visit this part of Peru, and on several earlier occasions, I’d been lucky enough to glimpse the cats along the riverbank. But this was the first time I’d been jaguar’d out of the damn bathroom”
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9 weeks ago
A Major Medical Crisis: Doctor Burnout | Rena Xu | The Atlantic | 11 May 2018
Are electronic medical records and demanding regulations contributing to a historic doctor shortage?
9 weeks ago
Human Husbandry | Elaine Ou | Elaine's Idle Mind | 02 May 2018
“Raising children carries a huge opportunity cost – remove this cost and the population has way more productive capacity. San Francisco, home of the most advanced civilization in the world, also has the lowest share of children out of any major city in the country. Just as a broody hen negatively impacts a farmer’s productivity, a gravid human poses a significant inconvenience to her employer. That’s why companies like Google, Facebook, and Apple pay for female employees to extract and freeze their eggs”
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10 weeks ago
Eating Right: The Follow-Ups | David Katz & Mark Bittman | Grub Street | 01 May 2018
Mark Bittman and David Katz continue their conversation about diet. Breakfast is no big deal. “The importance of eating the minute your feet hit the ground in the morning is folklore. Studies on the timing of breakfast are few, and show mixed results. What it all seems to come down to is hunger. If If you don’t eat breakfast until 10am or 11am or even noon because you aren’t hungry until then, there’s no consistent evidence of any kind of harm”
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10 weeks ago
The Rise Of The Pointless Job | David Graeber | The Guardian | 04 May 2018
“Everyone is familiar with the sort of jobs that don’t seem, to the outsider, really to do much of anything: HR consultants, communications coordinators, PR researchers, financial strategists, corporate lawyers, the people who spend their time staffing committees that discuss the problem of unnecessary committees. What if these jobs really are useless, and those who hold them are actually aware of it?. There are plenty of surveys about whether people are happy at work, but what about whether people feel their jobs have any good reason to exist?”
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10 weeks ago
Where Have All The Pilots Gone? | Jon Evans | TechCrunch | 22 April 2018
What it’s like learning to fly a light plane. “Aviate, Navigate, Communicate, they say — but at first aviation alone seems to take more attention and brainpower than you can allocate. You have rudders, ailerons, elevators, trim, and throttle to control. Sometimes you need to tweak the propellor, the mixture, and the active fuel tank. All this while constantly watching your airspeed, altitude, heading, and vertical speed; maintaining awareness of your engine indicators; and keeping an eye out for other airborne traffic”
from instapaper
12 weeks ago
The Secret Life of the City Banana Annie Correal | NYT | 04 August 2017
Millions of bananas arrive every week in New York City.
It takes a lot to get them from the boat to the bodega
12 weeks ago
Tennis And Technology | Jonah Lehrer | Jonah Lehrer | 18 April 2018
Howard Head patented a carbon-fibre tennis racket in 1974. His bigger, lighter, more powerful rackets took over pro tennis within a decade. They turned it into a younger person’s game. “Players had to learn a new set of tactics and techniques. The increased experience of veterans seemed to interfere with this adjustment. Their exit rate from the tour doubled between 1970 and 1984. Head invented the composite racket to make it easier for older players. He ended up ridding the pro tour of nearly everyone over 30”
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12 weeks ago
What Cape Town Learned From Its Drought | Piotr Wolski | Bulletin Of The Atomic Scientists | 16 April 2018
Total shut-down of mains water in Cape Town has been narrowly averted thanks to official and voluntary restrictions on water use, and some rainfall. The crisis could return within months if rainfall is not sustained. But Cape Town has learned valuable lessons from the drought — lessons which may soon be useful to many other cities around the world. Under pressure, Cape Town residents halved their average water use in the space of six months. They now consume one-sixth the water used by average Americans
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12 weeks ago
The Hidden Victims of American Gun Violence | David S. Bernstein | The Atlantic | 14 December 2017
Because there's very little known about the thousands of victims who survive deadly shootings.
april 2018
The Plunging Morale of America’s Service Members | Phil Klay | The Atlantic | 10 April 2018
After nearly 17 years of war, service members have seen plenty of patriotic displays but little public debate about why they’re fighting.
april 2018
Of Mice and Men | Ri Scarborough | The Conversation | 29 August 2017
Why animal trial results don’t always translate to humans. "A 2006 review looked at studies where medical interventions were tested on animals and whether the results were replicated in human trials. It showed that of the most-cited animal studies in prestigious scientific journals, such as Nature and Cell, only 37% were replicated in subsequent human randomised trials and 18% were contradicted in human trials."
april 2018
The Boy Who Lived on Edges | Christopher Solomon | Outside | 22 March 2018
When extreme skier Adam Roberts was killed by an avalanche in the mountains of Washington State, some people wondered if he’d died on purpose.
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april 2018
The Secret Language Of Ships | Erin Van Rheenen | Hakai | 10 April 2018
How to decode a Plimsoll Line, and other markings on the hulls of big ships. The original 19C Plimsoll Line was a circle with a horizontal line through it. If the line sank below sea-level, the ship was overloaded. The marks and letters to the right of the circle indicate maximum loads under different climatic conditions: W marks the maximum load in winter temperate seawater, S in summer temperate seawater, T in tropical seawater, F in fresh water, and TF in tropical fresh water, like that of the Amazon River
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april 2018
Like A Dog | Jacob Bacharach | New Inquiry | 09 April 2018
“What is it, a dog’s life? We tend to think of our relationships with them in parental terms, but they are closer to siblings, younger brothers and sisters caught up in an unshakeable infancy, idolatrous of us, overeager, annoying and solicitous. We think of them as stupidly happy, but J.R. Ackerley is closer to the truth: The profundity of their love for us makes them helplessly sorrowful, which is why even in her moments of the utmost, unmediated joy, a dog’s eyes remain achingly sad”
from instapaper
april 2018
What If The Hoaxers Are Right? | William Vollmann | Literary Hub | 11 April 2018
An attempt to explain climate-change denial among Americans. The science is complicated, the anecdotal evidence is confusing, and political leaders — who are supposed to set an example — disagree. “I who send this letter to the future hereby plead that we were no more evil or even selfish than anyone else. Our various educational systems failed to impart the minimum knowledge which a citizen would have needed to judge coal, nuclear power and other methods of keeping on the lights”
from instapaper
april 2018
Fight Terror The Somaliland Way | Bruno Maçães | Politico | 11 April 2018
In Somalia the terror group al-Shabbab wreaks violence and anarchy. But neighbouring Somaliland, which broke away from Somalia thirty years ago, is a haven of peace and commerce. “In Somaliland, al-Shabab has no presence — even though part of its leadership originally came from Hargeisa. So how has this small, impoverished, internationally unrecognized state on the Gulf of Aden succeeded where everyone else has failed? What does it know that everyone else is unable to understand?”
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april 2018
What Makes A Tree A Tree? | Rachel Ehrenberg | Knowable | 30 March 2018
“If one is pressed to describe what makes a tree a tree, long life is right up there with wood and height. While many plants have a predictably limited life span, trees don’t, and many persist for centuries. In fact, that trait — indefinite growth — could be science’s tidiest demarcation of treeness, even more than woodiness. Yet it’s only helpful to a point. We think we know what trees are, but they slip through the fingers when we try to define them”
from instapaper
april 2018
The Class Politics Of Teeth | Mary Otto | Dissent | 05 April 2018
“Our heads may be attached to our bodies, but generations of dental and medical providers have been educated separately. They work in different worlds. And many patients get lost in between. The fact that more than a million Americans a year turn to hospital emergency rooms for non-traumatic dental problems such as toothaches is a grim reminder of the disconnect between the dental and medical care systems. These visits cost roughly $1 billion a year, but the patients seldom get the services they need”
from instapaper
april 2018
God Save Austin | Lawrence Wright | Austin Monthly | 02 April 2018
“The Colorado serves the same purpose as the Seine in Paris, a cultural divide. On the north bank are downtown, the state capitol, and the University of Texas — anchors of a city historically made up of teachers and bureaucrats. We bought a duplex on the south side, in a neighborhood called Travis Heights. Our next-door neighbor sold appliances, and next to him was Terrence Malick, the filmmaker, who occasionally walked our kids to school”
from instapaper
april 2018
Eating Right | David Katz & Mark Bittman | Grub Street | 18 March 2018
Straight answers just about every question worth asking about food. Is paleo good? Yes, if you do it right. “Our ancestors consumed a wide variety of ever-changing plant foods that gave them up to 100 grams of fiber daily. They ate lots of insects, too. And, of course, they ate the meat of only wild animals, since there were no domesticated animals in the Stone Age, with the possible exception of the wolf-to-dog transition”
from instapaper
april 2018
15 Years Since the Iraq Invasion | Andrew Exum | The Atlantic | 20 March 2018
Fifteen years after the U.S. invasion, there’s no satisfying answer to the question: What were we doing in Iraq anyway?
march 2018
The Big Love | Florence Aadland | Berfrois | 27 March 2018
Errol Flynn, seen through the eyes of the naive or calculating mother of a fifteen-year-old with whom Flynn was having an affair. “He put me at ease almost at once. I think he really enjoyed meeting me. I wore my gray nylon dress, nylon stockings, black pumps with medium heels and my harlequin-style glasses. I was forty-three years old then, and I know he noticed the similarities between Beverly and me. I’m smaller than she, five feet two, but my hair, which I wear upswept, is blonde and my complexion is fair, like hers”
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march 2018
The Legacy Of The Iraq War | Matt Taibbi | Rolling Stone | 21 March 2018
“This is the legacy of the Iraq war. It began with a crude congressional dog-and-pony show giving Bush approval for the invasion, and was followed by an equally thin presentation to the UN by Colin Powell. A decade and a half later, authorities no longer need to ask anyone permission to do anything. They’ve created in the interim an entirely separate, secret set of rules giving them the right to kill, imprison, torture, or spy on anyone; a permanent war bureaucracy, invisible beyond the executive branch”
from instapaper
march 2018
Does Anyone Have A Right To Sex? | Amia Srinivasan | LRB | 15 March 2018
The discussion is complicated, and perhaps tries to address too many intersectional edge-cases at once. But perplexing and difficult aspects of human desire are addressed with a disarming frankness throughout. If we can envisage a human right to housing, or work, or education, or the pursuit of happiness, then why not also to sex, which is no less fundamental to a flourishing life?
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march 2018
Refugee Detectives | Graeme Wood | The Atlantic | 16 March 2018
How investigators separate opportunists from bona fide refugees among Germany’s million recent immigrants from the Middle East and Africa. “In 2016, we started to see a wave of unaccompanied minors. It was because every clan chief in Afghanistan decided to send his son to Germany at once, as an anchor child”. “Having a fake Eritrean passport is a sign that you might really be from that country”
from instapaper
march 2018
America's Gun-Culture Problem | Andrew Exum | The Atlantic | 05 March 2018
Since the September 11 attacks, attitudes around weaponry have transformed into something unhealthy.
march 2018
In Britain’s Playgrounds, ‘Bringing in Risk’ to Build Resilience | Ellen Barrymarch | NYT | 10 March 2018
Britain is one of a number of countries where educators say a litigious, protective culture has gone too far, leaching healthy risks out of childhood.

Australia last fall introduced new standards for playground equipment, instructing operators to consider the benefits, not just the risks, of activities that could result in injuries. Cities and school districts in Canada and Sweden are following suit.
march 2018
Landing A Plane In A Crazy Crosswind | Alex Davies | Wired | 03 March 2018
“When you crab, as you approach, you point the nose of the plane to the left or the right, angling into the wind. The plane is flying sideways, in a sense—the way a crab walks—but doing so keeps it on course. As you shed altitude and speed, you’ll turn further into the wind, using a mix of experience and trial and error to find the right angle. When you’re just 50 or 100 feet above the ground, about to lift the nose and put rubber to runway, you switch techniques, from the crab to the slip”
from instapaper
march 2018
Skin In The Game | Nassim Nicholas Taleb | Incerto | 05 March 2018
When selecting a surgeon for your next brain procedure, should you pick a surgeon who looks like a butcher, or a surgeon who looks like a surgeon? Answer: Pick the butcher-lookalike. He is so at ease with his skills that he doesn’t feel the need to win your confidence by dressing for the part. “The same logic answers many vital questions, such as the difference between rationality and rationalization, the nature of honour and sacrifice, and from whom to buy your next car”
from instapaper
march 2018
What I Saw Treating Parkland Victims | Heather Sher | The Atlantic | 22 February 2018
“With an AR-15, the shooter does not have to be particularly accurate. If a victim takes a direct hit to the liver from an AR-15, the damage is far graver than that of a simple handgun-shot injury. Handgun injuries to the liver are generally survivable. An AR-15 bullet wound to the middle of the liver would cause so much bleeding that the patient would likely never make it to the trauma center to receive our care”
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march 2018
Dubai’s Ultimate Folly | Oliver Wainwright | The Guardian | 13 February 2018
Revisiting The World, an artificial archipelago of 300 islands off the coast of Dubai planned as “an exclusive offshore playground for film stars, royalty and celebrity tycoons”. Then came the 2008 crash. “Surveying the barren spots of sand that dot the sea today it’s hard to shake the sense of an Ozymandian ruin. Seven times the size of Venice, the remains of The World lie as a mind-boggling monument to the spectacular hubris of a moment in time when anything seemed possible”
from instapaper
february 2018
The Last Drop Of Water In Broken Hill | Michael Green | Nautilus | 08 February 2018
Report from the outback of New South Wales in southeastern Australia, where “Mad Max: Road Warrior” was filmed. And where, now, a real-life apocalypse beckons. Broken Hill is running out of water. “We’re rattling along the gray clay bottom of Lake Menindee, several miles from its shore. Three years ago the lake was full. Together with surrounding lakes, it held five times the water in Sydney Harbor. Rainfall in the past three years is tracking lower than the worst on record. The lakebed is now bone dry”
from instapaper
february 2018
I Like Guns | Anastasia Bernoulli | Engineering And Parenthood | 15 February 2018
“We manage cars, we manage drugs, alcohol, exotic animals and fireworks. We have a whole system of permitting for just about any activity a person wants to conduct since those activities could affect others, and we realize, as a society, that we need to try to minimize the risk to other people that comes from the chosen activities of those around them in which they have no say. Gun ownership is the one thing our country collectively refuses to manage, and the result is a lot of dead people”
from instapaper
february 2018
What Does It Mean to Die? | Rachel Aviv | New Yorker | 29 January 2018
When Jahi McMath was declared brain-dead by the hospital, her family disagreed. Her case challenges the very nature of existence.
february 2018
Doctor—your septic patients have scurvy! | Paul Marik | Critical Care | 29 January 2018
"About 40% of the patients in their ICU with septic shock have serum levels of vitamin C supporting a diagnosis of scurvy (<11.3 u/mol/l). The remainder of their patients with sepsis are likely to have hypovitaminosis C (serum level < 23 u/mol/l). Half of their nonseptic ICU patients also have hypovitaminosis C."
medicine 
february 2018
Promethean Planetary Care | Nick Taylor | PERC | 06 February 2018
Eye-opening discussion of geoengineering, informed by Oliver Morton’s book, ‘The Planet Remade’. “If you haven’t yet read much about geoengineering, it may come as a surprise that governments across the world already presume it will be happening at great scale in the future. Almost all of the scenarios which inform existing international agreements on climate change assume that not-yet-existing technologies will work to suck carbon out of the atmosphere”
from instapaper
february 2018
Twelve Rules For Life | Megan McArdle | Bloomberg | 30 January 2018
Lessons learned, on turning 45. “Politics is not the most important thing in the world. It’s just the one people talk about the most. Your spouse and others around you matter more to your happiness than the government does. You will notice, as you go about your day, that many, many important things are riding on your spouse, things that will have immediate costs and benefits to you. Very few of the things that irritate you or bring you joy have anything to do with the government”
from instapaper
february 2018
The Rules Of Being Rich | Arwa Mahdawi | The Guardian | 01 February 2018
Interviews with upwardly-mobile Americans about adjusting to wealth. “It wasn’t until he made partner in 2016 that Faridi lost his sense of embarrassment. But there’s still a gulf between his new life and his old. His best friends from high school work as cab drivers and busboys or in Pathmark, a major supermarket chain, and he doesn’t get invited to poker nights at their houses. None of them came to my wedding, Faridi says sadly”
from instapaper
february 2018
The Milkmaid Who Supposedly Inspired The Smallpox Vaccine Was A Myth | Susan Brink | Goats and Soda | 01 February 2018
At the meeting, Fewster presented his story of the farmers who never had smallpox but did have cowpox. Boylston believes that the brothers went home and told their young apprentice of Fewster's observations. Jenner was only 13 when he almost certainly heard of Fewster's observation.
february 2018
What Happens When Primary Health Care Is Universal? | Asaf Bitton & Madeline Pesec | Project Syndicate | 18 January 2018
Since the 1990s, one of Latin America’s smallest countries has built a system of primary health care that reaches nearly every citizen. Four key reforms underpinned this progress, and offer a model that other countries pursuing universal health coverage should consider.
february 2018
Pushing the Limits of Extreme Breath-Holding | Alex Hutchinson | New Yorker | 30 January 2018
Short article on apnea challenges and free diving that nicely covers respiratory physiology.
february 2018
Myth-busting: Lactated Ringers is safe in hyperkalemia, and is superior to NS | Josh Farkas | PulmCrit | 29 September 2014
The myth that LR should be avoided in hyperkalemia is not only incorrect, it is probably backwards. For a hyperkalemic patient in renal failure, LR should be preferred over NS. LR has been proven to produce lower potassium levels en vivo.
medicine 
february 2018
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