petej + interdependence   5

Frank Chimero × Blog × The Inferno of Independence
"A mythology of speed is one of willful ignorance to the small details that hold the whole arrangement together. And, I think, if you’re building things for the internet, those small details matter, because they are repeated ten-fold, hundred-fold, million-fold, as they are replicated effortlessly through screens, across the globe, and into people’s consciousness for countless hours of exposure. Economies of scale make small decisions matter, but speed— both in making those small decisions and in interacting them—makes both sides blind to what’s going on. We’re thoughtlessly writing things we can’t read, because we’re going too fast."

"Revolutionary, disruptive, magical, wizards, and on and on—contemporary digital culture has co-opted the language of revolution and magic without the muscle, ethics, conviction, or imagination of either. And it’s not that those things aren’t possible, we just aren’t living up to their meaning and instead saturating ourselves with hyperbole. These are words you have to earn, and slinging them around strips the words of their powerful meaning. Can you take a real revolution seriously if you are bombarded with messaging that your phone is revolutionary?"

"And I like you. I want you here, making your things. But if I had to choose, I would choose you over your work. Jane Doe the Person is more important than Jane Doe’s Work. That may be a huge loss for culture if Jane has particularly acute creative powers, but at least she didn’t get harrowed out because we built an imbalanced system based on short-term, unreasonable expectations.

Listen: we only deserve what we can maintain and keep safe. A community is only as good as how well it takes care of all its members. There is no independence. There is only subservience or co-dependence. And I choose you. I choose community."
culture  community  creativity  independence  interdependence  technology  SiliconValley  makers 
september 2013 by petej

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