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Hard, soft or no Brexit, Britain must begin to heal its wounds | Martin Kettle | Opinion | The Guardian
Those who believe that the importance of our place in the EU makes a second referendum vital cannot avoid asking themselves whether the wider outcome and consequences are worth the risk. On balance, in my view, they are. But I cannot help worrying at the same time that a Britain in which the liberal left feels outraged about Brexit may be literally a less dangerous place for us all to live in while we try to rebuild our relationship with each other and with Europe, than a Britain in which it is the nationalist right who feel betrayed.
UK  EU  Brexit  MayTheresa  politics  polarisation  ClarkeKenneth  liberalism  nationalism  danger  referendum  dctagged  dc:creator=KettleMartin 
1 hour ago
Poverty exists. Shooting the UN messenger won’t erase that fact | Nesrine Malik | Opinion | The Guardian
Predictably and punctually, the denials of Alston’s findings arrived. He was told by the UK government that the social support system was ticking along nicely, and that there was no extreme poverty in the UK because, among other cherry-picked statistics, household incomes were at a record high. This encapsulates the government’s broken logic – to which it holds doggedly despite all contrary evidence – that because some people are becoming better off, then all of us are. If anything, this excuse reifies allegations of a two-tier society, where one half is getting richer while the other is getting poorer, and high walls are erected against the desperate and eyes averted from their suffering.

The UK is in a spiral where an irreversible, indisputable calamity has to happen – a Windrush or a Grenfell – before any tragically belated reforms are introduced. Shooting the UN messenger may afford this government temporary relief, but it comes at the expense of the country’s future.
UN  AlstonPhilip  UK  austerity  poverty  humanRights  vulnerability  inequality 
2 days ago
Brexit is a class betrayal. So why is Labour colluding in it? | John Harris | Opinion | The Guardian
These things are part of a vast charge sheet not only against the modern Conservative party, but an alliance of old and new money that has set the basic terms of British politics for the past 40 years. Jacob Rees-Mogg and Boris Johnson were educated at the same exclusive school as the prime minister whose idiotic decision to hold a referendum gave them their opportunity. Nigel Farage and Arron Banks are archetypal examples of the kind of spivs who were given licence to do as they pleased in the 80s. For all their absurd bleating about “elites”, we all know what these people represent: the two faces of the modern English ruling class, who have long combined to be nothing but trouble.
UK  Brexit  Leave  ToryParty  deindustrialisation  austerity  referendum  misinformation  dishonesty  Thatcherism  opposition  LabourParty  withdrawalAgreement  noDeal  PeoplesVote  class  dctagged  dc:creator=HarrisJohn 
2 days ago
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