paulbradshaw + comments   257

How The Times of London increased digital subscribers 19% in a year - Digiday
A key retention lever for The Times is commenting, particularly having journalists interact with readers. But this takes resource. Thanks to the content review, the five-person comment curation team can more easily prioritize which types of articles they should focus on to generate more discussions in the comments. Often these are exclusive pieces, case studies, columns and opinion pieces. The comment curation team keep the discussions alive, alert journalists when their articles have people talking and use polls to encourage the shier readers to interact. The number of average comments depends on the type of piece, Evans said.
Analytics  comments  times  cm 
2 days ago by paulbradshaw
Moderating Uncivil Comments Hurts Trust In News - Center for Media Engagement
Moderators who focused exclusively on uncivil content:
Perceived the news outlet they were working for as less trustworthy,2
Were more emotionally exhausted,3
Were less satisfied with the task of moderation,4
Had a less immersive work experience.5 An immersive work experience is called a sense of “flow” in a task that makes it feel less effortful.6
Solutions for Newsrooms
comments  trauma  Research  trust  mentalhealth  moderation 
4 weeks ago by paulbradshaw
Media companies liable for Facebook comments made by others, court finds
Mr Voller said the comments, on 10 Facebook posts published in 2016 and 2017, carried a series of false and defamatory imputations including that he attacked a Salvation Army officer who visited him in detention and left the man blind in one eye.

He did not ask for the comments to be taken down by the media outlets but launched defamation proceedings against them in the Supreme Court, arguing that they had "published" the comments of third parties.
law  Defamation  libel  Australia  comments  fb 
7 weeks ago by paulbradshaw
'Growing the number isn’t always the key': How publishers approach comment strategies - Digiday
Commenting, as well as time on page and shares, is one of the many core metrics News UK’s The Times of London has studied over the last three months to gauge the interests of digital readers. These findings have shaped what the publisher commissions. For instance, the highest performing articles, in terms of core metrics like time on page and comments, in the world-news section are from experts on the ground; these are in-depth analysis pieces rather than news reporting. As a result, the London world-news desk is covering more articles that focus on foreign-news reporting freeing up more time for foreign correspondents to cover more analysis pieces.

Nordic media company Schibsted highlights the articles with the highest number of comments on its homepages. These stories have an average 8% higher click-through rate compared to others. Now, the publisher is researching which topics spark debate and the demographics of those that interact: As with many newspaper publishers, attracting a younger more equal gender split of readers is a key concern.
comments  engagement  metrics 
11 weeks ago by paulbradshaw
Goodbye “moderators,” hello “audience voice reporters”: Here’s how The Wall Street Journal is refocusing the comments to incentivize better behavior » Nieman Journalism Lab
Conversations will begin with question prompts from our reporters, who will occasionally engage directly.

Participation in these conversations will be an exclusive benefit for Wall Street Journal members.

We’ve relabeled “comments” as “conversations” to help create an environment where everyone is welcome and encouraged to share their thoughts.
comments  moderation  wsj  t  engagement 
april 2019 by paulbradshaw
Audiences Portal - Research - How to make compelling current affairs for Instagram
Although it occupies a relatively small part of users' feeds, current affairs-style content on Instagram fulfils their desire to be well-rounded people and is seen as an accessible way to stay informed about important issues. This kind of content is considered a welcome dose of reality that allows users to appreciate what they have, and its stands out in a feed of highly filtered content that can sometimes leave them aspiring to have a "better" life.

Audiences also value content when it gives a different perspective on stories (not) covered in the news. A personal storytelling approach is seen to humanise issues that are often hard to relate to, and give a voice to people who are often not heard elsewhere. Stories from a human perspective are also considered by some to be less filtered than traditional news articles and so are felt to be less "biased".
Instagram  bbc  consumption  Comments 
february 2019 by paulbradshaw
Content or Context Moderation? | Data & Society
 Robyn Caplan draws from interviews with representatives at 10 major digital platforms to identify three content moderation strategies: artisanal, community-reliant, and industrial.
comments  ugc  moderation  research  t 
november 2018 by paulbradshaw
If you let commenters go after your reporters, it hurts your credibility with other readers » Nieman Journalism Lab
We found a significant effect for the abusive comment on author credibility and intention to seek news from the author and outlet in the future, but gender of the author did not moderate these effects. To ensure the null effects for gender were not an artifact of comment or topic, we fielded two additional survey experiments. Across topics, whether the abuse was gendered or gender-specific, we found abusive comments exert significant negative effects on evaluations, regardless of author gender. Our results have implications for news organizations considering comments.
comments  research  gender 
november 2018 by paulbradshaw
The People Have Spoken (The Bastards?): Finding a legitimate place for feedback in the journalistic field: Journalism Practice: Vol 12, No 9
Bourdieu’s field theory presents a distinction between the autonomy of a field and the heteronomity of the fields that surround and potentially encroach on it. Journalism is one such field which attempts to maintain its autonomy in the face of change imposed from beyond its boundaries. This paper looks at how the field of journalism responds to two incursions in the form of feedback: quantitative Web analytics and qualitative reader comments. Each offers an opportunity for the field to adapt to incorporate it—that is, turn heteronomous input into autonomous doxa—or to resist it. Based on an ethnography of eight digital newsrooms, it looks at when the voice of the people is accepted as legitimate input and internalised, and when it is resisted as illegitimate and kept external. The implications for further theorising on the relationship between adjacent fields, as well as autonomous and heteronomous aspects of field theory, are discussed.
Research  Comments  ugc 
october 2018 by paulbradshaw
When the Gated Misbehave: Online reader comments on Anthony Weiner’s sexting scandal: Journalism Practice: Vol 12, No 9
This study analyzes online reader comments on top US newspapers’ stories related to former congressman, Anthony Weiner’s, August 2016 sexting scandal. Audience gatekeeping was seen through such discussion themes as gender bias and sexism, political scandals, and sex addiction. The analysis revealed that the majority of reader comments significantly diverged from the news topic, and many comments about US politicians were uncivil. Furthermore, online discussions “drowned out” newspapers’ intended message about Weiner’s inclusion of his toddler son into a sexually explicit selfie. This study argues that online commentary should not be perceived as a dichotomy—a negative or positive development, a contributor or preventer of public discourse—but rather as a continuum of citizen engagement.
Research  Comments 
october 2018 by paulbradshaw
Effects of Civility and Reasoning in User Comments on Perceived Journalistic Quality: Journalism Studies: Vol 19, No 1
Journalists are increasingly concerned that offensive and banal user comments on news websites might alienate readers and damage quality perceptions. To explore such presumed effects, we investigated the impact of civility and reasoning (and lack thereof) in user comments on perceptions of journalistic quality. An experiment revealed that unreasoned comments decrease an article’s perceived informational quality, but only in unknown news brands. Incivility in comments had an unconditionally negative effect on the perceived formal quality of an article. Neither civility nor reasoning improved the assessments of journalistic quality, as compared to a comment-free version. On the contrary, we observed a trend showing that the mere presence of comments deteriorates the perceived quality of an article.
Research  comments 
july 2018 by paulbradshaw
To Post or not to Post?: Anonymous user comments in the Israeli journalistic sphere: Journalism Studies: Vol 19, No 10
User comments have become an integral part of news websites. This study implements the well-validated theory of planned behavior (TPB) in order to understand the individual decision to post anonymous comments on news sites in Israel. We examine whether commenting is a spontaneous behavior, as has been argued in previous studies, or a reasoned behavior. Based on an internet survey (N = 707), the present study results support the hypothesis that the process involved in posting a comment in a specific socio-political context involves a reasoned action that can be understood by applying a generic theoretical model. Empirical support for TPB model hypotheses for intention prediction was evident, with the subjective norm-intention relation stronger than the attitude and perceived behavioral control–intention relations. In spite of the anonymous nature of the comments, findings highlight the relevance of the perceived socio-political context for individuals’ decision whether to post an anonymous comment.
Research  Comments  anonymity 
july 2018 by paulbradshaw
A new hope: AI for news media | TechCrunch
machine learning can be utilized to create new forms of interaction between people, journalists and the newsroom. Automatically moderated commenting is just one example already in use today. Think if it would be possible to build interactions directly on the lock screen that let the journalists better understand the way content is consumed, simultaneously capturing in real time the emotions conveyed by the story.
ai  ml  t  personalisation  comments 
july 2018 by paulbradshaw
New website for Newsround
The first thing the Newsround audience will notice is the range of participatory experiences that will be available. We want Newsround to be the place where children can find out, join in and be heard, and with new comments features, quizzes and the ability to rank lists, children will be able to shape news content in a way that hasn't been possible before.   

This is the first step the audience will notice in a programme of transformation that will continue as we deliver on Newsround's part of Children's Kids 2020 strategy. Later this year we will be releasing new mobile friendly formats and developing ways of explaining the news through online games. 
websiterelaunch  bbc  newsround  comments  interactivity  children  youth 
july 2018 by paulbradshaw
Assessing “The Regulars”—and Beyond: A study of comments on Norwegian and Swedish newspaper Facebook pages: Journalism Practice: Vol 12, No 5
Commenting on online news articles must be considered an online staple—an established practice among news consumers that is currently being funnelled from the Web pages of news organizations to third-party platforms such as Facebook. The paper at hand adopts an exploratory approach and provides insights into the fervency and popularity of commentators and comments on the Facebook pages of two Swedish and two Norwegian newspapers. The results indicate that while immigration issues are a common topic in both countries, the Swedish context stands out by also featuring high degrees of commenting activity in relation to issues of gender equality. Identifying a series of differences in how these opportunities to comment on news are used in each country, the Swedish context appears to offer a wider range of opinions among the most fervent commentators in comparison with Norway. A similar tendency is found among the most “liked” comments.
Comments  Research  norway  sweden 
june 2018 by paulbradshaw
Is audience engagement a mushy construct based on anecdata — or something audiences actually want? » Nieman Journalism Lab
As things stand now, Nelson writes, there’s no standard definition of audience engagement. Does it mean “audience attentiveness,” or journalism that is “more interactive or participatory,” or journalism that “encourages audiences to participate in civic life”? Does it build loyalty? Does it change audience preferences? (“Although many in journalism assume that audiences are inherently uninterested in public affairs news, some audience engagement advocate think that audiences would eagerly tune into these stories if they felt more included in the reporting process.”)

Hearken’s method has been to invite readers into the reporting process by inviting them to submit questions that they think should be investigated and then, down the line, possibly even including them in the investigation process. An annual Hearken subscription fee is around $8,500. Nelson spent three days a week in Hearken’s offices for three months, read internal memos, monitored its Slack channel, sat in on Hearken’s pitches to newsrooms, and interviewed several employees multiple times.

Here are some of his observations from the full paper:
engagement  Research  hearken  comments 
june 2018 by paulbradshaw
Tools, tech, and the newsroom: How the Washington Post does it
The tool also uses AI-assisted moderation to identify problems quickly and to carry out bulk actions. Barber said that they’re still evaluating its wider impact, but they’ve already seen increases in some key metrics, such as the time commenters spend on site. More than half of The Post’s commenters are subscribers, so improvements to comments are a boost for their most loyal users.
ai  comments  washpo 
june 2018 by paulbradshaw
Constructive Comments?: Designing an online debate system for the Danish Broadcasting Corporation: Journalism Practice: Vol 0, No 0
This article brings together two strands of research that have the potential to inform the development of constructive forms of journalism: online comments and media design. Through a three-year-long case study of the development of new formats for online comments on the website of the Danish Broadcasting Corporation, I explore the challenges encountered from two perspectives: the design features of the commenting system and the design process. While the broadcaster has emphasized developing features for strengthening editorial control, user engagement has faltered. A lack of attention to users in the design process seems to have contributed to the problems. These findings have implications for constructive journalism’s ambitions to facilitate audience engagement, in particular when tied to online platforms.
Research  comments  denmark  solj 
may 2018 by paulbradshaw
Commenting on the News: Explaining the degree and quality of user comments on news websites: Journalism Studies: Vol 19, No 5
Journalists and digital news audiences value virtual conversations about the news, but only if they embody civil discussion. Drawing on a content analysis of 1379 stories and 333,605 user comments across 20 news websites, this study focuses on predictors of the volume of comments (as an indicator of user engagement and interactivity with the news) and the relative quality of those discussions, in terms of civility/hostility. The analysis explores variations in the degree and quality of user comments across story content (topic; including outside sources), story format (multimedia features), journalist participation in commenting platforms, and organizational commenting policies. The results shed light on how journalists and news organizations might encourage more and higher-quality user engagement with the news.
Research  comments 
march 2018 by paulbradshaw
Buzzfeed's new 'Outside Your Bubble' is a disaster in the making
My major problem is that this assumption is incorrect. People are aware of the opinions of others. Between the news and social media, the only way to not hear from other people on the internet is to not be on the internet.

In my experience, people understand that other opinions exist, and what the opinions are. What people don’t understand is where the opinions come from, and they don’t care to find out for themselves. That’s where BuzzFeed’s module falls short at best, and contributes to the problem at worst.
buzzfeed  Comments  ugc  cm  filterbubbles  homophily 
september 2017 by paulbradshaw
When the Gated Misbehave: Online reader comments on Anthony Weiner’s sexting scandal: Journalism Practice: Vol 0, No 0
This study analyzes online reader comments on top US newspapers’ stories related to former congressman, Anthony Weiner’s, August 2016 sexting scandal. Audience gatekeeping was seen through such discussion themes as gender bias and sexism, political scandals, and sex addiction. The analysis revealed that the majority of reader comments significantly diverged from the news topic, and many comments about US politicians were uncivil. Furthermore, online discussions “drowned out” newspapers’ intended message about Weiner’s inclusion of his toddler son into a sexually explicit selfie. This study argues that online commentary should not be perceived as a dichotomy—a negative or positive development, a contributor or preventer of public discourse—but rather as a continuum of citizen engagement.
Research  comments 
september 2017 by paulbradshaw
Russian paid trolls: Half of comments below the Guardian’s stories on Ukraine came from just 10…
A quarter of the comments below the Guardian stories came from 15 accounts

I analysed the discussions below 10 Guardian articles published in May with the tag Ukraine. Over 90% of users had their say up to 10 times but they left behind only 52% of comments. In total, 1,292 unique users posted 9,220 times.
trolls  text  dj  krystinashveda  comments 
september 2017 by paulbradshaw
Exploring the Role of Algorithms in Online Harmful Speech - Shorenstein Center
Other conversations more broadly explored the role of machine learning, algorithms, and artificial intelligence in both producing and addressing harmful speech online. For example, Camille François, a principal researcher at Jigsaw — a think tank and technology incubator within Google — discussed her group’s recent partnership with the New York Times to develop a machine learning tool to help the Times moderate its comment sections online.

The new tool, called Moderator, can automatically prioritize comments that are likely to be in need of review or removal, easing the job of content moderation. The tool was trained on more than 16 million moderated Times comments, and has allowed the Times to substantially increase the volume of commenting it allows. François emphasized the importance of transparency and collaboration in developing automated tools of this sort, and she also highlighted the value of data and experimentation.
moderation  comments  algorithms  hatespeech  trolls 
september 2017 by paulbradshaw
The Facebook page of German daily Die Welt will talk to you like a friend — with gifs, jokes, and facts » Nieman Journalism Lab
“We’ve put more emphasis on what I’ve been calling counterspeech. If someone comments on our post with numbers, and the numbers they’re quoting are not from a credible source, we will respond. But we’re not just doing it for the person challenging us — you could argue that person is a troll who puts out fake numbers to get us to respond to them,” Salah-Eldin said. “We’re doing it for all the people on our page silently reading, who think, these numbers about refugees seem very high, but maybe it’s true? Then the comment stands there uncountered.” (ProPublica has taken a similar route on Twitter; its audience engagement team regularly tweetstorms facts and context around newsy issues, with the “no-bullshit-and-speaking-bluntly vernacular of social.”)
factchecking  germany  diewelt  fb  Comments  gifs 
august 2017 by paulbradshaw
The Times of London finds commenters are most valuable visitors - Digiday
To start putting a value on those who engage with its platform, The Times of London analyzed comments on its website from May 2016 to April 2017. The News UK title found that those who comment, which amount to about 4 percent of its subscribers, read three times as many articles as those who don’t comment.

For now, only Times subscribers can comment. The Times’ 1.2 million registered users can read comments, but they can’t participate in discussions. In time, the publisher plans to explore using comments to turn registered users into subscribers.

“We’re massively striving to get readers to use their subscription more frequently and drive habitual behavior,” said Ben Whitelaw, head of audience development at the Times and The Sunday Times.
comments  engagement  t  Research 
july 2017 by paulbradshaw
Assessing “The Regulars”—and Beyond: A study of comments on Norwegian and Swedish newspaper Facebook pages: Journalism Practice: Vol 0, No 0
Commenting on online news articles must be considered an online staple—an established practice among news consumers that is currently being funnelled from the Web pages of news organizations to third-party platforms such as Facebook. The paper at hand adopts an exploratory approach and provides insights into the fervency and popularity of commentators and comments on the Facebook pages of two Swedish and two Norwegian newspapers. The results indicate that while immigration issues are a common topic in both countries, the Swedish context stands out by also featuring high degrees of commenting activity in relation to issues of gender equality. Identifying a series of differences in how these opportunities to comment on news are used in each country, the Swedish context appears to offer a wider range of opinions among the most fervent commentators in comparison with Norway. A similar tendency is found among the most “liked” comments.
Comments  fb  Research  norway 
july 2017 by paulbradshaw
Putting comments in code: the good, the bad, and the ugly.
Rather than decorating a slightly confusing statement with a clever rhyme — in amphibrach dimeter, no less — the author would have been far better off spending time on a function that makes the code itself easier to read and understand. Maybe a function named, removeCurlyBraces called from another function named sanitizeInput?
coding  comments 
april 2017 by paulbradshaw
User Experiences with Editorial Control in Online Newspaper Comment Fields: Journalism Practice: Vol 0, No 0
This article investigates user experiences with editorial control in online newspaper comment fields following the public backlash against online comments after the 2011 terror attacks in Norway. We analyze data from a survey of online news consumers focusing on experiences and attitudes towards editorial control set against a spectrum between “interventionist” and “noninterventionist” positions. Results indicate that interventionist respondents rate the quality of online comments as poor, whereas noninterventionist respondents have most often experienced being the target of editorial control measures and feel that editorial control has intensified after the terror attacks. We conclude that newspapers should pay attention to the different needs of participants when devising strategies for editorial control. Media professionals should also consider changes to increase the transparency of moderation practices.
comments  Research 
march 2017 by paulbradshaw
This site is “taking the edge off rant mode” by making readers pass a quiz before commenting » Nieman Journalism Lab
On some stories, potential commenters are now required to answer three basic multiple-choice questions about the article before they’re allowed to post a comment. (For instance, in the digital surveillance story: “What does DGF stand for?”)
t  s  Comments  Norway 
march 2017 by paulbradshaw
This tool from Google parent Alphabet tries to tackle “toxic” comments through machine learning » Nieman Journalism Lab
Perspective reviews comments and scores them based on how similar they are to comments people said were “toxic” or likely to make someone leave a conversation. To learn how to spot potentially toxic language, Perspective examined hundreds of thousands of comments that had been labeled by human reviewers. Each time Perspective finds new examples of potentially toxic comments, or is provided with corrections from users, it can get better at scoring future comments.

Publishers can choose what they want to do with the information they get from Perspective. For example, a publisher could flag comments for its own moderators to review and decide whether to include them in a conversation. Or a publisher could provide tools to help their community understand the impact of what they are writing  —  by, for example, letting the commenter see the potential toxicity of their comment as they write it. Publishers could even just allow readers to sort comments by toxicity themselves, making it easier to find great discussions hidden under toxic ones.
ai  moderation  Comments  t  ugc 
february 2017 by paulbradshaw
Gather will offer a platform to explore questions around community engagement » Nieman Journalism Lab
Gather is a collection of searchable resources. It’s a place to learn (and borrow) from existing projects. It’s a hub for collaboration. It’s an advanced how-to guide for engagement vets and an on-ramp for newbies. It’s a digital meeting space where engaged journalism’s budding community of practice can continue to grow and evolve.
engagement  ugc  s  t  cm  Research  Comments 
february 2017 by paulbradshaw
Helping You See Outside Your Bubble
Outside Your Bubble feature will appear as a module at the bottom of some widely shared news articles and will pull in what people are saying about the piece on Twitter, Facebook, Reddit, the web, and other platforms. It's a response to the reality that often the same story will have two or three distinct and siloed conversations taking place around it on social media, where people talk to the like-minded without even being aware of other perspectives on the same reporting.
filterbubbles  buzzfeed  curation  Comments 
february 2017 by paulbradshaw
Diversifying Likes: Relating reactions to commenting and sharing on newspaper Facebook pages: Journalism Practice: Vol 0, No 0
News sharing and commenting are arguably some of the most interesting aspects of how news is consumed and interacted with online. Finding answers to questions regarding who engages in these ways, what type of content gets engaged with, and why certain items are shared and commented upon but not others, are of the utmost importance for those who want to navigate the complex echo system of online news flows. The paper at hand addresses the latter two of the three posed questions—what gets shared or commented on, and why—in the context of the social networking site Facebook. Detailing the influences of Reactions, an expansion of the “Like” button, launched during the spring of 2016, the presented analysis finds that Reactions such as “Love”, “Haha”, “Wow”, “Sad” and “Angry” emerge as somewhat unpopular compared to the original “Like” functionality. Moreover, while more positive forms of Reactions appear to have a hampering effect on the willingness of news consumers on Facebook to engage by means of sharing and commenting, more negative varieties of Facebook Reactions appear to yield adverse influences.
Research  fb  engagement  comments 
february 2017 by paulbradshaw
Social media 'leaves publishers in the dust, connecting people around stories' | News | FIPP.com
We asked her, Greg Barber, director of Digital News Projects at The Washington Post, who is also The Post’s lead for The Coral Project, and Christa Mrgan, co-founder and VP of design at Civil Co., for their opinions on audience engagement and:

1. Websites “outsourcing” comment sections to social media

2. If and how comment sections and social media should work in tandem  
Comments 
february 2017 by paulbradshaw
To Post or not to Post?: To Post or not to Post?: Journalism Studies: Vol 0, No 0
User comments have become an integral part of news websites. This study implements the well-validated theory of planned behavior (TPB) in order to understand the individual decision to post anonymous comments on news sites in Israel. We examine whether commenting is a spontaneous behavior, as has been argued in previous studies, or a reasoned behavior. Based on an internet survey (N = 707), the present study results support the hypothesis that the process involved in posting a comment in a specific socio-political context involves a reasoned action that can be understood by applying a generic theoretical model. Empirical support for TPB model hypotheses for intention prediction was evident, with the subjective norm-intention relation stronger than the attitude and perceived behavioral control–intention relations. In spite of the anonymous nature of the comments, findings highlight the relevance of the perceived socio-political context for individuals’ decision whether to post an anonymous comment.
anonymity  comments  israel  Research 
february 2017 by paulbradshaw
Commenters say they want journalists and experts to join them in the comments » Nieman Journalism Lab
On average, 81 percent of commenters at the news sites included in the report said they’d like it if reporters clarified factual questions in the comment section; that percentage varied between 71 percent and 87 percent across the sites surveyed.



In addition, an average of 73 percent of respondents said they wanted “experts” on topics covered in a news article to weigh in on comments (percentages varied between 61 percent and 82 percent across the sites surveyed). Nearly half said they’d like it if journalists highlighted quality comments. (The Washington Post will begin doing even more of that on Friday, when it launches an email newsletter highlighting top reader comments and discussion threads.)
comments  t 
january 2017 by paulbradshaw
Participation and Online News - Reuters Institute Digital News Report
As with commenting, users have many different reasons and motivations for sharing the news. On balance, our data suggest that people usually share news stories because they in some way ‘approve’ of the coverage. But, in the five countries where we asked respondents about their reasons for sharing the news, most people said that half the time they share because they approve, and half the time because they disapprove.
comments  Research 
january 2017 by paulbradshaw
DELFI AS v. ESTONIA - 64569/09 - Grand Chamber Judgment [2015] ECHR 586 (16 June 2015)
3.  The applicant company alleged that its freedom of expression had been violated, in breach of Article 10 of the Convention, by the fact that it had been held liable for the third-party comments posted on its Internet news portal.
trolling  law  comments 
january 2017 by paulbradshaw
Vice is fed up of monitoring 'crap' and removes comments section | Media | The Drum
The statement pointed out that while comments can foster a productive community discussion around a particular story or topic, they are rarely at their best and are too often “prone to anarchy”.

“Too often they devolve into racist, misogynistic maelstroms where the loudest, most offensive, and stupidest opinions get pushed to the top and the more reasoned responses drowned out in the noise,” said Vice editor in chief, Jonathan Smith.
comments  vice 
december 2016 by paulbradshaw
NPR Website To Get Rid Of Comments : NPR Ombudsman : NPR
the audience itself has decided for NPR, choosing to engage much more via social media, primarily on Twitter and Facebook, rather than in the NPR.org comments section.

"We've reached the point where we've realized that there are other, better ways to achieve the same kind of community discussion around the issues we raise in our journalism," he said, with money, and spending it efficiently, part of the issue. More than 5 million people each month engage with NPR on Twitter, compared to just a fraction of that number in the NPR.org comments. "In relative terms, as we set priorities, it becomes increasingly clear that the market has spoken. This is where people want to engage with us. So that's what we're going to emphasize," he said.
Comments 
august 2016 by paulbradshaw
Commenting on the News: Commenting on the News: Journalism Studies: Vol 0, No 0
Journalists and digital news audiences value virtual conversations about the news, but only if they embody civil discussion. Drawing on a content analysis of 1379 stories and 333,605 user comments across 20 news websites, this study focuses on predictors of the volume of comments (as an indicator of user engagement and interactivity with the news) and the relative quality of those discussions, in terms of civility/hostility. The analysis explores variations in the degree and quality of user comments across story content (topic; including outside sources), story format (multimedia features), journalist participation in commenting platforms, and organizational commenting policies. The results shed light on how journalists and news organizations might encourage more and higher-quality user engagement with the news.
Comments  Research 
august 2016 by paulbradshaw
Normalizing Online Comments - Journalism Practice -
This study sought to understand the role of online comments—particularly uncivil ones—in journalists’ routines. In-depth interviews with 34 journalists reveal they are becoming more comfortable with online comments and often engage with commenters to foster deliberative discussions or quell incivility. However, our data also suggest some journalists feel discomfort with engaging in this way for fear it breaches the journalistic norm of objectivity. Overall, findings suggest journalists are not ceding their gatekeeping role to the public through comments, but rather re-asserting it through moderating objectionable comments and engaging. In addition, findings suggest journalists are participating in “reciprocal journalism” by fostering mutually beneficial connections with the audience.
comments  Research  gatekeeping 
july 2016 by paulbradshaw
How Gawker is pulling comments into its Facebook Instant Articles - Digiday
So Gawker built a tool that pulls in the top 10 comment threads from its network of sites and displays them at the end of its Facebook Instant Articles. The tool also works on Gawker’s Accelerated Mobile Pages, Google’s new fast-loading article template.
comments  gawker 
july 2016 by paulbradshaw
Participation and Control - Digital Journalism -
This article investigates commentary journalism online, based on a case study of the Norwegian regional newspaper Nordlys and its online commentary and debate section. The aim is to discuss how journalists perceive the loss of control when technologies and users interact with the debate agenda online. Actor-network theory is used to explore the interaction amongst editorial staff, new technologies, professional norms and the participation of audiences. The findings reveal that digital technology becomes a powerful actor in the network of public media, as it directly affects the forms of journalistic presentation and public debates. In addition, new technologies contribute to the empowerment of audiences, who gain better access to both the newsroom and the wider public.
comments  Research  participation  engagement  norway 
june 2016 by paulbradshaw
Examining the benefits of audience integration - Digital Journalism - Volume 4, Issue 5
This study investigates whether sharing of or commenting on online news enhances loyalty toward online news outlets. We identify two mediators of audience integration and loyalty: satisfaction and trust, which are measured by attitudinal attributions toward a news outlet. Loyalty is measured by frequently and exclusively using an online news outlet and an absent willingness to change to another online news outlet in the future. The relations between audience integration, satisfaction, trust, and loyalty are estimated with a mediation model. Results from an online survey with N = 1825 Swiss online news users reveal small but significant effects of sharing and commenting quantities on loyalty. Sharing tends to increase satisfaction, which in turn enhances loyalty. In contrast, commenting deteriorates satisfaction and trust, but directly improves loyalty. Overall, sharing and commenting slightly increase loyalty. In conclusion, sharing has a small, positive attitudinal relationship-building capacity for online news outlets, whereas commenting does not. Nonetheless, commenting features should not be abandoned by news outlets.
comments  Research  engagement  sharing  distribution 
may 2016 by paulbradshaw
Why the Financial Times still believes in comment sections - Digiday
strategy around comments was more about damage control. Last year, Renée Kaplan joined as head of audience engagement and has built up an 11-person team. Now that team is getting more proactive and is using comments as a tool for engagement. “For other media companies, the comment strategy is more about growth,” said Kaplan. “For the FT, we have a unique commitment to make something of these comments, the readers are entitled to being part of the quality conversation and what the community has to offer.”
Comments  ft  engagement 
may 2016 by paulbradshaw
Finishing the “Unfinished” Story - Digital Journalism -
Discussion threads published beneath articles on news websites have only lately become the subject of serious scholarship. While early research preoccupied itself with the hostile nature of comments posted on such forums, and the issue of moderation, recent studies have focused on two interlocking questions: the extent to which professional news organizations, and the journalists they employ, are “buying into” the value of encouraging audience-members to comment on their articles and how successfully (or not) news-makers are using threads to forge virtual “communities”. While the purpose of constructing such communities has largely been viewed through a utilitarian prism—as a means of drawing in traffic, building brand loyalty and generating income—consideration has also been given to threads as vehicles for empowering citizens, by allowing them to debate and/or contest the authority of professionally written news texts and/or establishment narratives. This article aims to go further, by building on an emerging strand of research which conceives of discussion posts less as adjuncts, or mere responses, to journalists’ articles than extensions of them. It argues that the most valuable “evidence-based” posts add background detail, colour and context that can greatly enhance—and help make complete—otherwise “unfinished” stories.
comments  Research 
april 2016 by paulbradshaw
Effects of civility and reasoning in user comments on perceived journalistic quality - Journalism Studies -
Journalists are increasingly concerned that offensive and banal user comments on news websites might alienate readers and damage quality perceptions. To explore such presumed effects, we investigated the impact of civility and reasoning (and lack thereof) in user comments on perceptions of journalistic quality. An experiment revealed that unreasoned comments decrease an article’s perceived informational quality, but only in unknown news brands. Incivility in comments had an unconditionally negative effect on the perceived formal quality of an article. Neither civility nor reasoning improved the assessments of journalistic quality, as compared to a comment-free version. On the contrary, we observed a trend showing that the mere presence of comments deteriorates the perceived quality of an article.
Comments  Research 
march 2016 by paulbradshaw
Disaster for Theresa May as legal ruling brings student deportations to a halt
RT : How can a minister deport thousands of people on made up evidence and not offer their resignation? I merely ask.
comments  from twitter
march 2016 by paulbradshaw
Here are 27 ways to think about comments – Poynter
Diakopoulous recently conducted an experiment examining whether algorithms could be used to help editors highlight high-quality comments on their news sites. The algorithm assigned ratings to comments based on their relevance, readability and conversational tone and compared them to comments evaluated by humans. The comments picked by the computer correlated with what people selected as “good comments.”
comments  research 
march 2016 by paulbradshaw
Telegraph suspends comment on relaunched online content | Media | The Guardian
In October, Reddit announced that its news publishing spin-off, Upvoted, would not permit the rating of content or allow comments.

Last January, Bloomberg removed the option to comment on stories following a relaunch of its flagship website.

Bloomberg did not comment on the decision but it is understood that the decision was taken that conversations about its content were better served on social media rather than its own platform.
comments  telegraph 
march 2016 by paulbradshaw
Does the Structural Pluralism Model Predict Differences in Journalists’ Perceptions of Online Comments? - Digital Journalism - Volume 4, Issue 3
This study explores whether the structural pluralism model predicts how journalists mediate and perceive online comments on news websites. A survey finds that in pluralistic communities, where power is shared among more groups, journalists place fewer restrictions on online comments than in more homogenous communities, where power is concentrated. Journalists at small, independently owned news organizations are also more likely to uphold traditional networks of social control by choosing not to allow comments on their websites.
Research  comments 
march 2016 by paulbradshaw
Controlling the Conversation - Journalism Studies - Volume 17, Issue 2
Reader commenting forums of online newspaper sites allow newsreaders the opportunity to participate in an online conversation about the news topic at hand. By providing the forums, journalists diffuse part of their gatekeeping responsibilities to non-journalist commenters, empowering them as secondary gatekeepers to decide what content appears alongside the news. To encourage constructive dialogue, however, virtually all comment-hosting newspapers require that online reader commenters remain civil in their comments. They recognize that incivility in the forums is toxic to their brand identity and serves to antagonize, polarize and silence the very readers they are trying to attract. To combat this, newspapers have developed strategies aimed at reducing incivility, including prohibiting anonymity or disallowing the forums altogether. In reasserting their agenda-setting and gatekeeping role in discouraging incivility, newspapers appear to be adopting a new strategy, as yet unquantified. In an examination of 2100 news stories from 50 US newspapers using a constructed-week sampling method, this research investigates the extent to which some news topics are more likely than others to appear with a commenting forum. Findings reveal that controversial news stories are more likely to appear without a commenting forum than non-controversial news stories, adding a new dimension to newspapers' ability to set the public agenda.
Research  comments 
february 2016 by paulbradshaw
Editorial Policies, Journalistic Output and Reader Comments - Journalism Studies - Volume 17, Issue 2
This article investigates how reader comments are related to editorial policies and journalistic output. It attempts to explore differences and similarities between popular and quality online newspapers in terms of readers' reaction to different subject categories. Our findings, based on a quantitative content analysis of two serious-popular and one semi-serious online newspaper in Turkey, revealed a number of parallels between editorial choices and reader comments. First, the distribution of reader comments on popular newspapers resembled each other in that sports and entertainment constituted a substantial proportion of overall comments. Moreover, subject categories that ranked high on the home pages of online newspapers ranked high in reader comments as well. Thus, the news categories prioritized by online newspapers on their home pages not only constituted the bulk of their journalistic output but also accounted for the majority of reader comments. We argue, in the light of our findings, that the public sphere created by reader comments has a number of structural limitations which seriously undermine its potential to support a more deliberative democracy and more participatory journalism. The dominance of soft-news categories on the home pages of popular newspapers not only narrows the range of information available for the general public but also largely confines reader comments into a restricted selection of subject categories which are heavily imbalanced in favour of sports and entertainment.
Research  comments 
february 2016 by paulbradshaw
Persuasion from Below? - Journalism Practice -
Guided by the belief that anonymity inevitably breeds the kind of uncivil discourse that hurts their readers, many news organizations have chosen to ban anonymous comments sections on their websites in recent years. Unfortunately, little empirical research has been conducted to assess whether exposure to anonymous comments actually does influence people's attitudes. In this paper, we address this oversight by asking: do anonymous comments posted on a newspaper website shape how internet users feel about the media? Using an online experiment to systematically manipulate exposure to anonymous comments attached to a “hard news” report, we find strong evidence that exposure to non-attributed posts—regardless of their tone—leads internet users to feel more negatively towards specific news organizations and the media in general.
comments  Research  anonymity 
december 2015 by paulbradshaw
Discussing the News - Digital Journalism - Volume 3, Issue 6
The provision of online news provides unique opportunities for users to interact with content and with other users. One of the more common forms of interactivity involves commenting on news stories. These interactive features are often heralded for enabling virtual public discussion of current events. Yet there exists a widespread belief that these spaces fail to meet that lofty goal, instead exhibiting hostile and vitriolic discourse, which undermines the deliberative potential of online interaction. At the same time, there is a lack of consensus among researchers regarding the proper conceptualization of hostility, and its more desirable counterpart, civility. This article aims to integrate normative and contextual conceptual definitions of hostility and civility in online interactions with the news. Building on these, we develop operational definitions of the two concepts and analyze the presence of hostile and civil discussion in user comments posted to YouTube news videos. Further, we explore the possibility that the content and source of those news videos, as well as popularity and engagement metrics, may explain the degree of hostility and civility in comments.
Comments  Research  YouTube 
october 2015 by paulbradshaw
Goodbye, Comments: The Rise of Curated Conversations | Idea Lab
Take The Atlantic. Their cover story, on mass incarceration, was closed for comments, but the conversation around Ta-Nehisi Coates’ essay popped everywhere around the site and on the web. So the team selected some emails, comments, and blog posts in other sites and started, in a series called “debating mass incarceration,” to highlight good comments and do small reply-stories (is this a thing?).
comments  curation 
october 2015 by paulbradshaw
PURSUING THE IDEAL - Digital Journalism -
Many news organizations provide online readers with an opportunity to comment on public issues in the news through a news-mediated forum for discourse. These spaces are provided by news organizations as part of a mission to provide a public space for discourse, but are governed by a commenting policy that establishes the rules for discourse and behavior. These rules can help to meet the ideals of public discourse or stand in the way of productive public deliberation. This study examines the commenting policies of 21 news corporations in the United States to see how the policies facilitate or inhibit the creation of a space for ideal public discourse. A constant comparative analysis of the policies guided by the ideals of Habermas’ public sphere, as well as the expectations of civility norms, shows that news organizations establish rules to protect respectful and egalitarian spaces for the public, but fail to meet other critical needs of public discourse, including rationality, tolerance, reflexivity, and the pursuit of common understanding and solutions. The implications of these findings are further explored and possible objectives for news organizations are provided.
comments  Research 
october 2015 by paulbradshaw
What happened after 7 news sites got rid of reader comments » Nieman Journalism Lab
posts that have the most comments on them are not necessarily the most popular posts. But often, what was happening was that the posts with the most negative comments on them were the most popular posts because they were the culture posts. That sort of disconnect between what one vocal minority of the audience was saying, and what the huge majority of the audience was reading, was causing some whiplash.
I don’t know that you can engineer around bad habits of a community. I just don’t think that’s gonna work. I think you actually need to establish norms of behavior that people will follow because they care about the space. We can roll out a million product tools to help us deal with bad actors, but what we actually need to do is build a community that doesn’t allow bad actors to flourish in the first place.
comments  research 
september 2015 by paulbradshaw
Examining the benefits of audience integration - Digital Journalism -
This study investigates whether sharing of or commenting on online news enhances loyalty toward online news outlets. We identify two mediators of audience integration and loyalty: satisfaction and trust, which are measured by attitudinal attributions toward a news outlet. Loyalty is measured by frequently and exclusively using an online news outlet and an absent willingness to change to another online news outlet in the future. The relations between audience integration, satisfaction, trust, and loyalty are estimated with a mediation model. Results from an online survey with N = 1825 Swiss online news users reveal small but significant effects of sharing and commenting quantities on loyalty. Sharing tends to increase satisfaction, which in turn enhances loyalty. In contrast, commenting deteriorates satisfaction and trust, but directly improves loyalty. Overall, sharing and commenting slightly increase loyalty. In conclusion, sharing has a small, positive attitudinal relationship-building capacity for online news outlets, whereas commenting does not. Nonetheless, commenting features should not be abandoned by news outlets.
Research  comments  sharing  trust 
august 2015 by paulbradshaw
After deciding to charge for comments, Tablet’s conversation moves…to Facebook » Nieman Journalism Lab
Tablet was using Facebook’s comment platform. And since making the switch, most of the commenting has simply migrated to Tablet’s Facebook page, Newhouse said — noting that Facebook and other social platforms were already hosting much of the conversation around Tablet’s stories.
Comments  fb 
june 2015 by paulbradshaw
Ev Williams' Rules for Quality Content in the Clickbait Age | WIRED
Williams prefers to call out the total time Medium visitors spend reading, a metric he calls “TTR.” So, visitors spent 1.5 million hours reading on Medium last month. Williams says unique visitors, the standard metric cited by online publishers to gauge the size and value of their audiences, is “a highly volatile and meaningless number for what we’re trying to do.”
Comments  metrics  medium  ttr 
april 2015 by paulbradshaw
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