nynate17 + native   203

NCAI video I Am Not A Mascot
Native People speak out about being a mascot. Video: 3:15
Mascot  Native  Americans  Indians  sports  derogatory  2810  2610  NCAI 
8 weeks ago by nynate17
NCAI Releases Report on History and Legacy of Washington’s Harmful “Indian” Sports Mascot
Published on OCT 10, 2013
Washington, DC – Just days after President Obama joined the growing chorus of those calling for the Washington NFL Team to consider changing its name, the team’s leadership justified the use of their “Indian” mascot as a central part of the team’s “history and legacy.” A new report released today by the National Congress of American Indians (NCAI), titled Ending the Legacy Of Racism in Sports & the Era of Harmful “Indian” Sports Mascots also outlines the team’s ugly and racist legacy, while highlighting the harmful impact of negative stereotypes on Native peoples.
The report details the position of NCAI, the nation’s oldest, largest, and most representative American Indian and Alaska Native organization. The following is a statement released by NCAI’s Executive Director Jacqueline Pata along with the report:  
“The report NCAI has released today provides the history of an overwhelming movement to end the era of harmful “Indian” mascots – including the fact that Native peoples have fought these mascots since 1963 and no professional sports team has established a new ‘Indian’ mascot since 1964. 
There is one thing that we can agree with the Washington football team about - the name ‘Redsk*ns’ is a reflection of the team’s legacy and history. Unfortunately, the team’s legacy and history is an ugly one, rooted in racism and discrimination, including the origins of the team’s name. It is becoming more and more obvious that the team’s legacy on racial equality is to remain on the wrong side of history for as long as possible.
The team’s original owner, George Preston Marshall, named the team the ‘Redsk*ns’ in 1932, just months before he led a 13-year league wide ban on African American players in the NFL. Nearly 30 years after the race-based name was chosen, Marshall was forced by the league to hire the team’s first black player in 1962. He was the last NFL owner to do so.
Football  sports  mascots  NFL  Redskins  Indian  American  Native  slur  NCAI  2810  2610 
8 weeks ago by nynate17
Change the Mascot.org
Supporters of Change
Native Nations Unite to Speak Out Against Racially Offensive Mascot Name

More than 30 national Native American organizations across the county have spoken out against the use of the racist R-word as the Washington D.C. National Football League team’s mascot, including the National Congress of American Indians (NCAI), the oldest, largest and most representative American Indian and Alaska Native organization, representing about 70 percent of Native Americans (nearly 800,000 people) living on reservations. In addition, United South and Eastern Tribes Inc. (USET), an inter-tribal organization with 26 federally-recognized Tribal Nations representing over 65,000 Native Americans, and over 40 Individual Tribal Governments and leaders have passed resolutions or issued statements condemning the use of the racist term.

United South and Eastern Tribes (USET) Passes Resolution “Calling on the National Football League to End the Use of the Washington, D.C. racially offensive slur Team Mascot Name” at annual meeting.

USET is an inter-tribal organization comprised of 26 federally recognized tribes from Maine, to Florida, to Texas. USET represents its member Tribes at the regional and national level, operating through various workgroups and committees, and providing a forum for the exchange of ideas and information among Tribes, agencies and governments.

The following are letters from several Indian Nations to The Honorable Maria Cantwell, Chairwoman of the Senate Committee on Indian Affairs, expressing strong opposition to the use of the term “Redskins” by the NFL and the Washington team. Note: I also copied this to my 2810 related folder in my Notes app. And made a PDF of the web page, stored it in 2810 Compiled folder.
Mascots  Native  American  Indian  2810  2610  sports  youth  indigenous  indigenous_peoples 
8 weeks ago by nynate17
NCAI Statement on Maine Governor's Ban on Use of Native-Themed Mascots
NCAI applauds the recent signing of a bill making Maine the first state to ban the use of all Native “themed” mascots and imagery in public schools, colleges, and universities. The signing of this bill becomes the most comprehensive mascot legislation to pass to date. Maine joins other government bodies in setting an example of a government honoring the state’s tribal nations and signifies the state’s respect for all of its citizens.

Since 1968, NCAI has diligently opposed derogatory and harmful stereotypes of Native peoples in media and popular culture, which includes sports mascots and related imagery. During the past 51 years, hundreds of tribal nations, national and regional tribal organizations, civil rights organizations, school boards, sports teams, sports and media personalities, and individuals have called for the end to harmful Native-themed mascots. This stance is further supported by social science research conducted by the American Psychological Association that found derogatory “Indian” sports mascots have negative psychological, social and cultural impacts on Native people, especially Native youth.
Native  Youth  Mascots  Maine  Ban  sports  2810  2610  Indian  American 
8 weeks ago by nynate17
With Control of the Senate at Stake, Native Voters Travel a Bumpy Road to the Polling Place
With Control of the Senate at Stake, Native Voters Travel a Bumpy Road to the Polling Place
November 4, 2014, Updated November 5, 2014
by Stephanie Woodard
Turning out for an election is not a simple matter on a reservation. Vehicles are often shared by several impoverished families, and gas money is hard to come by.
Donna Semans runs Four Directions’ get-out-the-vote, or GOTV, operation on the Oglala Sioux Tribe’s Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, in South Dakota. Since mid-October, her team has transported voters from around the 2.1-million acre reservation to a polling place in Pine Ridge Village. There they can register and cast a no-excuse absentee ballot ahead of Election Day.

To obtain early voting on their reservations, tribal members on Pine Ridge brought two federal lawsuits, against Fall River County in 2012 and in 2014 against Jackson County, which overlaps the reservation’s northwestern corner and administers elections there. Both suits were organized by Four Directions, which works to create structural improvements in Indian vote access — such as establishment of early voting offices on reservations — in addition to doing GOTV.
2810  Native  american  vote  Indian  reservation  absentee  ballot  cars  shared  2014  GOTV 
november 2018 by nynate17
Pride or Prejudice?
Pride or Prejudice?
Buttoned-down college boys were drawn to mascots who stood for a noble but violent masculinity.
By Naomi Schaefer Riley


July 31, 2015 3:28 p.m. ET
‘Defenses of Native American mascotry often rely on personal anecdotes and polling data,” writes Jennifer Guiliano—disapprovingly—in “Indian Spectacle.” She complains that an AP poll about the Indian names and symbols used in college athletics surveyed only “0.000322 percent of the [U.S.] population.” It almost seems as if Ms. Guiliano doesn’t grasp how statistical sampling works.
NOTE: This is the article referred to in the prior bookmark written by Tara Houska, "'Wall Street Journal' Column Claims Mascots Honor Native Americans; This Native American Begs to Differ"
Posted: 08/05/2015 6:25 pm EDT Updated: 08/05/2015 6:59 pm EDT
2810  mascot  mascots  Indian  Native  Americans  sports 
november 2018 by nynate17
Wall Street Journal' Column Claims Mascots Honor Native Americans; This Native American Begs to Differ Posted: 08/05/2015 6:25 pm EDT Updated: 08/05/2015 6:59 pm EDT
Author: Tara Houska
citizen of Couchiching First Nation, tribal rights attorney, notyourmascots.org co-founder
Starting with a dig at those who would dare question the polling data in support of Native American mascots, last Friday, Naomi Shaefer Riley published commentary in the Wall Street Journal that managed to dismiss Native American voices while simultaneously patronizing our experiences.

Her approach is nothing new, but noteworthy in that she actually bothered to research a few Native American perspectives before casting them aside.

Riley's column was based upon a book written by Jennifer Guiliano, titled Indian Spectacle. The book covers the history of Native American mascots, beginning in the 1920s. Guiliano posited that Native mascots were a method to lure in college goers. These mascots were an exciting addition to football games that represented both the savage, capable of barely restrained violence, as well the noble savage, a reminder of the fighting spirit extinguished by America.

Here is where Riley goes off the rails.

She buys into the concept of noble savage and goes on to cite the Boy Scouts use of Native imagery to "instill character." Riley appears to be entirely unaware of the harms tied to the relegation of existing peoples to a one-size-fits-all historical romantic caricature.

The noble savage is a white-washed representation of American exceptionalism, a mythical figure who teaches school children that Manifest Destiny was a patriotic act that ended the tale of Native America for the onset of a new and better world. It overlooks the genocide endured by Native Americans, the theft of children, lands, and cultures that still occur today.

Riley's assessment bypasses the fundamental issue of Native American nations continuing to exist. Her perceived positives of physical prowess, bravery, and resistance uphold the narrative of Native Americans as conquered people of the past.
2810  mascots  mascot  Indian  Native  American  sports  teams 
november 2018 by nynate17
The Man Who Put Andrew Jackson in Trump’s Oval Office
Historian Walter Russell Mead has become the favorite Trump whisperer for everyone from Steve Bannon to Tom Cotton.

By SUSAN B. GLASSER January 22, 2018

A few months ago, the historian Walter Russell Mead got a text message out of the blue from an unknown number. It turned out to be White House chief strategist Steve Bannon. Bannon, not yet banished from Trump’s inner circle, had a surprising story to tell the wonky scholar of American foreign policy: Mead, he said, was the reason President Andrew Jackson’s portrait now occupied a controversial place of honor in Donald Trump’s Oval Office.

Bannon had seized on Mead’s work as part of his war on the other factions inside Trump’s White House, and especially the hyperentitled family members like son-in-law Jared Kushner and “globalists” like national security adviser H.R. McMaster he viewed as selling out Trump’s “America First” vision to the more conventional course preferred by the Washington establishment. In the rumpled Mead and his writings about the “Jacksonian” tradition in American foreign policy, Bannon saw a populist kindred spirit—and a suitably rabble-rousing model for the anti-establishment course he hoped Trump would follow.

Trump agreed, which is why the Jackson portrait went up and the president was visiting Old Hickory’s Tennessee home within weeks of his inauguration, never mind the instant outcry that greeted Trump’s embrace of a slave-holding, Native American-fighting early 19th century predecessor as his role model. “That’s what Steve Bannon told me,” Mead recalled in a new interview for The Global Politico, our weekly podcast on world affairs. “There was this Jacksonian moment.”

Even now, exactly a year after Trump’s inauguration, Mead says that while Bannon has been purged from the White House, Bannonism—and by extension the bowdlerized, 21st century version of Jacksonianism he was peddling—has not. If you want to understand Trump’s otherwise incomprehensible presidency, Mead argues, you need to understand America’s seventh president.

Trump’s embrace of Jackson as a governing philosophy has been decidedly controversial. To critics, it’s barely veiled racism, a signaling to Trump’s overwhelmingly white political base that is hardly subtle considering Jackson’s rapidly declining historical reputation. A slave owner and general once celebrated as the conquering hero of the Battle of New Orleans, Jackson is perhaps better known today as a fighter against Native Americans whose tactics were so brutal that the Obama administration announced in 2016 it was booting him from the $20 bill. When Trump recently hosted Native American leaders in the Oval Office and pictures circulated of them standing with the Jackson portrait in the background, Twitter was filled with commentary about the president’s boorish slight of his guests.
2810  US  politics  2017  2018  Navajo  Code  Talkers  Trump  Bannon  Andrew  Jackson  Native  American  Removal  Act  Indians 
november 2018 by nynate17
Trump doesn't understand history': Native Americans tell their story in DC
As a Smithsonian exhibition takes on stereotypes and a Cherokee-written play takes the stage, Native American voices are being amplified. Will the president – and the public – get the message?
David Smith in Washington

@smithinamerica
Sun 11 Feb 2018 01.00 EST Last modified on Sun 11 Feb 2018 05.18 EST
“Indians are less than 1% of the population. Yet images and names of Indians are everywhere. How is it that Indians can be so present and so absent in American life?”

This is the question posed by Americans, a new exhibition at the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, exploring how Native Americans have been central to America’s sense of itself even as they were systematically persecuted, marginalised and erased.

The myth-busting show contains an array of nearly 300 objects and images of Indians and Indian stereotypes. They include a Tomahawk flight-test missile, a 1948 Indian Chief motorcycle, a Washington Redskins football team baby blanket, photos of presidents and celebrities wearing feather headdresses, footage from westerns and scale models of Chinook, Kiowa and Apache Longbow helicopters.

“Indians are less than 1% of the population. Yet images and names of Indians are everywhere. How is it that Indians can be so present and so absent in American life?”

This is the question posed by Americans, a new exhibition at the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, exploring how Native Americans have been central to America’s sense of itself even as they were systematically persecuted, marginalised and erased.

The myth-busting show contains an array of nearly 300 objects and images of Indians and Indian stereotypes. They include a Tomahawk flight-test missile, a 1948 Indian Chief motorcycle, a Washington Redskins football team baby blanket, photos of presidents and celebrities wearing feather headdresses, footage from westerns and scale models of Chinook, Kiowa and Apache Longbow helicopters.

“Indians are less than 1% of the population. Yet images and names of Indians are everywhere. How is it that Indians can be so present and so absent in American life?”

This is the question posed by Americans, a new exhibition at the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, exploring how Native Americans have been central to America’s sense of itself even as they were systematically persecuted, marginalised and erased.

The myth-busting show contains an array of nearly 300 objects and images of Indians and Indian stereotypes. They include a Tomahawk flight-test missile, a 1948 Indian Chief motorcycle, a Washington Redskins football team baby blanket, photos of presidents and celebrities wearing feather headdresses, footage from westerns and scale models of Chinook, Kiowa and Apache Longbow helicopters.

Americans was conceived during Barack Obama’s presidency but arrives in the shadow of Donald Trump. Many Native American activists praised Obama for doing more than any other US president to recognise their grievances, including the government’s historical neglect of treaty obligations. Trump’s biggest impression so far, as a bang-up-to-date digital display acknowledges, is using the term “Pocahontas” to insult Senator Elizabeth Warren over her claims to Cherokee ancestry.

But even as Native Americans find their rights under renewed threat, for example from the Keystone XL and Dakota Access oil pipelines, their cultural voice is growing stronger. Last month the Cleveland Indians baseball team announced that they will drop the red-faced Chief Wahoo caricature from their uniforms next year, bowing to decades of complaints. One of Washington’s leading theatres is staging Sovereignty, a new play that incorporates Cherokee language and is written by Mary Kathryn Nagle, a playwright, lawyer and citizen of Cherokee nation.

Speaking on a panel with the author and cast on the first day of rehearsal, Molly Smith, artistic director of Arena Stage, said: “I have to tell you there’s a big upswing in Native American plays being produced around the country. It is your time. So it’s pretty thrilling that this voice is now being heard.”
2810  Trump  Native  Americans  Smithsonian  museum  2018  stereotypes  mascots 
november 2018 by nynate17
Welcome to the white man's world': police officer accused of shocking attack on Latino teen
Massachusetts officer charged with civil rights violations for 2016 arrest during which he allegedly spit on and kicked teen.

he charges stem from arrests made in February 2016 after a group of juveniles allegedly stole an unmarked police vehicle after a Springfield detective left it idling in a parking lot. Photograph: Spencer Platt/Getty Images

A Massachusetts police officer accused of spitting on and kicking a Latino teen during an arrest in 2016 while yelling “welcome to the white man’s world”, has been arrested and charged with three counts of federal civil rights violations.

According to the indictment, Springfield officer Gregg Bigda also threatened to “stick a fucking kilo of coke in [the juvenile’s] pocket and put [the juvenile] away for fucking 15 years”, and to “fucking kill [the juvenile] in the parking lot”.

Those comments, which came during an interrogation after the arrest, were captured on video and publicly released by the Springfield Republican in 2016. In the footage Bigda can be heard yelling “I’m not hampered by the f**ing truth ‘cause I don’t give a f**k! People like you belong in jail. I’ll charge you with whatever!”

In the indictment, prosecutors described the officer’s actions as “so abusive that it shocks the conscience”.

Harold Shaw, the special agent in charge of the FBI investigation into the incident added: “Badges and guns do not come with the authority to ignore the constitution or the rights of others, and those who violate it will be held accountable.”
Native  American  civil  rights  violation  police  officer  Massachusetts  2810 
november 2018 by nynate17
Thousands of Native voters in North Dakota getting free IDs By BLAKE NICHOLSON today
October 31, 2018
BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) — BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) — Efforts by American Indian tribes in North Dakota to provide free identification with street addresses to thousands of members in advance of Tuesday’s election are cutting into the number of Native Americans who could potentially be turned away at the polls for lack of a proper ID under recently tightened state rules.

The free programs launched with the help of groups including the Lakota People’s Law Project and the Four Directions nonprofit so far have provided more than 2,000 voters on four reservations with the proper credentials. The effort to ensure a strong Native American vote comes amid uproar over what some believe is an attempt to suppress their votes.

“We’re at our best in crisis,” said Phyllis Young, an organizer on the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation for the Lakota People’s Law Project, adding that the issue “is only making us more aware of our rights, more energized, and more likely to vote this November.”

Stricter voter ID rules are taking effect after a U.S. Supreme Court ruling earlier this month allowed the state to continue requiring street addresses, as opposed to other addresses such as post office boxes. Street addresses have never been important in the Native American culture, and many tribal members aren’t aware of their address, don’t have a provable one because they’re homeless or stay with friends or relatives, or can’t afford to get an updated ID with a street address assigned through the statewide 911 system.

A federal lawsuit filed Tuesday by the Spirit Lake Sioux also alleges that the 911 system on reservations is “characterized by disarray, errors, confusion, and missing or conflicting addresses.” It seeks to have the residential address requirement ruled unconstitutional as it applies to Native American voters, and asks for an emergency order while the lawsuit proceeds barring the state from enforcing the requirement on Native Americans on or near reservations or who are at risk of disenfranchisement.
North  Dakota  Natives  suppressing  voting  rights  Native  Americans  Supreme  Court  vote  suppression  state  Republican  majority 
november 2018 by nynate17
Programs affiliated with Native American tribes provide free IDs in North Dakota
BY EMILY BIRNBAUM - 10/31/18 05:40 PM EDT

Multiple Native American tribes in North Dakota have launched programs to provide tribal members with free ID cards ahead of the midterm elections, according to a new Associated Press report.

The Standing Rock Sioux, Spirit Lake Sioux, Turtle Mountain Chippewa and Three Affiliated Tribes have all launched programs that have successfully given free IDs to thousands of Native Americans, the news service reported.

Together, the programs have disseminated a total of more than 2,000 IDs.

A Supreme Court ruling earlier this month upheld North Dakota rules that require voters to provide identification with street addresses. This rule would have disenfranchised around 5,000 Native Americans who did not psossess a qualifying voter ID under state rules, the AP reported.

Voting rights activists in the state say knowing one's address is not particularly important in Native American culture. Many tribal members in the state either don't know their home address, don't have one, or can't afford to get an updated ID.

The Lakota People's Law Project and the Four Directions nonprofit have helped to coordinate the dissemination of free IDs with proper street addresses to people who did not previously have them ahead of the November elections, the AP reported. The groups say the new Supreme Court ruling and state rules amount to voter suppression of Native people.

"We're at our best in crisis," Phyllis Young, an organizer for the Lakota People's Law Project, told the AP. "[This] is only making us more aware of our rights, more energized, and more likely to vote this November."

The effort comes as Sen. Heidi Heitkamp (D) is seeking to defend her seat against a strong challenge from Rep. Kevin Cramer (R).

A recent poll found Heitkamp trailing Kramer by 16 points.
2810  Native  American  AmericanIndian  voting  rights  North  Dakota  ID  address  Supreme  Court  voter  suppression 
november 2018 by nynate17
Republicans wanted to suppress the Native American vote. It's working Julian Brave NoiseCat.
Opinion
Native Americans
Voter fraud barely exists, yet laws are being passed in states such as North Dakota that do nothing but strip the civil rights of indigenous peoples.

‘In the 2018 midterms, Heidi Heitkamp’s re-election strategy – which could determine control of the Senate – relies on the Native American demographic.’ Photograph: REX/Shutterstock
Control of the Senate in the 2018 midterms may hang on the fate of Heidi Heitkamp, the right-leaning Democrat from North Dakota. But her victory will be nearly impossible without the votes of the Standing Rock Sioux tribe and other Native communities across the heavily Republican state. Now, those communities are facing an insidious new threat: voter ID laws designed to strip American Indians of the right to vote.

In 2012, Heitkamp won the race for the US Senate on a razor-thin margin of 3,000 votes. Her path to victory leaned heavily on support from North Dakota’s 46,000 Native Americans, who make up 5.5% of the state population and are a core Democratic constituency across the rural west. In the 2018 midterms, Heitkamp’s re-election strategy – which could determine control of the Senate – relies on this same indigenous demographic.

Study after study has shown that Republican hoopla about voter fraud is baseless
The Republican party is well aware of this. Just five months after the 2012 election, the Republican-held North Dakota legislature passed a new voting law without any hearings or debate on the bill’s final text. The law requires North Dakotans to present at a polling station a driver’s license, state ID, tribal ID or other form of identification deemed permissible by the secretary of state in order to exercise their right to vote. In 2015, the state made the law even stricter, prohibiting the use of student, military and expired IDs, limiting the use of absentee ballots without ID and freezing the list of acceptable forms of identification.
politics  Native  American  Indians  Heitkamp  re-election  voter  ID  fraudulent  Republicans 
november 2018 by nynate17
'Idaho's hope': could Paulette Jordan be the first Native American governor in the US?
The Democrat, whose grandparents were tribal chiefs, offers progressive solutions for a state struggling with healthcare, education and more.
On stage 16 hours later, when the Republican candidate, Brad Little, said Jordan’s “special interest” money came from Native American tribes, she didn’t let him finish.

“They’re not ‘special interest’,” said Jordan, a member of the Coeur d’Alene tribe, looking her opponent in the eye. “Tribes are called sovereign nations.”

“Oh, ‘sovereign nations’!” Little responded, throwing his hands up in the air.

“They are also individuals, human beings,” Jordan fired back.

It was a brief exchange, but one that stuck with Jordan, a 38-year-old indigenous woman vying to be Idaho’s first female leader and America’s first Native American governor.

“As someone who is part of the First Nations of this land, having been here for thousands of years, people forget that there were people here prior to their arrival,” Jordan said, later that night at a cocktail bar in Boise, where she was celebrating the debate with a small group of staff. “For him to scoff at that, to have this very arrogant mannerism towards it … it’s condescending and disrespectful to tribes.”

Jordan’s underdog campaign has shaken up politics in the west, bringing mainstream attention to disenfranchised communities and progressive policy ideas that GOP leaders typically overlook or treat with disdain. In the final week of the race in one of the reddest states in the country, her supporters and opponents are asking the same question: can she actually win?
Paulette  Jordan  Idaho  tribe  sovereign  nation  governor  Native  American 
november 2018 by nynate17
Peabody Essex Museum Gets Set of Native American Artifacts
A noted collection of more than 150 Native American artifacts, including wampum belts and finely beaded ceremonial garb, will stay – for now — where it has been housed for almost 70 years, at the Peabody Essex Museum in Salem, Mass., officials announced Thursday.

The collection is owned by the Andover Newton Theological School, the country’s oldest seminary, but has long been housed at the museum.

The Native American items in question, mostly gathered in the 19th century by Christian missionaries, are part of a larger art collection numbering over 1,100 items that the seminary is now giving to the museum. The other items include 19th century photographs and embroidery from China

The school has been cited by federal regulators for failing to adequately follow a law designed to ensure the return of sacred and other special artifacts to Native American tribes.
native  american  artifacts  return  burial  christian  missionaries  Graves  Protection  and  Repatriation  Act  museums 
november 2017 by nynate17
Dennis Banks, American Indian Civil Rights Leader, Dies at 80
Dennis J. Banks, the militant Chippewa who founded the American Indian Movement in 1968 and led often-violent insurrections to protest the treatment of Native Americans and the nation’s history of injustices against its indigenous peoples, died on Sunday night at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. He was 80. His daughter Tashina Banks Rama said the cause was complications of pneumonia following successful open-heart surgery a week ago at the clinic. Mr. Banks and his Oglala Sioux compatriot Russell Means were by the mid-1970s perhaps the nation’s best-known Native Americans since Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse, who led the attack that crushed the cavalry forces of Lt. Col. George Armstrong Custer at the Battle of the Little Bighorn in the Montana Territory in 1876.
Dennis  Banks  AIM  1970s  Native  American  Chippewa  BIA  Wounded  Knee 
november 2017 by nynate17
Silent Victims: hate crimes against Native Americans
Section:
Book Reviews
Silent Victims: Hate Crimes against Native Americans.
Barbara Perry.
Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 2008. 176 pp. Paper, $29.95.
Though reading about hate crimes in Indian Country can prove depressing, I held a feeling of hope after reading this book. Barbara Perry has uncovered themes that arise from the Native American victims and also left the reader armed with possible concrete steps for change. Perry's research interviews of nearly three hundred Native Americans from the Southwest Four Corners region, the Great Lakes, and the Northern Plains regions provide unique qualitative insights into the cycle of oppression and the cumulative effects of hate crimes. This book's purpose is to provide individual accounts while arguing that many hate crimes go unreported. Further, it contends that hate crimes are but one of many systemic practices that justify and maintain subordination of Native peoples, especially during times of activism. This book effectively reaches its objectives by succinctly contextualizing hate crimes within a historical and contemporary model of oppression, which could enlighten anyone interested in violence in Indian Country. The writing is straightforward and concise, which enables the reader to clearly follow the line of logic and remain engaged throughout.
This book is divided into three major sections. The first establishes the historical and sociopolitical context for hate crimes in the United States against Native Americans. The second section focuses on the findings from Perry's qualitative research and the cumulative impact of violence on the community. The last section demonstrates how activism and promotion of cultural education could strengthen the sovereignty of Native nations.
2810  Native  Americans  hate  crimes  non-fiction  Indians 
november 2017 by nynate17
A major Native American site is being looted. Will Obama risk armed confrontation to save it?
RIM OF CEDAR MESA, Utah — For centuries, humans have used the red sandstone canyons here as a way to mark their existence.

First came archaic hunter-gatherers who worked in Glen Canyon Linear, a crude geometrical style dating back more than 3,500 years. Then about 2,000 years later, early ancestral Pueblo farmers of the Basketmaker period used more subtle lines to produce a man in headdress. A little more than 700 years ago came their descendants, who used the same kind of hard river stone to make drawings of bighorn sheep and a flute player in the ancient rock.

Now, President Obama is weighing whether and how he can leave his own permanent imprint on history by designating about 2 million acres of land, known as the Bears Ears, as a national monument.
2810  Bears  Ears  monument  Obama  American  India  Native 
november 2016 by nynate17
About Dr. Devon Abbott Mihesuah
Cora Lee Beers Price Teaching Professor in International Cultural Understanding, PhD, author, scholar. BS; MEd; MA; PhD
Email: mihesuah@ku.edu
Humanities Program
University of Kansas
Bailey Hall
1440 Jayhawk Blvd., Room 308
Lawrence, KS 66045-7574
Has several blogs related to Indigenous eating/diet, among many other interests.
From the Humanities pages at the University of Kansas:
"Devon Mihesuah is the Cora Lee Beers Price Teaching Professor in International Cultural Understanding. She holds a Ph.D. in American History from Texas Christian University. Her career has been devoted to the empowerment and well-being of indigenous peoples. She served as Editor of the American Indian Quarterly for nine years. Her research, writing and speaking focuses on decolonization strategies and is one of the few indigenous writers who successfully writes non-fiction and fiction. She regularly speaks nationally and internationally about issues pertaining to empowerment of indigenous peoples;"
2810  scholar  native  american  studies  PhD  american  indian  diet  Kansas  University  speaker  food  indigenous 
november 2016 by nynate17
Cranberries, a Thanksgiving Staple, Were a Native American Superfood
The berry helped Indians and colonists survive.
By Sarah Whitman-Salkin, for National Geographic
PUBLISHED NOVEMBER 28, 2013
Every schoolchild learns that the Pilgrims couldn't have survived life in the New World without the help of the Indians. The tribes taught them which crops to plant. They introduced them to corn and other nutritional mainstays. One of these, the American cranberry, is still part of the classic Thanksgiving feast. (See more photos of cranberries.)

What you probably don't know, though, is that the cranberry was a key ingredient in the original energy bar, 400 years before anyone knew what a superfood was.

The Algonquin, Chippewa, and Cree, among others, gathered wild cranberries where they could find them in what is now Maine, Massachusetts, New Jersey, and Wisconsin, all the way west to Oregon and Washington, and north to areas of British Columbia and Quebec, according to Devon Mihesuah, a professor at the University of Kansas and an enrolled citizen of the Choctaw Nation. The berry was called sassamenesh (by the Algonquin) and ibimi (by the Wampanoag and Lenni-Lenape), which translates literally as "bitter" or "sour berries." Cranberries were used for everything from cooking to dyes for textiles to medicines.
2810  American  Indian  Native  American  cranberries  diet  Thanksgiving  superfood 
november 2016 by nynate17
Yvonne Chouteau, Native American Ballerina, Dies at 86 - The New York Times
Yvonne Chouteau, a former principal dancer of the Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo who emerged as one of a celebrated group of dancers known as the American Indian ballerinas of Oklahoma, died on Sunday at her home in Oklahoma City. She was 86. A dancer of great radiance and lyricism, Ms. Chouteau was one of five prominent Native American dancers who were raised in Oklahoma. The others were Rosella Hightower, Moscelyne Larkin, Maria Tallchief and her sister Marjorie Tallchief, now the last survivor.
2810  native  american  ballerina  dance  nytimes 
february 2016 by nynate17
Supreme Court Declines to Hear Jim Thorpe Appeal - The New York Times
By JOHN BRANCHOCT. 5, 2015 The remains of the athlete Jim Thorpe will remain in Jim Thorpe, Pa., after the United States Supreme Court declined to hear an appeal from the tribe and Thorpe’s family asking to have his remains returned to his boyhood home in what is now Oklahoma. The Sac and Fox Nation and two surviving sons of Thorpe said that the remains were taken by Thorpe’s widow during a sacred ceremony after Thorpe’s death in 1953. She later struck a deal with the Pennsylvania towns of Mauch Chunk and East Mauch Chunk, which agreed to build a monument for Thorpe and rename the merged borough in his honor. The tribe and Thorpe’s sons sued in 2010, citing the 1990 Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act.
2810  Jim  Thorpe  Native  American  Supreme  Court  Repatriation  Act 
november 2015 by nynate17
Who Speaks Wukchumni? A Vanishing Native American Language | TED-Ed
In this short film, Who Speaks Wukchumni?, we meet a Native American woman named Marie Wilcox, who is the last fluent speaker of Wukchumni, and the dictionary she created. Indigenous languages around the world are vanishing at a rapid rate. In this lesson, explore what could be lost when a language disappears.
2810  Native  American  language  languages  vanishing  lost  extinct  tribes  culture  Wukchumni 
october 2015 by nynate17
Attorney General’s Advisory Committee on American Indian/Alaska Native Children Exposed to Violence: Ending Violence so Children Can Thrive
Nov. 2014 report. Attorney General’s Advisory Committee on American Indian and Alaska Native Children Exposed to Violence: Ending Violence So Children Can Thrive This report was created as part of the Defending Childhood Initiative created by Attorney General Eric H. Holder, Jr. This initiative strives to harness resources from across the Department of Justice to: • Prevent children’s exposure to violence; • Mitigate the negative impact of children’s exposure to violence when it does occur; and • Develop knowledge and spread awareness about children’s exposure to violence. The U.S. Attorney General's advisory committee on Native children says prevention, treatment programs and case workers have proven to be more effective than incarceration.
2810  law  violence  Native  children  youth  government  attorney  general  healing  education 
august 2015 by nynate17
Juvenile Justice System Failing Native Americans, Studies Show : NPR
State courts are twice as likely to incarcerate Native teens for minor crimes such as truancy and alcohol use than any other racial and ethnic group, according to the Tribal Law and Policy Institute. And juvenile detention facilities around the country have a disproportionately high number of Native American youth, according to an Indian Law and Order Commission report. On the reservation, it's different. On a recent visit to the Navajo Nation juvenile detention center in Tuba City, it's quiet. "Right now we don't have anybody in custody," says Sgt. Barbara Johnson. The Navajo Nation "is really reluctant on sentencing youth to these facilities. It's used more as a last resort, so our population has been very, very low," says Corrections Lt. Robbin Preston. The U.S. Attorney General's advisory committee on Native children says prevention, treatment programs and case workers have proven to be more effective than incarceration.
2810  native  youth  Navajo  prejudice  crimes  NPR  incarceration  courts  law 
august 2015 by nynate17
Tribal Identity | Pechanga.net
A news site for all issues related to North American Native peoples.
2810  tribal  identity  status  federal  recognition  tribes  political  issues  news  native  american  Canada  First  Nations 
march 2015 by nynate17
Waneek Horn-Miller Bio for Speaking | The Lavin Agency Speakers Bureau
"Young, frank, and hopeful, Waneek Horn-Miller has overcome discrimination, self-doubt, and an infamous incident of violence to emerge as one of North America's most inspiring Native speakers. With purpose and poise, she traverses the intersection of two generations of Native people, working to mend—finally—the dysfunctional relationship between Native and non-Native communities through social and political change."
2810  Native  First  Nations  Canada  role-model  role  model  Aboriginal  issues  Olympian 
march 2015 by nynate17
Encore: Living Outside Tribal Lines | Moyers & Company | BillMoyers.com
"Moyers interviews Sherman Alexie as well as looks at other issues, like Silicon Valley haves and have-nots. At about 14:00 min of the Alexie interview, Alexie reads his poem about Yo Yo Ma. At 20:00 minute his Facebook sonnet and his critique of Internet communication being 1 dimensional. He is bipolar, and feels all of Native America is bipolar. Sherry Turkle is mentioned. Like Mr. Williams, the lawyer and scholar, Alexie identifies some of the same western cultural tendencies of placing Natives in the past and leaving them there, or using them as sports mascots or other stereotypes.
2810  video  Bill  Moyers  interviews  tribal  Sherman  Alexie  native  american  stereotypes  mascots 
march 2015 by nynate17
Bill Moyers Web Extra: American Indians Confront “Savage Anxieties”
Posted December 26, 2014. "This week Bill speaks with legal expert Robert A. Williams Jr. about how stereotypes of American Indians have been codified into laws and government policies, with devastating consequences. Great video! In this web extra, Bill speaks with Williams about why none of the Supreme Court justices “wants Indian cases,” Hollywood’s use of “savage” imagery, the Redskins controversy and much more. Williams also talks to Bill about the difference between racist attitudes toward African-Americans and American Indians historically. “Much of the thrust of federal Indian policy, really until the 1960s, was forcibly assimilating Indians into white models of civilization,” Williams says. “African-Americans were continually asking to be integrated, to be accepted on equal terms. What Indians have consistently asked for is what we call a degree of measured separatism. They want that ability to live on their reservation, to perpetuate their culture, to speak their language.”
2810  native  american  Indian  law  Supreme  Court  savages  video  interview  Bill  Moyers  English  2810  Lit  &  Experience  link  language  treaties  Treaty  of  Manhattan 
march 2015 by nynate17
American Indian Boarding Schools Haunt Many : NPR
"In 1886, the government published the Annual Report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs to the Secretary of the Interior. It established the attitudes of Indian Affairs Agents in the early days of federal boarding schools. The report was a compilation of agent reports; the agents largely saw Indians as savages who should be compelled using whatever means necessary to send their children to schools." "In the 1920s, the federal government commissioned a groundbreaking investigation into the outcome of government policies toward American Indians, including boarding schools. The report that followed in 1928, The Problem of Indian Administration (also called the Meriam Report after Lewis Meriam, who supervised the study), found that children at federal boarding schools were malnourished, overworked, harshly punished and poorly educated." "More than 40 years after the Meriam Report . . . a report known as the Kennedy Report declared Indian education a national tragedy."
NPR  native  american  teachinghistory  2810  Indian  Boarding  Schools  BIA  Pratt  Meriam  Report  Kennedy  Report  Indian  native  abuse  education  cultural  genocide  sociolinguistics 
march 2015 by nynate17
Carlisle Indian School's History Must Be Preserved So Those Who Suffered Aren't Forgotten - ICTMN.com
by Suzan Shown Harjo 10/11/12 "When the U.S. Army decided to raze the Farmhouse at the former Carlisle Indian Industrial School (CIIS), it caused such an uproar that the Army started consulting with the Mohawk and Seneca Nations. Consultation should have come first, of course, and more needs to be done. The Army says the Farmhouse was neither historic nor significant enough to be placed with other CIIS buildings on the National Register of Historic Places, but how would it know without knowing our history? For many of us, the Farmhouse is family history. My mother’s grandparents, mother and two aunts lived in the dairyman’s cottage in the early 1890s; their third daughter was born there. Great-grandfather Thunderbird (Nonoma’ohtsevehahtse), a.k.a., Richard Davis, was Cheyenne and born in the Dog Men Society camp. "In 1794 “General George Washington used Carlisle Barracks, then called Washingtonburg, as a rallying point of…13,000 state militia troops to suppress the Whiskey Rebellion"
2810  native  american  mohawk  seneca  Carlisle  Indian  boarding  school  historic  George  Washington  family  history  tribal  Harjo 
march 2015 by nynate17
American Indians and Alaska Native Veterans Have Higher Mortality Rate After Surgery than Caucasians, Study Finds
1 June 2005 article about the work that Dr. Lori Arviso Alvord has done as faculty at Dartmouth Medical School. Contributing to growing literature on marked racial and ethnic disparities in US healthcare, a study led by Dartmouth Medical School has concluded that American Indians and Alaska Natives have a greater chance of death within 30 days of surgery and suffer more from several preoperative risks compared to Caucasian patients. Published in the June issue of the Journal of the American College of Surgeons (JACS), the Dartmouth Medical School-led study is the largest to explore surgical outcomes in the American Indian population. "As a nation, we want to deliver healthcare that is equal across all ethnic groups and races, but we're finding that some disparities exist," said lead author, Dr. Lori Arviso Alvord, assistant professor of surgery and of psychiatry at Dartmouth Medical School. Dr. Alvord is the first Navajo woman surgeon in the U.S. [slcc, she asked: ? no ceremonial wknd
2810  Native  Doctor  Lori  Arviso  Alvord  Dartmouth  surgeon  surgery 
march 2015 by nynate17
To Some in California, Founder of Church Missions Is Far From Saint- The New York Times
For generations, fourth graders in California’s schools, often with a parent’s touch, built models of church missions out of poster board or sugar cubes to celebrate the Rev. Junipero Serra and the religious communities he established along the West Coast in the late 1700s. Last week, Pope Francis announced plans to canonize Father Serra, putting “the evangelizer of the West in the United States” closer to sainthood. These days, the pious preacher who once walked much of what is now California, bringing Christianity to the American Indians, is viewed in less benevolent terms. Prominent Native Americans see Father Serra as far from saintly. Their reaction is as visceral as a dispute over occupied territory in the Middle East. Indian historians and authors blame Father Serra for the suppression of their culture and the premature deaths at the missions of thousands of their ancestors.
2810  california  catholicism  missions  nativeamericans  Native  Americans  religion  Westward  movement 
january 2015 by nynate17
Browse by Category - Native American Studies | UT Press
Various books, including eBooks available via EBSCO and JSTOR. I'll have to see what they published and see if they show up in SLCC library holdings.
2810  native  american  studies  ebooks  University  of  Texas  literature  history 
november 2014 by nynate17
Recovering Languages and Literacies of the Americas
The Recovering Languages and Literacies of the Americas Initiative The world's linguistic diversity is diminishing, with more than two hundred languages declared extinct and thousands more endangered. As these languages disappear, deep stores of knowledge and cultural memory are also lost. The scholarly significance of these endangered and extinct languages and literacies provides the impetus for this collaborative initiative supported by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation: Recovering Languages and Literacies of the Americas. Areas of Interest: University of Nebraska Press—indigenous language and literacy in North America University of Oklahoma Press—native languages and literacies of North America and Central America The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation currently makes grants in five core program areas. Within each of its core programs, the Foundation concentrates most of its grantmaking in a few areas. see also: http://www.mellon.org/about/mission/
2810  native  american  languages  retention  literacy  preservation  native  language  publications 
november 2014 by nynate17
Book Review of: Silent Victims: Hate Crimes against Native Americans
Silent Victims: Hate Crimes against Native Americans. Barbara Perry. Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 2008. 176 pp. Paper, $29.95. This book's purpose is to provide individual accounts while arguing that many hate crimes go unreported. Further, it contends that hate crimes are but one of many systemic practices that justify and maintain subordination of Native peoples, especially during times of activism. This book effectively reaches its objectives by succinctly contextualizing hate crimes within a historical and contemporary model of oppression, which could enlighten anyone interested in violence in Indian Country. This book is divided into three major sections. The first establishes the historical and sociopolitical context for hate crimes in the United States against Native Americans. The second section focuses on the findings from Perry's qualitative research and the cumulative impact of violence on the community. The last section demonstrates how activism and promotion of cul
2810  native  americans  hate  crimes  SLCC  library  activism  prejudice  retaliation  majority  oppression 
november 2014 by nynate17
American Indian Quarterly - Publication details on SLCC database Academic Search Premier
Lists all issues from 1990 to current year (which is 2014 right now). Good bookmark to make on your browser,
2810  American  Indian  Quarterly  AIQ  database  list  native  journal  SLCC  library 
november 2014 by nynate17
Project MUSE - Silent Victims: Hate Crimes against Native Americans
Book review. Silent Victims: Hate Crimes against Native Americans (review) Michelle D. Johnson-Jennings From: The American Indian Quarterly Volume 33, Number 3, Summer 2009 pp. 414-416 | 10.1353/aiq.0.0053 Barbara Perry has uncovered themes that arise from the Native American victims and also left the reader armed with possible concrete steps for change. Perry’s research interviews of nearly three hundred Native Americans from the Southwest Four Corners region, the Great Lakes, and the Northern Plains regions provide unique qualitative insights into the cycle of oppression and the cumulative effects of hate crimes. This book’s purpose is to provide individual accounts while arguing that many hate crimes go unreported. Further, it contends that hate crimes are but one of many systemic practices that justify and maintain subordination of Native peoples, especially during times of activism. This book effectively reaches its objectives by succinctly contextualizing hate crimes."
2810  hate  crimes  native  americans  prejudice  U.S.  history 
november 2014 by nynate17
Project MUSE - Life on the River: The Archaeology of an Ancient Native American Culture (review)
Life on the River summarizes the findings of an excavation project conducted by Far Western Anthropological Research, Inc., at Kum Bay Xerel (Shady Oak Village, CA-SHA-1043) along the banks of the Upper Sacramento River in northern California. The site that the archaeologists and a group of Wintu and professional volunteers unearthed was a precontact and early contact period Wintu village occupied during the early 1800s. Because the site is located on private land, the owner was required to finance excavations, consultations, and burial removal before the land could be developed for residential housing. As required by the Society for California Archaeology and the Shata County Department of Resource Management, Hildebrandt and Dercangelo, in consultation with Wintu elders and cultural monitors, produced a highly readable, concise book about the site, the history of the Wintu and their ancestors, and their Indigenous occupation of this land over ten thousand years.
2810  native  american  ancient  life  lifestyles  villages  archaeology  history 
november 2014 by nynate17
Lacrosse: The Combat of the Spirits
Reminder: log in to this site via SLCC library access or, when asked on JSTOR to login, use your SLCC login. Lacrosse: The Combat of the Spirits Eugene B. McCluney Page 34 of 34-42. American Indian Quarterly > Vol. 1, No. 1, Spring, 1974. Published by: University of Nebraska Press Article DOI: 10.2307/1184202 Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1184202
2810  Lacrosse  Iroquois  native  american  sport  sports 
november 2014 by nynate17
American Indian Quarterly Book Review of: God is Red by Vine Deloria Jr.
This review is from 1974, by Donald E. Worcester. This particular article is given full text on this site. The nice thing about finding sources on the JSTOR site, is like finding a source on EBSCO, you can use their citation link to instantly format the source citation into MLA or other styles. American Indian Quarterly > Vol. 1, No. 1, Spring, 1974, pp. 87-88. http://www.jstor.org.dbprox.slcc.edu/stable/1184202 On the SLCC library site , I'd use the JSTOR Arts & Sciences VII Archive Collection 1974 - 2008 to track down a copy of the full text. https://atoz.ebsco.com/Titles/SearchResults/7800?IsFromAdvancedSearch=True&Find=American+Indian+Quarterly&GetResourcesBy=TitleNameSearch&resourceTypeName=allTitles&resourceType=&SearchType=BeginsWith
2810  native  american  literature  Vine  Deloria  Jr  Indian  Quarterly  AIQ 
november 2014 by nynate17
The Correlation between Societal Attitudes and Those of American Authors in the Depiction of American Indians, 1607-1860
Author(s): Wynette L. Hamilton Source: American Indian Quarterly, Vol. 1, No. 1 (Spring, 1974), pp. 1-26 Published by: University of Nebraska Press Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1184197 Note: I can use this source's location on JSTOR to show how to find it in our SLCC databases via a tutorial. Just use the above stable URL.
English  2810  Native  American  depictions  stereotypes  1600s  1700s  1800s  colonial  history  society  prejudice  racism 
november 2014 by nynate17
Fighting Tuscarora: The Autobiography of Chief Clinton Rickard
Fighting Tuscarora: The Autobiography of Chief Clinton Rickard by Barbara Graymont; Clinton Rickard Review by: Sandra L. Myres American Indian Quarterly, Vol. 1, No. 1 (Spring, 1974), pp. 88-89 Published by: University of Nebraska Press Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1184203 . Accessed: 08/11/2014 15:36 via: http://www.jstor.org.dbprox.slcc.edu/stable/pdfplus/1184203.pdf?acceptTC=true
2810  IROQUOIS  Tuscarora  autobiography  chief  book  review  native  american  literature 
november 2014 by nynate17
SLCC EBSCO Journal A-to-Z listing
This URL goes to the list of SLCC databases which contain the American Indian Quarterly (AIQ). Any of these databases can be used to track down the full text of articles that are only abstracted on the Project MUSE website (http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/american_indian_quarterly/). REMINDER: YOU MUST BE ON CAMPUS OR LOGIN FROM OFF-CAMPUS WITH YOUR SLCC ID (S# AND PIN).
2810  SLCC  EBSCO  JOURNALS  A  TO  Z  research  native  american  literature  academic  scholarly  databases  America  Indian  Quarterly  AIQ 
november 2014 by nynate17
Project MUSE - What’s in a Name?: The 1940s–1950s “Squaw Dress”
What’s in a Name?: The 1940s–1950s “Squaw Dress” Nancy J. Parezo, Angelina R. Jones. From: The American Indian Quarterly Volume 33, Number 3, Summer 2009 pp. 373-404 | 10.1353/aiq.0.0058 In his 2000 essay, “What Is Native Studies,” First Nations scholar Peter Kulchyski wrote that “Native Studies is the setting right of names, the righting of names as much as the writing of names.” "Unfortunately, the righting of names is not as simple a process as Kulchyski posits. While scholars may try to eliminate offensive names, words of conquest, or colonialist adjectives, many problematic names are created by individuals and organizations over which we have little control except societal peer pressure and the general desire of people not to offend. The hardest names to right will be those associated with entrenched representational stereotypes . . . . An example relevant for this article: Native American women seen as either squaws or princesses." SLCC library link: http://web.b.ebscohost.com.
2810  native  american  names  squaws  squaw  racial  slurs  stereotypes  princesses  princess  culture  cultural  borrowing 
november 2014 by nynate17
Senate Confirms First-Ever Native American Woman As Federal Judge
Posted 5/15/2014 from Huffinton Post. WASHINGTON -- The Senate quietly made history on Wednesday night when it confirmed Diane Humetewa as a federal judge -- the first Native American woman to ever hold such a post. Humetewa was confirmed 96-0 to serve on the U.S. District Court for the District of Arizona. She is a former U.S. attorney in Arizona and a member of the Hopi tribe. She is now the first active member of a Native American tribe to serve on the federal bench and only the third Native American in history to do so. Her confirmation elicited a rare moment of bipartisan celebration on Twitter from the White House and Republican senators.
2810  Native  American  Federal  Judge  first  woman  Hopi 
may 2014 by nynate17
Project MUSE - The Soul of Unity: The Quarterly Journal of the Society of American Indians, 1913–1915
"The Society of American Indians (sai ) published the first issue of its Quarterly Journal in 1913. For two years, prior to it being renamed the American Indian Magazine in 1916, editor-general Arthur C. Parker worked tirelessly to establish the Quarterly Journal as an “organ” that would unite Native Americans across tribal and political boundaries. In pursuit of this objective Parker editorialized in 1914 that to “live, any organization dedicated to the regeneration of mankind, to the promulgation of happiness, and the stimulation of usefulness in men must have a soul.”1 Parker urged American Indians to unite and direct their “soul energy,” or the disparate forces that connected “the body and the mind,” to the task of Indian “regeneration,” “happiness,” and “usefulness” in the early twentieth century."
2810  native  American  literature  scholarly  journal  history  Parker  Assimilation  conversion  white  view 
april 2014 by nynate17
Project MUSE - The Indian Health Service and the Sterilization of Native American Women
"Two young women entered an IHS hospital in Montana to undergo appendectomies and received tubal ligations, a form of sterilization, as an added benefit. Bertha Medicine Bull, a member of the Northern Cheyenne tribe, related how the "two girls had been sterilized at age fifteen before they had any children. Both were having appendectomies when the doctors sterilized them without their knowledge or consent." Their parents were not informed either. Two fifteen-year-old girls would never be able to have children of their own. What happened to these three females was a common occurrence during the 1960s and 1970s. Native Americans accused the Indian Health Service of sterilizing at least 25 percent of Native American women who were between the ages of fifteen and forty-four during the 1970s. The allegations included: failure to provide women with necessary information regarding sterilization; use of coercion to get signatures on the consent forms; improper consent forms; and . . . . "
http://eds.b.ebscohost.com.libprox1.slcc.edu/eds/detail/detail?vid=2&sid=590df49d-696a-4abc-bd5c-5021dd1a09fb%40sessionmgr103&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWRzLWxpdmU%3d#AN=edsgcl.72733389&db=edsglr
2810  Indian  Native  American  women  sterilization  IHS  Health  Service  genocide  government  policy 
april 2014 by nynate17
Native American DNA: Tribal Belonging and the False Promise of Genetic Science: Kim TallBear: 9780816665860: Amazon.com: Books
"In Native American DNA, Kim TallBear shows how DNA testing is a powerful—and problematic—scientific process that is useful in determining close biological relatives. But tribal membership is a legal category that has developed in dependence on certain social understandings and historical contexts, a set of concepts that entangles genetic information in a web of family relations, reservation histories, tribal rules, and government regulations. At a larger level, TallBear asserts, the “markers” that are identified and applied to specific groups such as Native American tribes bear the imprints of the cultural, racial, ethnic, national, and even tribal misinterpretations of the humans who study them. TallBear notes that ideas about racial science, which informed white definitions of tribes in the nineteenth century, are unfortunately being revived in twenty-first-century laboratories.
2810  Native  American  DNA  blood  quantum  termination  assimilation  tribal  rolls  politics  science  genetics 
april 2014 by nynate17
Native American and Indigenous Studies — University of Minnesota Press
This site lists links to their own and other sites' publications on Native American cultures, issues and related topics. Excellent variety of examples of those types of publications. Scholarly research as well.
2810  Native  American  literature  publications 
april 2014 by nynate17
Native Americans are Americans, Too | Modern ViewPoint
From March 30, 2014. The ignorance concerning Native American culture and history in this country is inexcusable. I remember being told by a Native American professor in college that her students often assumed Native Americans were “extinct.” We live in an environment that is culturally insensitive, where we think it is socially acceptable to dress up like Native Americans on Halloween, make mock tribal noises, and cheer on sports teams with offensive names like the “Redskins.” We pride ourselves on being a cultural melting pot, yet know very little about our own indigenous people. Our lack of knowledge concerning Native American culture is demonstrated by our treatment of tribal identification cards. Although the federal government recognizes tribal ID’s as legal forms of identification, there is no federal law mandating the equal treatment of tribal identification cards by the states. Some states, such as Montana and South Dakota, have passed laws requiring tribal ID’s to be treated
2810  tribal  ID  history  sovereignty  marginalization  politics  prejudice  American  Indian  Native  American 
april 2014 by nynate17
Denver Public Library Western History/Genealogy Digital Collections
Denver library photos of Native Americans, including some from Wild West show of the time period.
2810  Native  American  American  Indian  photographs  images  Wild  West  show 
march 2014 by nynate17
Browse List of Tribes -Library of Congress
Based on the work of Edward Curtis, photographer and perpetrator of the "vanishing race" idea. On the Library of Congress old site on Curtis's photographs.
2810  map  tribes  Edward  Curtis  photos  Indian  Indians  Native  American 
february 2014 by nynate17
Edward S. Curtis's The North American Indian: Edward S. Curtis in Context
Who was Edward Curtis, and what did he hope to achieve by publishing the twenty volume set, The North American Indian? What was his background, and what were the cultural influences affecting his understanding of the various tribes he sought to document? How was he viewed by his contemporaries in academia, government, and the public? How has the reputation of his work fared in the seventy years since completion of his work? How has he been viewed by Indians then and today? Developed in consultation with an Advisory Board of educators and researchers in American Indian culture, the resources provided in this Special Presentation can help to answer these questions. While consulting online reproductions of the images and captions themselves, the user can look up facts on a Curtis timeline and view a map depicting locations of the various tribal groups when they were photographed by Curtis. Accompanying essays discuss how Curtis worked, what his work has meant to Native peoples of North Am
Curtis  2810  photos  Native  American  Indian  Vanishing  Race  LOC  library  of  congress  history 
february 2014 by nynate17
Sundance Film Festival Classics "Conversion" - YouTube
A 2007 Sundance Film Festival selection showing a traditional Navajo family's little girl who appears caught between 2 religious traditions or beliefs, and finds the Christian tradition attractive. Information from the YouTube site: " Uploaded on Dec 28, 2010 In a remote corner of the Navajo nation, circa 1950, a visit by Christian missionaries has catastrophic consequences for a family." Category The Screening Room Directed by: Nanobah Becker License Standard YouTube License
2810  English  2810  Native  American  Lit  &  Experience  link  conversion  religion  Sundance  film  festival  assimilation  religious 
february 2014 by nynate17
News From Indian Country & IndianCountryTV.com | Facebook
Indian Country's Facebook page, with links to current events or news stories.
2810  media  Indian  country  tv  news  native  issues 
february 2014 by nynate17
Native American mascots challenged in [Seattle] Washington - Indian Country News
By Donna Gordon Blankinship Seattle, Washington (AP) October 2012. "The state Board of Education is making another attempt at encouraging Washington schools to replace their Native American mascots. In the past decade, about 10 schools have given up their Indian mascots. But another 50, including tribal schools, are holding fast to their nicknames as warriors, braves, redskins and red devils. The state board passed a resolution urging districts to stop using Native American mascots, but as board spokesman Aaron Wyatt acknowledges, it does not have the authority to mandate this change. There are no consequences for schools that do not voluntarily choose a new mascot, Wyatt said. Washington’s resolution, which is similar to resolution passed by the board in 1993, was inspired by research by the American Psychological Association citing the adverse effects of Native American mascots on students [and] also mentions the widening achievement gap between Native American and other students."
2810  mascots  schools  education  issues  teams  high  schools  Indian  Native  American  APA  achievement  gap 
february 2014 by nynate17
Native News Update February 7, 2014 - Indian Country News
Indian Country News has links to a variety of issues, including law suits, mascot issues, gaming, tourism, reservation economy, etc. See the drop down tabs for these issues, like the Wisconsin Jan. 2013 story.
2810  native  news  tv  newspaper  American  Indian  American  issues  Indian  Country  gaming  mascot  reservation 
february 2014 by nynate17
Story of Forrest Gerard is a ‘must’ for the Canon of Indian Country - Indian Country News
"The story of Forrest Joseph Gerard is one that ought to be required in any Indian Country canon. He died on December 28, 2013, in Albuquerque." "The next step was more substantial. Turning Richard Nixon’s July 1970 message into legislation. That next step was the Indian Self-Determination and Education Assistance Act, eventually signed into law on April 3, 1974. But the legislative train was running. The self-determination act was followed by the Menominee Restoration Act, the Indian Finance Act, and, what Gerard considered his legislative capstone, the Indian Health Care Improvement Act." "So why should Forrest Gerard’s story be in The Canon? Simply this: He traveled from the Blackfeet Reservation in Montana and built a professional career. He was prepared for that moment in time where he was offered a job with enormous potential, shepherding legislation that not only ended termination as a policy, but promoted tribal self-determination as an alternative [and continues today].
2810  termination  self-determination  American  Indian  native  law  Congress  legislation  1960s  1970s 
february 2014 by nynate17
The Myth of the Noble Savage by Terry Jay Ellingson
Historical examination of the term Noble Savage usage to present day. A source for Exam 1.
English  2810  English  2810  Native  American  Lit  &  Experience  link  noble  savage  savage  literature  ebook  full  text  mascot 
february 2014 by nynate17
Project MUSE - The Indian Health Service and the Sterilization of Native American Women
What happened to these three females was a common occurrence during the 1960s and 1970s. Native Americans accused the Indian Health Service of sterilizing at least 25 percent of Native American women who were between the ages of fifteen and forty-four during the 1970s. The allegations included: failure to provide women with necessary information regarding sterilization; use of coercion to get signatures on the consent forms; improper consent forms; and lack of an appropriate waiting period (at least seventy-two hours) between the signing of a consent form and the surgical procedure. This paper investigates the historical relationship between the IHS and Indian tribes; the right of the United States government to sterilize women; the government regulations pertaining to sterilization; the efforts of the IHS to sterilize American Indian women; physicians' reasons for sterilizing American Indian women; and the consequences the sterilizations had on the lives of a few of those women
2810  sterilization  Native  American  Indian  Women  IHS  Indian  Health  Service 
january 2014 by nynate17
Project MUSE - Plastic Shamans and Astroturf Sun Dances: New Age Commercialization of Native American Spirituality
The American Indian Quarterly Volume 24, Number 3, Summer 2000 pp. 329-352 | 10.1353/aiq.2000.0001 Consuming Native American Spirituality Commercial exploitation of Native American spiritual traditions has permeated the New Age movement since its emergence in the 1980s. Euro-Americans professing to be medicine people have profited from publications and workshops. Mass quantities of products promoted as "Native American sacred objects" have been successfully sold by white entrepreneurs to a largely non-Indian market. This essay begins with an overview of these acts of commercialization as well as Native Americans' objections to such practices. Its real focus, however, is the motivation behind the New Agers' obsession and consumption of Native American spirituality. Why do New Agers persist in consuming commercialized Native American spirituality? -their fetishization of Native American spirituality not only masks the social oppression of real Indian peoples but also perpetuates it.
2810  cultural  appropriation  Native  American  shamans  ceremonies  New  Age 
january 2014 by nynate17
Project MUSE - Indians and Wannabes
Indians and Wannabes Native American Powwow Dancing in the Northeast and Beyond Ann M. Axtmann Publication Year: 2013 Colloquially the term “powwow” refers to a meeting where important matters will be discussed. However, at the thousands of Native American intertribal dances that occur every year throughout the United States and Canada, a powwow means something else altogether. Sometimes lasting up to a week, these social gatherings are a sacred tradition central to Native American spirituality. Attendees dance, drum, sing, eat, re-establish family ties, and make new friends.
book  review  2810  Project  MUSE  pow  wow  dancing  Native  American  Northeast 
january 2014 by nynate17
Project MUSE - From the Tomahawk Chop to the Road Block: Discourses of Savagism in Whitestream Media
From: The American Indian Quarterly Volume 35, Number 1, Winter 2011 pp. 104-134 | 10.1353/aiq.2011.0005 Since early colonial times, Indigenous peoples on Anówarakowa Kawennote—"Great Turtle Island" in Kanienkeha (the Mohawk language)—have been represented via the imaginations of the invading European settler-colonists. Not surprisingly, such typically distorted representations have long been a part of the popular press and news media in the United States and Canada. In 1996 the report of Canada's Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples asserted, "When the media address Aboriginal issues, the impressions they convey are often distorted." In a statement to the Commission, the Canadian Association of Journalists stated: Canada's Aboriginal peoples are, in general, badly served by national and local media. . . . The country's large newspapers, TV and radio news shows often contain misinformation, sweeping generalizations and galling stereotypes about Natives and Native affairs.. . .
2810  racism  sports  mascot  media  images  Native  American  Indians  stereotypes  Canadian  2810  Iroquois  Mohawk  Native  American 
january 2014 by nynate17
Native American and Indigenous Studies (NAIS) — University of Minnesota Press. First issue to be published in Spring 2014. Published twice a year in Spring and Fall.
Journal of the Native American and Indigenous Studies Association. Native American and Indigenous Studies seeks to be the leading forum for scholarship in the local, regional, and global work of this emergent field. As the journal of the Native American and Indigenous Studies Association (founded in North America in 2008), NAIS participates in the process of framing, deploying, and otherwise critically challenging the local and global contours of Indigenous studies. Similar to the way NAISA’s annual meeting has become the premier academic meeting in the field, the editors of NAIS are committed to creating a lively and rigorous space for the publication of the most excellent and pathbreaking scholarship pertinent to Indigenous studies scholars. Editors: Jean M. O’Brien (Ojibwe), professor of history at the University of Minnesota. Robert Warrior (Osage), director of American Indian Studies and professor of American Indian studies, English, and history at the University of Illinois at Ur
2810  Native  American  nativeamerican  academic  journal  research  studies 
january 2014 by nynate17
Wicazo Sa Review Association for American Indian Research — University of Minnesota Press
This is this publication's home page, but not where I'd go to read articles for free. To read for free requires going through SLCC's library links. Otherwise you have to pay for content/downloading. "During the past two decades, Native American Studies has emerged as a central arena in which Native American populations in the United States define the cultural, religious, legal, and historical parameters of scholarship and creativity essential for survival in the modern world. Founded in 1985, Wicazo Sa Review is a journal in support of this particular type of scholarship, providing inquiries into the Indian past and its relationship to the vital present. Its aim is to become an interdisciplinary instrument to assist indigenous peoples of the Americas in taking possession of their own intellectual and creative pursuits."
home  page  2810  English  2810  Native  American  Lit  &  Experience  link  nativeamerican  research  academic  journal  issues 
january 2014 by nynate17
Howie Miller at the Winnipeg Comedy Festival - Native Comedian - YouTube
funny. talks about fast food jobs he's had, riding in cop cars, being "caucasian impaired"
2810  Native  humor  comedy  Indian  Canadian  funny  Howie  Miller 
january 2014 by nynate17
The heart of everything that is : the untold story of Red Cloud, an American legend
Personal Author: Drury, Bob. Title: The heart of everything that is : the untold story of Red Cloud, an American legend / Bob Drury and Tom Clavin. The untold story of the great Oglala Sioux chief Red Cloud, the most powerful Indian commander of the Plains who witnessed the opening of the West and forced the American government to sue for peace in a conflict named for him. Personal subject: Red Cloud, 1822-1909. Subject term: Oglala Indians--Kings and rulers--Biography. Subject term: Red Cloud's War, 1866-1867.
2810  Native  American  leaders  warrior  war  Red  Cloud  SLCC  LIBRARY  REDWOOD  CAMPUS 
january 2014 by nynate17
Native Americans today : a biographical dictionary
Author Johansen, Bruce E. (Bruce Elliott), 1950- Publisher:Greenwood Press,Pub date:c2010.Pages:xxiv, 315 p. :ISBN:9780313355547 Item info: 1 copy available at Redwood Campus Library.
2810  SLCC  NATIVE  AMERICANS  BIOGRAPHICAL  NATIONS  TRIBES  identity  culture 
january 2014 by nynate17
Dancing in Moccasins: : Keeping Native American Traditions Alive
This is a Films on Demand source, accessible online via SLCC LIBRARY ACCESS (on or off campus. If accessing from off-campus, know your S# and pin (last 4 digits of your phone number used to register at SLCC)
English  2810  culture  assimilation  traditions  Native  American  Urban  Indians  pow  wow  dancing  education  two  worlds 
january 2014 by nynate17
American Studies @ The University of Virginia
University of Virginia's archive of Native American hypertext links (the Yellow Pages of such) connecting to historical and contemporary issues.
xroads  virginia  University  of  nativeamerican  links  hypertext  archive  2810  English  history  culture  Native  issues 
october 2012 by nynate17
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