nhaliday + working-stiff   172

Is the keyboard faster than the mouse?
Conclusion

It’s entirely possible that the mysterious studies Tog’s org spent $50M on prove that the mouse is faster than the keyboard for all tasks other than raw text input, but there doesn’t appear to be enough information to tell what the actual studies were. There are many public studies on user input, but I couldn’t find any that are relevant to whether or not I should use the mouse more or less at the margin.

When I look at various tasks myself, the results are mixed, and they’re mixed in the way that most programmers I polled predicted. This result is so boring that it would barely be worth mentioning if not for the large groups of people who believe that either the keyboard is always faster than the mouse or vice versa.

Please let me know if there are relevant studies on this topic that I should read! I’m not familiar with the relevant fields, so it’s possible that I’m searching with the wrong keywords and reading the wrong papers.
techtariat  dan-luu  engineering  programming  productivity  workflow  hci  hardware  working-stiff  benchmarks 
november 2017 by nhaliday
design patterns - What is MVC, really? - Software Engineering Stack Exchange
The model manages fundamental behaviors and data of the application. It can respond to requests for information, respond to instructions to change the state of its information, and even to notify observers in event-driven systems when information changes. This could be a database, or any number of data structures or storage systems. In short, it is the data and data-management of the application.

The view effectively provides the user interface element of the application. It'll render data from the model into a form that is suitable for the user interface.

The controller receives user input and makes calls to model objects and the view to perform appropriate actions.

...

Though this answer has 21 upvotes, I find the sentence "This could be a database, or any number of data structures or storage systems. (tl;dr : it's the data and data-management of the application)" horrible. The model is the pure business/domain logic. And this can and should be so much more than data management of an application. I also differentiate between domain logic and application logic. A controller should not ever contain business/domain logic or talk to a database directly.
q-n-a  stackex  explanation  concept  conceptual-vocab  structure  composition-decomposition  programming  engineering  best-practices  pragmatic  jargon  thinking  metabuch  working-stiff  tech  🖥  checklists 
october 2017 by nhaliday
My Old Boss | West Hunter
Back in those days, there was interest in finding better ways to communicate with a submerged submarine.  One method under consideration used an orbiting laser to send pulses of light over the ocean, using a special wavelength, for which there was a very good detector.  Since even the people running the laser might not know the boomer’s exact location, while weather and such might also interfere,  my old boss was trying to figure out methods of reliably transmitting messages when some pulses were randomly lost – which is of course a well-developed subject,  error-correcting codes. But he didn’t know that.  Hadn’t even heard of it.

Around this time, my old boss was flying from LA to Washington, and started talking with his seatmate about this  submarine communication problem.  His seatmate – Irving S. Reed – politely said that he had done a little work on some similar problems.  During this conversation, my informant, a fellow minion sitting behind my old boss, was doggedly choking back hysterical laughter, not wanting to interrupt this very special conversation.
west-hunter  scitariat  stories  reflection  working-stiff  engineering  dirty-hands  electromag  communication  coding-theory  giants  bits  management  signal-noise 
september 2017 by nhaliday
The Usual Suspect | West Hunter
Once upon a time, I was working at Hughes Aircraft, analyzing missile guidance sensors and trying to design laser weapons.  My fellow engineers thought I had other strengths –  I was a halfway decent pinochle player.  Some thought my abilities ranged further.

For example, my boss – an English optical designer we will call Roger W, quite a sharp guy – once called me into his office to accuse of me of practicing black magic.  Someone had been placing tiny five-pointed stars over his desk and chair for some weeks.  Naturally, he suspected some kind of sorcery, and even more naturally, he suspected me.
west-hunter  scitariat  reflection  stories  working-stiff  engineering  dirty-hands  management 
september 2017 by nhaliday
THE GROWING IMPORTANCE OF SOCIAL SKILLS IN THE LABOR MARKET*
key fact: cognitive ability is not growing in importance, but non-cognitive ability is

The labor market increasingly rewards social skills. Between 1980 and 2012, jobs requiring high levels of social interaction grew by nearly 12 percentage points as a share of the U.S. labor force. Math-intensive but less social jobs—including many STEM occupations—shrank by 3.3 percentage points over the same period. Employment and wage growth was particularly strong for jobs requiring high levels of both math skill and social skill. To understand these patterns, I develop a model of team production where workers “trade tasks” to exploit their comparative advantage. In the model, social skills reduce coordination costs, allowing workers to specialize and work together more efficiently. The model generates predictions about sorting and the relative returns to skill across occupations, which I investigate using data from the NLSY79 and the NLSY97. Using a comparable set of skill measures and covariates across survey waves, I find that the labor market return to social skills was much greater in the 2000s than in the mid 1980s and 1990s. JEL Codes: I20, I24, J01, J23, J24, J31

The Increasing Complementarity between Cognitive and Social Skills: http://econ.ucsb.edu/~weinberg/MathSocialWeinberger.pdf

The Changing Roles of Education and Ability in Wage Determination: http://business.uow.edu.au/content/groups/public/@web/@commerce/@research/documents/doc/uow130116.pdf

Intelligence and socioeconomic success: A meta-analytic review of longitudinal research: http://www.emilkirkegaard.dk/en/wp-content/uploads/Intelligence-and-socioeconomic-success-A-meta-analytic-review-of-longitudinal-research.pdf
Moderator analyses showed that the relationship between intelligence and success is dependent on the age of the sample but there is little evidence of any historical trend in the relationship.

https://twitter.com/khazar_milkers/status/898996206973603840
https://archive.is/7gLXv
that feelio when america has crossed an inflection point and EQ is obviously more important for success in todays society than IQ
I think this is how to understand a lot of "corporate commitment to diversity" stuff.Not the only reason ofc, but reason it's so impregnable
compare: https://pinboard.in/u:nhaliday/b:e9ac3d38e7a1
and: https://pinboard.in/u:nhaliday/b:a38f5756170d

g-reliant skills seem most susceptible to automation: https://fredrikdeboer.com/2017/06/14/g-reliant-skills-seem-most-susceptible-to-automation/

THE ERROR TERM: https://spottedtoad.wordpress.com/2018/02/19/the-error-term/
Imagine an objective function- something you want to maximize or minimize- with both a deterministic and a random component.

...

Part of y is rules-based and rational, part is random and outside rational control. Obviously, the ascent of civilization has, to the extent it has taken place, been based on focusing energies on those parts of the world that are responsive to rational interpretation and control.

But an interesting thing happens once automated processes are able to take over the mapping of patterns onto rules. The portion of the world that is responsive to algorithmic interpretation is also the rational, rules-based portion, almost tautologically. But in terms of our actual objective functions- the real portions of the world that we are trying to affect or influence- subtracting out the portion susceptible to algorithms does not eliminate the variation or make it unimportant. It simply makes it much more purely random rather than only partially so.

The interesting thing, to me, is that economic returns accumulate to the random portion of variation just as to the deterministic portion. In fact, if everybody has access to the same algorithms, the returns may well be largely to the random portion. The efficient market hypothesis in action, more or less.

...

But more generally, as more and more of the society comes under algorithmic control, as various forms of automated intelligence become ubiquitous, the remaining portion, and the portion for which individual workers are rewarded, might well become more irrational, more random, less satisfying, less intelligent.

Golden age for team players: https://news.harvard.edu/gazette/story/2017/10/social-skills-increasingly-valuable-to-employers-harvard-economist-finds/
Strong social skills increasingly valuable to employers, study finds

Number of available jobs by skill set (over time)

Changes in hourly wages by skill set (over time)

https://twitter.com/GarettJones/status/947904725294260224
https://archive.is/EEQA9
A resolution for the new year: Remember that intelligence is a predictor of social intelligence!
pdf  study  economics  econometrics  trends  labor  intelligence  iq  personality  psych-architecture  compensation  human-capital  🎩  data  regularizer  hmm  career  planning  long-term  stylized-facts  management  polarization  stagnation  inequality  leadership  longitudinal  chart  zeitgeist  s-factor  history  mostly-modern  usa  correlation  gnon  🐸  twitter  social  memes(ew)  pic  discussion  diversity  managerial-state  unaffiliated  left-wing  automation  gender  backup  westminster  multi  working-stiff  news  org:edu  time-series  :/  coordination  collaboration  money  medicine  law  teaching  education  tech  dirty-hands  engineering  supply-demand  ratty  large-factor  signal-noise  order-disorder  random  technocracy  branches  unintended-consequences  ai  prediction  speculation  theory-of-mind 
august 2017 by nhaliday
“A state of flow can be achieved by deep work” | Hacker News
When I start my morning, I refused to pick up my phone and check out social media (usually I would take a 45 minute dump just catching up on stuff posted last night). Sure my morning chores became a bit boring, but I also became more efficient (I started getting to work sooner).

Basically, by the time I get to my desk, I am so bored that the most interesting thing I can do is work. And my work (programming) is a very interesting task, it used to keep me engaged for hours and hours, it's just that Social Media defeated it.

https://twitter.com/naval/status/835003743074717700
hn  commentary  techtariat  tech  working-stiff  attention  the-monster  focus  productivity  discipline  self-control  inhibition  multi  twitter  social  barons  emotion 
february 2017 by nhaliday
Information Processing: Boom, Bust, and the Global Race for Scientific Talent
Falling Behind? is a recent (March 2014) book by Michael Teitelbaum of the Sloan Foundation, a demographer and long time critic of STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) shortage claims. Falling Behind? is an excellent book with a wealth of data and information on the history of booms and busts in science and engineering employment since World War II, STEM shortage claims in general, and lobbying for “high-skilled” immigration “reform”. Although I have been a student of these issues for many years, I encountered many facts and insights that I did not know or had not thought of. Nonetheless the book has a number of weakenesses which readers should keep in mind.

... The evidence assembled in this book leads inescapably to three core findings:

o First, that the alarms about widespread shortages or shortfalls in the number of U.S. scientists and engineers are quite inconsistent with nearly all available evidence;

o Second, that similar claims of the past were politically successful but resulted in a series of booms and busts that did harm to the U.S. science and engineering enterprise and made careers in these fields increasingly unattractive; and

o Third, that the clear signs of malaise in the U.S. science and engineering workforce are structural in origin and cannot be cured simply by providing additional funding. To the contrary, recent efforts of this kind have proved to be destabilizing, and advocates should be careful what they wish for. ...

https://blogs.wsj.com/cio/2016/08/12/is-there-a-stem-crisis-or-a-stem-surplus/
- “In the academic job market, there is no noticeable shortage in any discipline. In fact, there are signs of an oversupply of Ph.D.’s vying for tenure-track faculty positions in many disciplines (e.g., biomedical sciences, physical sciences).”
- “In the government and government-related job sector, certain STEM disciplines have a shortage of positions at the Ph.D. level (e.g., materials science engineering, nuclear engineering) and in general (e.g., systems engineers, cybersecurity, and intelligence professionals) due to the U.S. citizenship requirement. In contrast, an oversupply of biomedical engineers is seen at the Ph.D. level, and there are transient shortages of electrical engineers and mechanical engineers at advanced-degree levels.”
- “In the private sector, software developers, petroleum engineers, data scientists, and those in skilled trades are in high demand; there is an abundant supply of biomedical, chemistry, and physics Ph.D.’s; and transient shortages and surpluses of electrical engineers occur from time to time.”

The STEM Crisis is a Myth: An Ongoing Discussion: http://spectrum.ieee.org/static/the-stem-crisis-is-a-myth-an-ongoing-discussion
https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=6305671

STEM: Still No Shortage: https://medium.com/i-m-h-o/stem-still-no-shortage-c6f6eed505c1
- Freddie deBoer
https://www.wsj.com/articles/where-college-seniors-are-falling-short-1493118000

Where the STEM Jobs Are (and Where They Aren’t): https://www.nytimes.com/2017/11/01/education/edlife/stem-jobs-industry-careers.html
The number of graduates with technical majors (shown: bachelor, master and Ph.D. degrees awarded in 2015-16) tends to outpace job openings (shown: 2014-24 projections, annualized). Computer science is the exception.
hsu  scitariat  books  review  science  supply-demand  academia  phd  labor  cycles  quotes  malaise  rot  multi  career  planning  data  trends  macro  economics  org:rec  working-stiff  links  tech  sv  grad-school  compensation  long-term  uncertainty  news  org:sci  progression  wonkish  commentary  hn  hmm  org:med  unaffiliated  left-wing  education  higher-ed  regularizer  arbitrage  innovation  visualization  scale  human-capital 
january 2017 by nhaliday
Overcoming Bias : On the goodness of Beeminder
There is a lot of leeway in what indicators you measure, and some I tried didn’t help much. The main things I measure lately are:

- number of 20 minute blocks of time spent working. They have to be continuous, though a tiny bit of interruption is allowed if someone else causes it
- time spent exercising weighted by the type of exercise e.g. running = 2x dancing = 2 x walking
- points accrued for doing tasks on my to-do list. When I think of anything I want to do I put it on the list, whether it’s watching a certain movie or figuring out how to make the to do list system better. Some things stay there permanently, e.g. laundry. I assign each task a number of points, which goes up every Sunday if it’s still on the list. I have to get 15 points per day or I lose.
ratty  core-rats  hanson  rationality  money-for-time  akrasia  productivity  workflow  webapp  tools  review  software  exocortex  decision-making  working-stiff  the-monster  🦉  beeminder  skeleton  summary  gtd  time-use  quantified-self  procrastination 
january 2017 by nhaliday
Competent Elites - Less Wrong
http://infoproc.blogspot.com/2009/08/creators-and-rulers.html

Cochran: https://pinboard.in/u:nhaliday/b:d8fc1403ad19

How to Become a C.E.O.? The Quickest Path Is a Winding One: https://www.nytimes.com/2016/09/11/upshot/how-to-become-a-ceo-the-quickest-path-is-a-winding-one.html
New evidence shows that a mix of skills, especially technology skills, counts more than simply long experience in one specialty.

What Does a C.E.O. Actually Do?: http://freakonomics.com/podcast/c-e-o-actually/

On empathy: psychopaths, sociopaths and aspies: http://infoproc.blogspot.com/2011/06/on-empathy-psychopaths-sociopaths-and.html
Last week a startup CTO, who didn't know my background, characterized all CEOs as "warm sociopaths" :-) He is at least partly right: many business and political leaders are good at reading other people's thoughts and emotions, but lack genuine concern for their well being. On the other hand, many geeks are very bad at mind reading or emotional perception, yet adhere to a strict moral code.

East Asian sociopaths?: http://infoproc.blogspot.com/2011/06/east-asian-sociopaths.html
Some would assert that CEOs and other people in leadership positions are often warm sociopaths. Interestingly, it is claimed that there is a huge variation between groups in the rate of sociopathy. Perhaps this is related to the under-representation of E. Asians in leadership positions in the West, despite their high educational achievements? (Instead of sociopathy other factors like aggressiveness in interpersonal relationships might play a role.)

THE ILLUSION OF ASIAN SUCCESS: Scant Progress for Minorities in Cracking the Glass Ceiling from 2007–2015: http://c.ymcdn.com/sites/www.ascendleadership.org/resource/resmgr/research/TheIllusionofAsianSuccess.pdf
https://twitter.com/tcjfs/status/924328536177037312
https://archive.is/PiRKX
Asians are not making it into top ranks at tech firms.
EPI = %exec / %professionals
MPI = %managers / %professionals

CEOs really are worth more than they used to be: https://www.adamsmith.org/blog/economics/ceos-really-are-worth-more-than-they-used-to-be
more: https://twitter.com/s8mb/status/762711050437419008
More silliness on executive pay: https://www.adamsmith.org/blog/yes-chief-executives-really-do-matter
ratty  lesswrong  hmm  impro  high-variance  impact  business  rhetoric  reflection  power  optimate  success  big-yud  multi  hsu  scitariat  signal-noise  leadership  humility  elite  entrepreneurialism  s-factor  organizing  stereotypes  iq  personality  discipline  ability-competence  management  class  strategy  career  planning  data  idk  jobs  long-term  tactics  org:rec  empirical  working-stiff  org:data  progression  knowledge  org:lite  brands  economics  labor  industrial-org  study  summary  audio  podcast  interview  albion  econotariat  nl-and-so-can-you  econometrics  natural-experiment  randy-ayndy  links  twitter  social  discussion  wonkish  chart  winner-take-all  trends  inequality  wealth  compensation  article  org:ngo  org:anglo  random  pdf  white-paper  race  demographics  asia  analysis  visualization  time-series  diversity  commentary  gnon  unaffiliated  right-wing  sv  tech  usa  the-west  california  corporation  psychiatry  socs-and-mops  pop-diff  speculation  psychology  morality  cooperate-defect  explanans  n-factor  disease  self-interest  crooked  vampi 
january 2017 by nhaliday
Lessons from a year’s worth of hiring data | Aline Lerner's Blog
- typos and grammatical errors matter more than anything else
[I feel like this is probably broadly applicable to other application processes, in the sense that it's more important than you might guess]
- having attended a top computer science school doesn’t matter
- listing side projects on your resume isn’t as advantageous as expected
- GPA doesn’t seem to matter
career  tech  sv  data  analysis  objektbuch  jobs  🖥  tactics  empirical  recruiting  working-stiff  transitions  progression  interview-prep 
december 2016 by nhaliday
Valuing Alternative Work Arrangements
The great majority of workers are not willing to pay for flexible scheduling relative to a traditional schedule: either the ability to choose the days and times of work or the number of hours they work. However, the average worker is willing to give up 20% of wages to avoid a schedule set by an employer on a week’s notice. This largely represents workers’ aversion to evening and weekend work, not scheduling unpredictability.
economics  study  labor  behavioral-econ  values  field-study  decision-making  working-stiff  compensation  time  money-for-time  time-use  supply-demand  microfoundations 
december 2016 by nhaliday
How to do career planning properly - 80,000 Hours
- A/B/Z plans
- make a list of red flags and commit to reviewing at some point (and at some interval)
advice  strategy  career  planning  80000-hours  long-term  thinking  guide  summary  checklists  rat-pack  tactics  success  working-stiff  flexibility  wire-guided  progression  ratty 
november 2016 by nhaliday
The Workaholic Rich - The Wealth Report - WSJ
http://www.economist.com/news/finance-and-economics/21600989-why-rich-now-have-less-leisure-poor-nice-work-if-you-can-get-out
Figures from the American Time Use Survey, released last year, show that Americans with a bachelor’s degree or above work two hours more each day than those without a high-school diploma. Other research shows that the share of college-educated American men regularly working more than 50 hours a week rose from 24% in 1979 to 28% in 2006, but fell for high-school dropouts. The rich, it seems, are no longer the class of leisure.

https://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2016/09/the-free-time-paradox-in-america/499826/
some stuff on the 'coming apart' as well

https://www.economist.com/news/books-and-arts/21725751-new-book-looks-how-expenditure-has-changed-among-americas-affluent-modern-american
Consumption and Income Inequality in the U.S. Since the 1960s: http://www.nber.org.sci-hub.tw/papers/w23655.pdf
While overall income inequality (as measured by the 90/10 ratio) rose over the past five decades, the rise in overall consumption inequality was small. The patterns for the two measures differ by decade, and they moved in opposite directions after 2006. Income inequality rose in both the top and bottom halves of the distribution, but increases in consumption inequality are only evident in the top half. The differences are also concentrated in single parent families and single individuals. Although changing demographics can account for some of the changes in consumption inequality, they account for little of the changes in income inequality. Consumption smoothing cannot explain the differences between income and consumption at the very bottom, but the declining quality of income data can. Asset price changes likely account for some of the differences between the measures in recent years for the top half of the distribution.
society  class  labor  news  compensation  data  trends  meaningness  long-term  multi  org:rec  optimate  org:biz  working-stiff  org:anglo  time-use  time  human-capital  lived-experience  elite  current-events  wealth  s-factor  temperance  usa  economics  org:mag  virtu  study  inequality  winner-take-all  intricacy  history  mostly-modern  coming-apart  status  🎩  regularizer 
november 2016 by nhaliday
Information Processing: Do advanced education and a challenging career make you smarter?
A: basically, no. don't worry about atrophying.

... the 100 most successful and 100 least successful men in the group, defining success as holding jobs that required their intellectual gifts. The successes, predictably, included professors, scientists, doctors and lawyers. The non-successes included electronics technicians, police, carpenters and pool cleaners, plus a smattering of failed lawyers, doctors and academics. But here's the catch: the successes and non-successes barely differed in average IQ. [All Termites had high childhood IQs as a consequence of the selection process.] The big differences turned out to be in confidence, persistence and early parental encouragement.
iq  career  data  planning  education  summary  long-term  hsu  evidence-based  regularizer  scitariat  working-stiff  biodet  behavioral-gen  progression  flux-stasis  volo-avolo  optimism 
september 2016 by nhaliday
« earlier      
per page:    204080120160

bundles : disciplinegrowthstarstechie

related tags

80000-hours  :/  ability-competence  academia  acmtariat  advice  age-generation  aging  ai  akrasia  albion  allodium  analogy  analysis  aphorism  app  applicability-prereqs  arbitrage  article  ascetic  asia  assortative-mating  attention  audio  automation  aversion  backup  bangbang  barons  beeminder  behavioral-econ  behavioral-gen  benchmarks  best-practices  biases  big-picture  big-yud  biodet  bits  blog  books  bootstraps  bots  bounded-cognition  branches  brands  broad-econ  business  c(pp)  c:***  calculator  california  capital  career  carmack  causation  chart  cheatsheet  checklists  clarity  class  class-warfare  clever-rats  cliometrics  coalitions  cocktail  code-dive  coding-theory  collaboration  coming-apart  commentary  communication  community  comparison  compensation  competition  complex-systems  composition-decomposition  concept  conceptual-vocab  concurrency  confusion  consumerism  context  contracts  contrarianism  cool  cooperate-defect  coordination  core-rats  corporation  correlation  cost-benefit  critique  crooked  crosstab  culture  current-events  cycles  cynicism-idealism  dan-luu  dark-arts  data  data-science  database  debt  debugging  decision-making  degrees-of-freedom  demographics  desktop  devtools  dirty-hands  discipline  discussion  disease  distributed  distribution  diversity  documentation  drugs  dynamic  early-modern  econ-productivity  econometrics  economics  econotariat  education  effect-size  effective-altruism  efficiency  eh  electromag  elite  email  embodied  embodied-cognition  embodied-pack  emotion  empirical  ems  endo-exo  endogenous-exogenous  engineering  entrepreneurialism  epidemiology  ergo  error  essay  europe  evidence-based  exocortex  experiment  expert-experience  explanans  explanation  externalities  feudal  field-study  finance  fitsci  flexibility  fluid  flux-stasis  focus  food  formal-methods  forum  functional  gender  gender-diff  giants  gnon  google  grad-school  graphical-models  graphs  gregory-clark  growth  growth-econ  GT-101  gtd  guide  guilt-shame  gwern  h2o  habit  hanson  hardware  hci  health  hidden-motives  high-variance  higher-ed  history  hmm  hn  housing  howto  hsu  huge-data-the-biggest  human-bean  human-capital  humility  ideas  idk  impact  impro  incentives  industrial-org  industrial-revolution  inequality  info-dynamics  info-econ  info-foraging  inhibition  init  innovation  insight  institutions  insurance  intelligence  internet  intervention  interview  interview-prep  intricacy  investing  ios  iq  iteration-recursion  jargon  javascript  jobs  journos-pundits  jvm  knowledge  labor  large-factor  latex  law  leadership  learning  left-wing  legibility  len:long  len:short  lesswrong  let-me-see  libraries  lifehack  lifestyle  links  list  lived-experience  long-short-run  long-term  longitudinal  low-hanging  macro  malaise  management  managerial-state  map-territory  market-failure  markets  meaningness  measurement  media  medicine  medieval  memes(ew)  meta:science  metabuch  metameta  methodology  metrics  microbiz  microfoundations  midwest  mindful  minimalism  minimum-viable  models  money  money-for-time  morality  mostly-modern  multi  n-factor  natural-experiment  near-far  negotiation  networking  neuro  neurons  news  nibble  nitty-gritty  nl-and-so-can-you  nootropics  notetaking  null-result  nutrition  objective-measure  objektbuch  oly  optimate  optimism  order-disorder  ORFE  org:anglo  org:biz  org:data  org:edu  org:fin  org:gov  org:health  org:junk  org:lite  org:mag  org:mat  org:med  org:nat  org:ngo  org:rec  org:sci  organization  organizing  osx  outcome-risk  p:whenever  papers  paste  pdf  people  personal-assistant  personal-finance  personality  persuasion  pessimism  phalanges  phd  philosophy  pic  planning  plots  pls  plt  podcast  polarization  policy  poll  pop-diff  popsci  power  pragmatic  pre-2013  prediction  preprint  prioritizing  pro-rata  problem-solving  procrastination  productivity  programming  progression  property-rights  protocol  psych-architecture  psychiatry  psychology  public-health  python  q-n-a  qra  quantified-self  quiz  quotes  race  random  randy-ayndy  ranking  rant  rat-pack  rationality  ratty  recommendations  recruiting  reddit  redistribution  reference  reflection  regularizer  regulation  replication  repo  review  rhetoric  rhythm  right-wing  roots  rot  s-factor  s:*  s:***  satire  scale  scaling-tech  scholar  science  scitariat  search  securities  security  self-control  self-interest  sequential  serene  shipping  signal-noise  simulation  skeleton  skunkworks  sleep  sleuthin  slippery-slope  social  social-psych  society  socs-and-mops  software  spearhead  speculation  spock  ssc  stackex  stagnation  stamina  stanford  startups  stats  status  stereotypes  stoic  stories  strategy  stream  stress  structure  study  stylized-facts  success  summary  supply-demand  survey  sv  synthesis  system-design  systems  tactics  taxes  teaching  tech  technocracy  techtariat  temperance  terminal  texas  the-devil  the-great-west-whale  the-monster  the-west  theory-of-mind  things  thinking  time  time-preference  time-series  time-use  tip-of-tongue  todo  tools  top-n  track-record  tradeoffs  transitions  trends  trust  tutorial  twitter  unaffiliated  uncertainty  unintended-consequences  urban  urban-rural  usa  vague  values  vampire-squid  vcs  vgr  virtu  visualization  vitality  volo-avolo  walls  washington  water  wealth  web  webapp  weird-sun  west-hunter  westminster  white-paper  wiki  winner-take-all  wire-guided  within-without  wkfly  woah  wonkish  workflow  working-stiff  world-war  writing  X-not-about-Y  yc  yvain  zeitgeist  🎓  🎩  🐸  🖥  🤖  🦉 

Copy this bookmark:



description:


tags: