nhaliday + time-use   73

How Many Keystrokes Programers Type a Day?
I was quite surprised how low my own figure is. But thinking about it… it makes sense. Even though we sit in front of computer all day, but the actual typing is a small percentage of that. Most of the time, you have to lunch, run errands, browse web, read docs, chat on phone, run to the bathroom. Perhaps only half of your work time is active coding or writing email/docs. Of that duration, perhaps majority of time you are digesting the info on screen.
techtariat  convexity-curvature  measure  keyboard  time  cost-benefit  data  time-use  workflow  efficiency  prioritizing  editors 
5 weeks ago by nhaliday
The Politics of Mate Choice
TABLE 1 Spousal Concordance on 16 Traits Pearson’s r (n)

Church attendance .714 (4950)
W-P Index (28 items) .647 (3984)
Drinking frequency .599 (4984)
Political party support .596 (4547)
Education .498 (4957)
Height .227 (4964)
pdf  study  sociology  anthropology  sex  assortative-mating  correlation  things  phalanges  planning  long-term  human-bean  religion  theos  politics  polisci  ideology  ethanol  time-use  coalitions  education  embodied  integrity  sleep  rhythm  personality  psych-architecture  stress  psychiatry  self-report  extra-introversion  discipline  self-control  patience  data  database  list  top-n  objektbuch  values  habit  time  density  twin-study  longitudinal  tradition  time-preference  life-history  selection  psychology  social-psych  flux-stasis  demographics  frequency 
december 2017 by nhaliday
Is the keyboard faster than the mouse?
Conclusion

It’s entirely possible that the mysterious studies Tog’s org spent $50M on prove that the mouse is faster than the keyboard for all tasks other than raw text input, but there doesn’t appear to be enough information to tell what the actual studies were. There are many public studies on user input, but I couldn’t find any that are relevant to whether or not I should use the mouse more or less at the margin.

When I look at various tasks myself, the results are mixed, and they’re mixed in the way that most programmers I polled predicted. This result is so boring that it would barely be worth mentioning if not for the large groups of people who believe that either the keyboard is always faster than the mouse or vice versa.

Please let me know if there are relevant studies on this topic that I should read! I’m not familiar with the relevant fields, so it’s possible that I’m searching with the wrong keywords and reading the wrong papers.

[ed.: Incidentally it looks like Dan uses Emacs.]
techtariat  dan-luu  engineering  programming  productivity  workflow  hci  hardware  working-stiff  benchmarks  time  time-use  keyboard  ui  ux  editors  critique  debate  meta-analysis  study  summary  commentary  comparison  bangbang 
november 2017 by nhaliday
Reuters Institute Digital News Report 2017
Section 3.2, p. 39 has polarization data
A new way to chart ideological leanings in news media: https://www.axios.com/a-new-way-to-chart-ideological-leanings-in-news-media-2475716743.html
(using Twitter follows)
Exploring the Ideological Nature of Journalists’ Social Networks on Twitter and Associations with News Story Content: https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B8CcT_0LwJ8QVnJMR1QzcGNuTkk/view
Visualizing Political Polarization on Twitter: http://www.theoutgroup.org/
Dear Mainstream Media: Why so liberal?: https://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/erik-wemple/wp/2017/01/27/dear-mainstream-media-why-so-liberal/
Political Leanings of US Journalists vs. the Public in 2002

Topline Results: 2017 Texas Media & Society Survey: https://moody.utexas.edu/sites/default/files/TMASS_2017Topline_final.pdf
https://twitter.com/gelliottmorris/status/915295562123108352
https://archive.is/sE5cg
Some interesting results from a poll about media & polarization that I presented today for @AStraussInst <THREAD>
pdf  news  org:lite  media  database  data  analysis  politics  polarization  poll  values  time-use  world  usa  europe  EU  britain  internet  tv  social  white-paper  org:ngo  org:edu  ideology  multi  visualization  spatial  exploratory  polisci  wonkish  network-structure  twitter  techtariat  ssc  neocons  info-dynamics  project  org:junk  journos-pundits  info-foraging  track-record  objektbuch  chart  commentary  backup  org:rec  distribution  biases  comparison  within-without  input-output  supply-demand 
june 2017 by nhaliday
Reading | West Hunter
Reading speed and comprehension interest me, but I don’t have as much information as I would like.  I would like to see the distribution of reading speeds ( in the general population, and also in college graduates).  I have looked a bit at discussions of this, and there’s something wrong.  Or maybe a lot wrong.  Researchers apparently say that nobody reads 900 words a minute with full comprehension, but I’ve seen it done.  I would also like to know if anyone has statistically validated methods that  increase reading speed.

On related topics, I wonder how many serious readers  there are, here and also in other countries.  Are they as common in Japan or China, with their very different scripts?   Are reading speeds higher or lower there?

How many people have  their houses really, truly stuffed with books?  Here and elsewhere?  Last time I checked we had about 5000 books around the house: I figure that’s serious, verging on the pathological.

To what extent do people remember what they read?  Judging from the general results of  adult knowledge studies, not very much of what they took in school, but maybe voluntary reading is different.

https://westhunt.wordpress.com/2012/06/05/reading/#comment-3187
The researchers claim that the range of high-comprehension reading speed doesn’t go up anywhere near 900 wpm. But my daughter routinely reads at that speed. In high school, I took a reading speed test and scored a bit over 1000 wpm, with perfect comprehension.

I have suggested that the key to high reading speed is the experience of trying to finish a entire science fiction paperback in a drugstore before the proprietor tells you to buy the damn thing or get out. Helps if you can hide behind the bookrack.

https://westhunt.wordpress.com/2019/03/31/early-reading/
There are a few small children, mostly girls, that learn to read very early. You read stories to them and before you know they’re reading by themselves. By very early, I men age 3 or 4.

Does this happen in China ?

hmm:
Beijingers' average daily reading time exceeds an hour: report: http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/a/201712/07/WS5a293e1aa310fcb6fafd44c0.html

Free Speed Reading Test by AceReader: http://www.freereadingtest.com/
time+comprehension

http://www.readingsoft.com/
claims: 1000 wpm with 85% comprehension at top 1%, 200 wpm at 60% for average

https://www.wsj.com/articles/speed-reading-returns-1395874723
http://projects.wsj.com/speedread/

https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=929753
Take a look at "Reading Rate: A Review of Research and Theory" by Ronald P. Carver
http://www.amazon.com/Reading-Rate-Review-Research-Theory/dp...
The conclusion is, basically, that speed reading courses don't work.
You can teach people to skim at a faster rate than they'd read with maximum comprehension and retention. And you can teach people study skills, such as how to summarize salient points, and take notes.
But all these skills are not at all the same as what speed reading usually promises, which is to drastically increase the rate at which you read with full comprehension and retention. According to Carver's book, it can't be done, at least not drastically past about the rate you'd naturally read at the college level.
west-hunter  scitariat  discussion  speculation  ideas  rant  critique  learning  studying  westminster  error  realness  language  japan  china  asia  sinosphere  retention  foreign-lang  info-foraging  scale  speed  innovation  explanans  creative  multi  data  urban-rural  time  time-use  europe  the-great-west-whale  occident  orient  people  track-record  trivia  books  number  knowledge  poll  descriptive  distribution  tools  quiz  neurons  anglo  hn  poast  news  org:rec  metrics  density  writing  meta:reading 
june 2017 by nhaliday
Overcoming Bias : On the goodness of Beeminder
There is a lot of leeway in what indicators you measure, and some I tried didn’t help much. The main things I measure lately are:

- number of 20 minute blocks of time spent working. They have to be continuous, though a tiny bit of interruption is allowed if someone else causes it
- time spent exercising weighted by the type of exercise e.g. running = 2x dancing = 2 x walking
- points accrued for doing tasks on my to-do list. When I think of anything I want to do I put it on the list, whether it’s watching a certain movie or figuring out how to make the to do list system better. Some things stay there permanently, e.g. laundry. I assign each task a number of points, which goes up every Sunday if it’s still on the list. I have to get 15 points per day or I lose.
ratty  core-rats  hanson  rationality  money-for-time  akrasia  productivity  workflow  webapp  tools  review  software  exocortex  decision-making  working-stiff  the-monster  🦉  beeminder  skeleton  summary  gtd  time-use  quantified-self  procrastination 
january 2017 by nhaliday
Thought Patterns: Marginal · Alex Guzey
Problem: you have a certain action you want to be doing but when the moment comes you forget about it or the trigger just never fully comes to your attention.

Example: Instead of postponing small tasks (e.g. taking out the trash) I want to do them immediately, but when they actually come, I forget about this intention and continue with whatever I was doing before i.e. telling myself I’ll do them later.

How to solve? Make these if-else action plans to always be somewhere at the back of the mind, preferably not far from the working memory, always on the edge of awareness.

Solution: Anki deck with the maximum card interval of 1 day and long initial learning curve.
ratty  advice  lifehack  rationality  akrasia  hmm  discipline  neurons  habit  workflow  🦉  wire-guided  skeleton  gtd  time-use  s:*  metabuch 
december 2016 by nhaliday
Valuing Alternative Work Arrangements
The great majority of workers are not willing to pay for flexible scheduling relative to a traditional schedule: either the ability to choose the days and times of work or the number of hours they work. However, the average worker is willing to give up 20% of wages to avoid a schedule set by an employer on a week’s notice. This largely represents workers’ aversion to evening and weekend work, not scheduling unpredictability.
economics  study  labor  behavioral-econ  values  field-study  decision-making  working-stiff  compensation  time  money-for-time  time-use  supply-demand  microfoundations 
december 2016 by nhaliday
The Workaholic Rich - The Wealth Report - WSJ
http://www.economist.com/news/finance-and-economics/21600989-why-rich-now-have-less-leisure-poor-nice-work-if-you-can-get-out
Figures from the American Time Use Survey, released last year, show that Americans with a bachelor’s degree or above work two hours more each day than those without a high-school diploma. Other research shows that the share of college-educated American men regularly working more than 50 hours a week rose from 24% in 1979 to 28% in 2006, but fell for high-school dropouts. The rich, it seems, are no longer the class of leisure.

https://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2016/09/the-free-time-paradox-in-america/499826/
some stuff on the 'coming apart' as well

https://www.economist.com/news/books-and-arts/21725751-new-book-looks-how-expenditure-has-changed-among-americas-affluent-modern-american
Consumption and Income Inequality in the U.S. Since the 1960s: http://www.nber.org.sci-hub.tw/papers/w23655.pdf
While overall income inequality (as measured by the 90/10 ratio) rose over the past five decades, the rise in overall consumption inequality was small. The patterns for the two measures differ by decade, and they moved in opposite directions after 2006. Income inequality rose in both the top and bottom halves of the distribution, but increases in consumption inequality are only evident in the top half. The differences are also concentrated in single parent families and single individuals. Although changing demographics can account for some of the changes in consumption inequality, they account for little of the changes in income inequality. Consumption smoothing cannot explain the differences between income and consumption at the very bottom, but the declining quality of income data can. Asset price changes likely account for some of the differences between the measures in recent years for the top half of the distribution.
society  class  labor  news  compensation  data  trends  meaningness  long-term  multi  org:rec  optimate  org:biz  working-stiff  org:anglo  time-use  time  human-capital  lived-experience  elite  current-events  wealth  s-factor  temperance  usa  economics  org:mag  virtu  study  inequality  winner-take-all  intricacy  history  mostly-modern  coming-apart  status  🎩  regularizer 
november 2016 by nhaliday
On Refusing to Read - The Chronicle of Higher Education
The activity of nonreading is something that scholars rarely discuss. When they — or others whose identities are bound up with books — do so, the discussions tend to have a shamefaced quality. Blame "cultural capital" — the sense of superiority associated with laying claim to books that mark one’s high social status. More entertainingly, blame Humiliation, the delicious game that a diabolical English professor invents in David Lodge’s 1975 academic satire, Changing Places. In a game of Humiliation, players win points for not having read canonical books that everyone else in the game has read. One hapless junior faculty member in the novel wins a departmental round but loses his tenure case. In real life, the game has been most happily played by the tenured professor secure in his reputation. Changing Places had apparently inspired my adviser’s confession to someone at some point, and the information then wound through the gossip mill to reach me, standing around in the mid-1990s with a beer, trying to hide my own growing list of unread books.

Consider, however, the fact that, as Matthew Wilkens points out, in 2011 more than 50,000 new novels were published in the United States alone. "The problem of abundance" is a problem for every person who has an internet connection, and it is a professional problem in every corner of literary study. Nonreading, seen in this light, is not a badge of shame, but the way of the future. Franco Moretti has been making this point for years about the literary production of the 18th and 19th centuries, inspiring a few labs-worth of scholars to turn to machine reading — for example, using algorithms to find patterns in a particular era’s literary works. This is a form of not reading that holds tight to the dream that our literary scholarship should be based on the activity of reading as much as humanly or inhumanly possible.
academia  literature  learning  attention  contrarianism  essay  rhetoric  len:long  org:mag  org:edu  minimalism  news  signal-noise  serene  culture  time-use  inhibition  info-foraging  prioritizing  explore-exploit 
september 2016 by nhaliday
Why Constant Learners All Embrace the 5-Hour Rule – The Mission – Medium
better than the title suggests, eg, Ben Franklins personal routine looks a lot like what I arrived at independently
growth  akrasia  advice  vulgar  habit  org:med  productivity  learning  creative  wire-guided  practice  time-use  studying 
august 2016 by nhaliday
orthonormal comments on Where to Intervene in a Human? - Less Wrong
The highest-level hack I've found useful is to make a habit of noticing and recording the details of any part of my life that gives me trouble. It's amazing how quickly patterns start to jump out when you've assembled actual data about something that's vaguely frustrated you for a while.
lifehack  productivity  workflow  rationality  advice  akrasia  quantified-self  growth  habit  discipline  lesswrong  ratty  rat-pack  biases  decision-making  🦉  wire-guided  time-use  s:null 
july 2016 by nhaliday
Getting (Unremarkable) Things Done: The Problem With David Allen’s Universalism - Study Hacks - Cal Newport
As a graduate student, I didn’t need better lists of next actions. I needed instead to be training my ability to focus hard on meaningful things for long periods of time — even after it becomes uncomfortable.

It’s here that Allen apologists might try to force these two worlds together. They might suggest, for example, that you could simply have a next action labeled: “spend many hours obsessively doing deep work on problem X.” But such efforts soon reveal their inadequacy.

Deep work is fundamentally different than the shallow (though still important) work of keeping on top of the little things required to function personally and professionally.

At least, this is the compromise I’ve adopted. I embrace GTD for organizing shallow work. It is, as many will attest, devastatingly effective for this purpose. But I think of deep work as something different altogether. A philosophy of life that requires its own strategies.
advice  productivity  workflow  critique  hmm  gtd  aversion  attention  time-use  focus 
june 2016 by nhaliday

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