nhaliday + strings   37

Two Performance Aesthetics: Never Miss a Frame and Do Almost Nothing - Tristan Hume
I’ve noticed when I think about performance nowadays that I think in terms of two different aesthetics. One aesthetic, which I’ll call Never Miss a Frame, comes from the world of game development and is focused on writing code that has good worst case performance by making good use of the hardware. The other aesthetic, which I’ll call Do Almost Nothing comes from a more academic world and is focused on algorithmically minimizing the work that needs to be done to the extent that there’s barely any work left, paying attention to the performance at all scales.

[ed.: Neither of these exactly matches TCS performance PoV but latter is closer (the focus on diffs is kinda weird).]

...

Never Miss a Frame

In game development the most important performance criteria is that your game doesn’t miss frame deadlines. You have a target frame rate and if you miss the deadline for the screen to draw a new frame your users will notice the jank. This leads to focusing on the worst case scenario and often having fixed maximum limits for various quantities. This property can also be important in areas other than game development, like other graphical applications, real-time audio, safety-critical systems and many embedded systems. A similar dynamic occurs in distributed systems where one server needs to query 100 others and combine the results, you’ll wait for the slowest of the 100 every time so speeding up some of them doesn’t make the query faster, and queries occasionally taking longer (e.g because of garbage collection) will impact almost every request!

...

In this kind of domain you’ll often run into situations where in the worst case you can’t avoid processing a huge number of things. This means you need to focus your effort on making the best use of the hardware by writing code at a low level and paying attention to properties like cache size and memory bandwidth.

Projects with inviolable deadlines need to adjust different factors than speed if the code runs too slow. For example a game might decrease the size of a level or use a more efficient but less pretty rendering technique.

Aesthetically: Data should be tightly packed, fixed size, and linear. Transcoding data to and from different formats is wasteful. Strings and their variable lengths and inefficient operations must be avoided. Only use tools that allow you to work at a low level, even if they’re annoying, because that’s the only way you can avoid piles of fixed costs making everything slow. Understand the machine and what your code does to it.

Personally I identify this aesthetic most with Jonathan Blow. He has a very strong personality and I’ve watched enough of videos of him that I find imagining “What would Jonathan Blow say?” as a good way to tap into this aesthetic. My favourite articles about designs following this aesthetic are on the Our Machinery Blog.

...

Do Almost Nothing

Sometimes, it’s important to be as fast as you can in all cases and not just orient around one deadline. The most common case is when you simply have to do something that’s going to take an amount of time noticeable to a human, and if you can make that time shorter in some situations that’s great. Alternatively each operation could be fast but you may run a server that runs tons of them and you’ll save on server costs if you can decrease the load of some requests. Another important case is when you care about power use, for example your text editor not rapidly draining a laptop’s battery, in this case you want to do the least work you possibly can.

A key technique for this approach is to never recompute something from scratch when it’s possible to re-use or patch an old result. This often involves caching: keeping a store of recent results in case the same computation is requested again.

The ultimate realization of this aesthetic is for the entire system to deal only in differences between the new state and the previous state, updating data structures with only the newly needed data and discarding data that’s no longer needed. This way each part of the system does almost no work because ideally the difference from the previous state is very small.

Aesthetically: Data must be in whatever structure scales best for the way it is accessed, lots of trees and hash maps. Computations are graphs of inputs and results so we can use all our favourite graph algorithms to optimize them! Designing optimal systems is hard so you should use whatever tools you can to make it easier, any fixed cost they incur will be made negligible when you optimize away all the work they need to do.

Personally I identify this aesthetic most with my friend Raph Levien and his articles about the design of the Xi text editor, although Raph also appreciates the other aesthetic and taps into it himself sometimes.

...

_I’m conflating the axes of deadline-oriented vs time-oriented and low-level vs algorithmic optimization, but part of my point is that while they are different, I think these axes are highly correlated._

...

Text Editors

Sublime Text is a text editor that mostly follows the Never Miss a Frame approach. ...

The Xi Editor is designed to solve this problem by being designed from the ground up to grapple with the fact that some operations, especially those interacting with slow compilers written by other people, can’t be made instantaneous. It does this using a fancy asynchronous plugin model and lots of fancy data structures.
...

...

Compilers

Jonathan Blow’s Jai compiler is clearly designed with the Never Miss a Frame aesthetic. It’s written to be extremely fast at every level, and the language doesn’t have any features that necessarily lead to slow compiles. The LLVM backend wasn’t fast enough to hit his performance goals so he wrote an alternative backend that directly writes x86 code to a buffer without doing any optimizations. Jai compiles something like 100,000 lines of code per second. Designing both the language and compiler to not do anything slow lead to clean build performance 10-100x faster than other commonly-used compilers. Jai is so fast that its clean builds are faster than most compilers incremental builds on common project sizes, due to limitations in how incremental the other compilers are.

However, Jai’s compiler is still O(n) in the codebase size where incremental compilers can be O(n) in the size of the change. Some compilers like the work-in-progress rust-analyzer and I think also Roslyn for C# take a different approach and focus incredibly hard on making everything fully incremental. For small changes (the common case) this can let them beat Jai and respond in milliseconds on arbitrarily large projects, even if they’re slower on clean builds.

Conclusion
I find both of these aesthetics appealing, but I also think there’s real trade-offs that incentivize leaning one way or the other for a given project. I think people having different performance aesthetics, often because one aesthetic really is better suited for their domain, is the source of a lot of online arguments about making fast systems. The different aesthetics also require different bases of knowledge to pursue, like knowledge of data-oriented programming in C++ vs knowledge of abstractions for incrementality like Adapton, so different people may find that one approach seems way easier and better for them than the other.

I try to choose how to dedicate my effort to pursuing each aesthetics on a per project basis by trying to predict how effort in each direction would help. Some projects I know if I code it efficiently it will always hit the performance deadline, others I know a way to drastically cut down on work by investing time in algorithmic design, some projects need a mix of both. Personally I find it helpful to think of different programmers where I have a good sense of their aesthetic and ask myself how they’d solve the problem. One reason I like Rust is that it can do both low-level optimization and also has a good ecosystem and type system for algorithmic optimization, so I can more easily mix approaches in one project. In the end the best approach to follow depends not only on the task, but your skills or the skills of the team working on it, as well as how much time you have to work towards an ambitious design that may take longer for a better result.
techtariat  reflection  things  comparison  lens  programming  engineering  cracker-prog  carmack  games  performance  big-picture  system-design  constraint-satisfaction  metrics  telos-atelos  distributed  incentives  concurrency  cost-benefit  tradeoffs  systems  metal-to-virtual  latency-throughput  abstraction  marginal  caching  editors  strings  ideas  ui  common-case  examples  applications  flux-stasis  nitty-gritty  ends-means  thinking  summary  correlation  degrees-of-freedom  c(pp)  rust  interface  integration-extension  aesthetics  interface-compatibility  efficiency  adversarial 
9 weeks ago by nhaliday
Anti-hash test. - Codeforces
- Thue-Morse sequence
- nice paper: http://www.mii.lt/olympiads_in_informatics/pdf/INFOL119.pdf
In general, polynomial string hashing is a useful technique in construction of efficient string algorithms. One simply needs to remember to carefully select the modulus M and the variable of the polynomial p depending on the application. A good rule of thumb is to pick both values as prime numbers with M as large as possible so that no integer overflow occurs and p being at least the size of the alphabet.
2.2. Upper Bound on M
[stuff about 32- and 64-bit integers]
2.3. Lower Bound on M
On the other side Mis bounded due to the well-known birthday paradox: if we consider a collection of m keys with m ≥ 1.2√M then the chance of a collision to occur within this collection is at least 50% (assuming that the distribution of fingerprints is close to uniform on the set of all strings). Thus if the birthday paradox applies then one needs to choose M=ω(m^2)to have a fair chance to avoid a collision. However, one should note that not always the birthday paradox applies. As a benchmark consider the following two problems.

I generally prefer to use Schwartz-Zippel to reason about collision probabilities w/ this kind of thing, eg, https://people.eecs.berkeley.edu/~sinclair/cs271/n3.pdf.

A good way to get more accurate results: just use multiple primes and the Chinese remainder theorem to get as large an M as you need w/o going beyond 64-bit arithmetic.

more on this: https://codeforces.com/blog/entry/60442
oly  oly-programming  gotchas  howto  hashing  algorithms  strings  random  best-practices  counterexample  multi  pdf  papers  nibble  examples  fields  polynomials  lecture-notes  yoga  probability  estimate  magnitude  hacker  adversarial  CAS  lattice  discrete 
august 2019 by nhaliday
Karol Kuczmarski's Blog – A Haskell retrospective
Even in this hypothetical scenario, I posit that the value proposition of Haskell would still be a tough sell.

There is this old quote from Bjarne Stroustrup (creator of C++) where he says that programming languages divide into those everyone complains about, and those that no one uses.
The first group consists of old, established technologies that managed to accrue significant complexity debt through years and decades of evolution. All the while, they’ve been adapting to the constantly shifting perspectives on what are the best industry practices. Traces of those adaptations can still be found today, sticking out like a leftover appendix or residual tail bone — or like the built-in support for XML in Java.

Languages that “no one uses”, on the other hand, haven’t yet passed the industry threshold of sufficient maturity and stability. Their ecosystems are still cutting edge, and their future is uncertain, but they sometimes champion some really compelling paradigm shifts. As long as you can bear with things that are rough around the edges, you can take advantage of their novel ideas.

Unfortunately for Haskell, it manages to combine the worst parts of both of these worlds.

On one hand, it is a surprisingly old language, clocking more than two decades of fruitful research around many innovative concepts. Yet on the other hand, it bears the signs of a fresh new technology, with relatively few production-grade libraries, scarce coverage of some domains (e.g. GUI programming), and not too many stories of commercial successes.

There are many ways to do it
String theory
Errors and how to handle them
Implicit is better than explicit
Leaky modules
Namespaces are apparently a bad idea
Wild records
Purity beats practicality
techtariat  reflection  functional  haskell  programming  pls  realness  facebook  pragmatic  cost-benefit  legacy  libraries  types  intricacy  engineering  tradeoffs  frontier  homo-hetero  duplication  strings  composition-decomposition  nitty-gritty  error  error-handling  coupling-cohesion  critique  ecosystem  c(pp)  aphorism 
august 2019 by nhaliday
The Law of Leaky Abstractions – Joel on Software
[TCP/IP example]

All non-trivial abstractions, to some degree, are leaky.

...

- Something as simple as iterating over a large two-dimensional array can have radically different performance if you do it horizontally rather than vertically, depending on the “grain of the wood” — one direction may result in vastly more page faults than the other direction, and page faults are slow. Even assembly programmers are supposed to be allowed to pretend that they have a big flat address space, but virtual memory means it’s really just an abstraction, which leaks when there’s a page fault and certain memory fetches take way more nanoseconds than other memory fetches.

- The SQL language is meant to abstract away the procedural steps that are needed to query a database, instead allowing you to define merely what you want and let the database figure out the procedural steps to query it. But in some cases, certain SQL queries are thousands of times slower than other logically equivalent queries. A famous example of this is that some SQL servers are dramatically faster if you specify “where a=b and b=c and a=c” than if you only specify “where a=b and b=c” even though the result set is the same. You’re not supposed to have to care about the procedure, only the specification. But sometimes the abstraction leaks and causes horrible performance and you have to break out the query plan analyzer and study what it did wrong, and figure out how to make your query run faster.

...

- C++ string classes are supposed to let you pretend that strings are first-class data. They try to abstract away the fact that strings are hard and let you act as if they were as easy as integers. Almost all C++ string classes overload the + operator so you can write s + “bar” to concatenate. But you know what? No matter how hard they try, there is no C++ string class on Earth that will let you type “foo” + “bar”, because string literals in C++ are always char*’s, never strings. The abstraction has sprung a leak that the language doesn’t let you plug. (Amusingly, the history of the evolution of C++ over time can be described as a history of trying to plug the leaks in the string abstraction. Why they couldn’t just add a native string class to the language itself eludes me at the moment.)

- And you can’t drive as fast when it’s raining, even though your car has windshield wipers and headlights and a roof and a heater, all of which protect you from caring about the fact that it’s raining (they abstract away the weather), but lo, you have to worry about hydroplaning (or aquaplaning in England) and sometimes the rain is so strong you can’t see very far ahead so you go slower in the rain, because the weather can never be completely abstracted away, because of the law of leaky abstractions.

One reason the law of leaky abstractions is problematic is that it means that abstractions do not really simplify our lives as much as they were meant to. When I’m training someone to be a C++ programmer, it would be nice if I never had to teach them about char*’s and pointer arithmetic. It would be nice if I could go straight to STL strings. But one day they’ll write the code “foo” + “bar”, and truly bizarre things will happen, and then I’ll have to stop and teach them all about char*’s anyway.

...

The law of leaky abstractions means that whenever somebody comes up with a wizzy new code-generation tool that is supposed to make us all ever-so-efficient, you hear a lot of people saying “learn how to do it manually first, then use the wizzy tool to save time.” Code generation tools which pretend to abstract out something, like all abstractions, leak, and the only way to deal with the leaks competently is to learn about how the abstractions work and what they are abstracting. So the abstractions save us time working, but they don’t save us time learning.
techtariat  org:com  working-stiff  essay  programming  cs  software  abstraction  worrydream  thinking  intricacy  degrees-of-freedom  networking  examples  traces  no-go  volo-avolo  tradeoffs  c(pp)  pls  strings  dbs  transportation  driving  analogy  aphorism  learning  paradox  systems  elegance  nitty-gritty  concrete  cracker-prog  metal-to-virtual  protocol-metadata  design  system-design 
july 2019 by nhaliday
linux - How do I insert a tab character in Iterm? - Stack Overflow
However, this isn't an iTerm thing, this is your shell that's doing it.

ctrl-V for inserting nonprintable literals doesn't work in fish, neither in vi mode nor emacs mode. prob easiest to just switch to bash.
q-n-a  stackex  terminal  yak-shaving  gotchas  keyboard  tip-of-tongue  strings 
june 2019 by nhaliday
Regex cheatsheet
Many programs use regular expression to find & replace text. However, they tend to come with their own different flavor.

You can probably expect most modern software and programming languages to be using some variation of the Perl flavor, "PCRE"; however command-line tools (grep, less, ...) will often use the POSIX flavor (sometimes with an extended variant, e.g. egrep or sed -r). ViM also comes with its own syntax (a superset of what Vi accepts).

This cheatsheet lists the respective syntax of each flavor, and the software that uses it.

accidental complexity galore
techtariat  reference  cheatsheet  documentation  howto  yak-shaving  editors  strings  syntax  examples  crosstab  objektbuch  python  comparison  gotchas  tip-of-tongue  automata-languages  pls  trivia  properties  libraries  nitty-gritty  intricacy  degrees-of-freedom  DSL  programming 
june 2019 by nhaliday
parsing - lexers vs parsers - Stack Overflow
Yes, they are very different in theory, and in implementation.

Lexers are used to recognize "words" that make up language elements, because the structure of such words is generally simple. Regular expressions are extremely good at handling this simpler structure, and there are very high-performance regular-expression matching engines used to implement lexers.

Parsers are used to recognize "structure" of a language phrases. Such structure is generally far beyond what "regular expressions" can recognize, so one needs "context sensitive" parsers to extract such structure. Context-sensitive parsers are hard to build, so the engineering compromise is to use "context-free" grammars and add hacks to the parsers ("symbol tables", etc.) to handle the context-sensitive part.

Neither lexing nor parsing technology is likely to go away soon.

They may be unified by deciding to use "parsing" technology to recognize "words", as is currently explored by so-called scannerless GLR parsers. That has a runtime cost, as you are applying more general machinery to what is often a problem that doesn't need it, and usually you pay for that in overhead. Where you have lots of free cycles, that overhead may not matter. If you process a lot of text, then the overhead does matter and classical regular expression parsers will continue to be used.
q-n-a  stackex  programming  compilers  explanation  comparison  jargon  strings  syntax  lexical  automata-languages 
november 2017 by nhaliday
Strings, periods, and borders
A border of x is any proper prefix of x that equals a suffix of x.

...overlapping borders of a string imply that the string is periodic...

In the border array ß[1..n] of x, entry ß[i] is the length
of the longest border of x[1..i].
pdf  nibble  slides  lectures  algorithms  strings  exposition  yoga  atoms  levers  tidbits  sequential  backup 
may 2017 by nhaliday
Main Page - Competitive Programming Algorithms: E-Maxx Algorithms in English
original russian version: http://e-maxx.ru/algo/

some notable stuff:
- O(N) factorization sieve
- discrete logarithm
- factorial N! (mod P) in O(P log N)
- flow algorithms
- enumerating submasks
- bridges, articulation points
- Ukkonen algorithm
- sqrt(N) trick, eg, for range mode query
explanation  programming  algorithms  russia  foreign-lang  oly  oly-programming  problem-solving  accretion  math.NT  graphs  graph-theory  optimization  data-structures  yoga  tidbits  multi  anglo  language  arrows  strings 
february 2017 by nhaliday

bundles : engtechie

related tags

abstraction  accretion  advanced  adversarial  aesthetics  ai  algorithms  allodium  amortization-potential  analogy  analysis  anglo  announcement  aphorism  applicability-prereqs  applications  arrows  assembly  atoms  automata-languages  backup  barons  benchmarks  best-practices  big-picture  bitcoin  blockchain  bots  c(pp)  caching  calculator  carmack  CAS  cheatsheet  checking  commentary  common-case  comparison  compilers  complexity  composition-decomposition  computation  computer-memory  computer-vision  concrete  concurrency  constraint-satisfaction  correlation  cost-benefit  counterexample  coupling-cohesion  course  cracker-prog  critique  crosstab  cryptocurrency  cs  data-science  data-structures  dbs  debate  debugging  deep-learning  degrees-of-freedom  design  devtools  direction  discrete  distributed  divide-and-conquer  documentation  dotnet  driving  DSL  duplication  dynamic  ecosystem  editors  efficiency  egalitarianism-hierarchy  elegance  embeddings  ends-means  engineering  erik-demaine  error  error-handling  essay  estimate  examples  explanation  exposition  facebook  features  fields  flux-stasis  foreign-lang  form-design  formal-methods  frameworks  frontend  frontier  functional  games  geometry  gnu  golang  google  gotchas  graph-theory  graphics  graphs  grokkability  grokkability-clarity  guide  hacker  hardness  hashing  haskell  heavyweights  hi-order-bits  hn  homo-hetero  howto  huge-data-the-biggest  ideas  impetus  incentives  init  integration-extension  interface  interface-compatibility  internet  intersection  intersection-connectedness  interview-prep  intricacy  invariance  iteration-recursion  jargon  javascript  jvm  keyboard  language  latency-throughput  lattice  learning  lecture-notes  lectures  legacy  lens  levers  lexical  libraries  links  lisp  list  lower-bounds  magnitude  marginal  math  math.CO  math.NT  measure  mechanics  metal-to-virtual  metric-space  metrics  mihai  minimum-viable  mit  mobile  move-fast-(and-break-things)  multi  networking  news  nibble  nitty-gritty  nlp  no-go  nostalgia  objektbuch  ocaml-sml  oly  oly-programming  oop  optimization  orders  org:com  org:inst  org:junk  org:mag  org:med  org:sci  os  p2p  p:someday  papers  paradox  parsimony  paste  path-dependence  pdf  performance  physics  pic  plan9  pls  plt  polynomials  popsci  practice  pragmatic  probability  problem-solving  programming  project  properties  protocol-metadata  puzzles  python  q-n-a  qra  quixotic  quotes  random  realness  rec-math  reddit  reduction  reference  reflection  repo  rhetoric  roadmap  roots  rsc  russia  rust  sci-comp  search  security  sequential  SIGGRAPH  similarity  simulation  slides  social  software  space-complexity  stackex  state  strings  structure  sub-super  summary  summer-2014  syntax  synthesis  system-design  systems  tcs  tcstariat  techtariat  telos-atelos  terminal  theory-practice  things  thinking  tidbits  time  time-complexity  tip-of-tongue  toolkit  tools  topics  traces  tradeoffs  transportation  trees  tricks  trivia  turing  tutorial  types  ubiquity  ui  uniqueness  unit  unix  video  virtualization  visual-understanding  visuo  volo-avolo  vr  web  wire-guided  workflow  working-stiff  worrydream  worse-is-better/the-right-thing  writing  yak-shaving  yoga  👳  🖥 

Copy this bookmark:



description:


tags: