nhaliday + short-circuit   37

bash - Queue up commands while one command is being executed - Unix & Linux Stack Exchange
Press Ctrl+Z and immediately run bg. This causes the current command to keep running in the background. Then you can use fg && otherCommand to schedule otherCommand after the current one.

To make this easier, I've configured Ctrl+Z in my shell to run bg when I press it on an empty command line. See In zsh, how can I more quickly disown the foreground process? and How do you send command line apps directly to the background? ; I haven't checked if modern versions of bash make it easy to do the same.
q-n-a  stackex  unix  terminal  howto  workflow  short-circuit  tip-of-tongue 
september 2017 by nhaliday
What kills, current or voltage? - Quora
Its an oversimplification to say that voltage kills or current kills and the cause of much misunderstanding.
 
You cannot have one without the other, therefore one could claim that answering one or the other is correct.
 
However, it is the current THROUGH key parts of the body that can be lethal. BUT even a lot of Current in a wire won't harm you if the current is constrained to the wire..
 
Specifically in order for you to be electrocuted, the voltage must be high enough to drive a lethal amount of current through your body over coming body resistance, the voltage must be applied in the right places so that the current path is through your (usually) heart muscle, and it must be long enough duration to stop the heart muscle due to fibrillation.

another good answer:
As I write this note, I’m looking at the textbook Basic Engineering Circuit Analysis by Irwin and Nelms (ISBN 0-471-48728-7). On page 449 the authors reference the work of Dr. John G. Webster who suggests the body resistance values that I have taken the liberty to sketch into this poor character.
nibble  q-n-a  qra  physics  electromag  dirty-hands  embodied  safety  short-circuit  IEEE  data  objektbuch  death 
september 2017 by nhaliday
electricity - Why is AC more "dangerous" than DC? - Physics Stack Exchange
One of the reasons that AC might be considered more dangerous is that it arguably has more ways of getting into your body. Since the voltage alternates, it can cause current to enter and exit your body even without a closed loop, since your body (and what ground it's attached to) has capacitance. DC cannot do that. Also, AC is quite easily stepped up to higher voltages using transformers, while with DC that requires some relatively elaborate electronics. Finally, while your skin has a fairly high resistance to protect you, and the air is also a terrific insulator as long as you're not touching any wires, sometimes the inductance of AC transformers can cause high-voltage sparks that break down the air and I imagine can get through your skin a bit as well.

Also, like you mentioned, the heart is controlled by electric pulses and repeated pulses of electricity can throw this off quite a bit and cause a heart attack. However, I don't think that this is unique to alternating current. I read once about an unfortunate young man that was learning about electricity and wanted to measure the resistance of his own body. He took a multimeter and set a lead to each thumb. By accident or by stupidity, he punctured both thumbs with the leads, and the small (I imagine it to be 9 V) battery in the multimeter caused a current in his bloodstream, and he died on the spot. So maybe ignorance is more dangerous than either AC or DC.
nibble  q-n-a  overflow  physics  electromag  dirty-hands  embodied  safety  short-circuit  IEEE  death 
september 2017 by nhaliday
diffusion - Surviving under water in air bubble - Physics Stack Exchange
I get d≈400md≈400m.

It's interesting to note that this is independent of pressure: I've neglected pressure dependence of DD and human resilience to carbon dioxide, and the maximum safe concentration of carbon dioxide is independent of pressure, just derived from measurements at STP.

Finally, a bubble this large will probably rapidly break up due to buoyancy and Plateau-Rayleigh instabilities.
nibble  q-n-a  overflow  physics  mechanics  h2o  safety  short-circuit  tidbits  gedanken  fluid  street-fighting 
august 2017 by nhaliday
Caesar and the Pirates - Livius
[2.4] He also wrote poems and speeches which he read aloud to them, and if they failed to admire his work, he would call them to their faces illiterate savages, and would often laughingly threaten to have them all hanged. They were much taken with this and attributed his freedom of speech to a kind of simplicity in his character or boyish playfulness.

...

[2.7] Junius, however, cast longing eyes at the money, which came to a considerable sum, and kept saying that he needed time to look into the case.Caesar paid no further attention to him. He went to Pergamon, took the pirates out of prison and crucified the lot of them, just as he had often told them he would do when he was on the island and they imagined that he was joking.

Caesar was alpha
history  iron-age  mediterranean  the-classics  lol  stories  martial  nietzschean  vitality  short-circuit  death  nihil  civilization  conquest-empire  courage  power  god-man-beast-victim 
june 2017 by nhaliday
Rescuing drowning children: How to know when someone is in trouble in the water.
In 10 percent of drownings, adults are nearby but have no idea the victim is dying. Here’s what to look for.
news  org:lite  human-bean  howto  embodied  safety  swimming  h2o  short-circuit  parenting  fluid 
may 2017 by nhaliday
The Association for Psychological Pseudoscience presents . . . - Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science
Hey! The organization that publishes all those Psychological Science-style papers has scheduled their featured presentations for their next meeting.

Included are:
– That person who slaps the label “terrorists” on people who have the nerve to question their statistical errors.
– One of the people who claimed that women were 20 percentage points were likely to vote for Barack Obama, during a certain time of the month.
– One of the people who claimed that women are three times as likely to wear red, during a certain time of the month.
– The editor of the notorious PPNAS papers on himmicanes, air rage, and ages ending in 9.
– One of the people who claimed, “That a person can, by assuming two simple 1-min poses, embody power and instantly become more powerful has real-world, actionable implications.”
– Yet another researcher who responded to a failed replication without even acknowledging the possibility that their original claims might have been in error.
– The person who claimed, “Barring intentional fraud, every finding is an accurate description of the sample on which it was run.”

The whole thing looks like a power play. The cargo-cult social psychologists have the power, and they’re going to use it. They’ll show everyone who’s boss. Nobody’s gonna use concerns such as failed replications, lack of face validity, and questionable research practices to push them around!

...

It’s a guild, man, nuthin but an ivy-covered Chamber of Commerce. Which is fine—restraint of trade is as American as baseball, hot dogs, apple pie, and Chevrolet.

The only trouble is that I’m guessing that the Association for Psychological Science has thousands of members who have no interest in protecting the interests of this particular club. I said it before and I’ll say it again: Psychology is not just a club of academics, and “psychological science” is not just the name of their treehouse.

Scientists are furious after a famous psychologist accused her peers of 'methodological terrorism': http://www.businessinsider.com/susan-fiske-methodological-terrorism-2016-9

When the Revolution Came for Amy Cuddy: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/10/18/magazine/when-the-revolution-came-for-amy-cuddy.html
As a young social psychologist, she played by the rules and won big: an influential study, a viral TED talk, a prestigious job at Harvard. Then, suddenly, the rules changed.

https://twitter.com/StuartJRitchie/status/920934644840849408
Silly me! I thought the rule "don't seek massive publicity for extremely flimsy results" had been around forever...

https://twitter.com/aleksjoksic/status/921507320978427904
Feeling victimized by criticism & the want to keep it quiet is related to a certain sex difference in doing science/intellectual discourse..
One mode is more masculine,the other is more feminine.@Steve_Sailer has great excerpts from Alastair Roberts on this http://www.unz.com/isteve/intellectual-discourse-taking/
gelman  scitariat  rant  critique  social-science  psychology  social-psych  replication  events  westminster  error  academia  commentary  science  drama  news  org:biz  org:lite  multi  realness  truth  org:mag  profile  longform  twitter  social  albion  gender  gender-diff  identity-politics  personality  emotion  short-circuit  meta:rhetoric  debate  gnon  isteveish  absolute-relative  egalitarianism-hierarchy  anomie  social-norms  quotes  responsibility 
april 2017 by nhaliday
Verbal fluency test - Wikipedia
Performance in verbal fluency tests show a number of consistent characteristics in both children and adults:[6][7][8]
- There is an hyperbolic decline in the rate of production of new items over the duration of the task.
- More typical category exemplars are produced with higher frequency (i.e. by more subjects), and earlier in lists, than less typical ones.
- Items are produced in bursts of semantically-related words in the case of the semantic version and phonetic in the case of phonetic version.

The analysis reveals that children have schematic organization for this category according to which animals are grouped by where they are most commonly seen (on the farm, at home, in the ocean, at the zoo). Children, adults, and even zoology PhD candidates, all show this same tendency to cluster animals according to the environmental context in which they are observed.[14]
language  quiz  methodology  psychology  cog-psych  neurons  psychometrics  iq  wiki  reference  distribution  psych-architecture  short-circuit 
february 2017 by nhaliday
physiology - Can you break a person's neck with a manual head twist? - Skeptics Stack Exchange
A: yes, but not like in the movies

fun facts:
First, with regards to actually breaking the neck itself, it depends on exactly what type of fracture is involved, but cadaver studies have shown a range of 840 to 1500 N to cause the C2 vertebrae to be fractured [1]. A C2 fracture is highly correlated with high mortality but said injury is also most commonly associated with motor vehicle accidents [2] which gives you an idea as to the force involved with the injury. Given that amateur boxers have been shown to generate up to 8000 N of force with a hook punch [3] it is within the realm of possibility to fracture the vertebrae under the right conditions.

So breaking the vertebra is possible; however, the issue the video and those like it is that you need to apply the pressure the right way and the neck itself is built with a fair degree of flexibility [4] so it's not just a matter of twisting the neck a given way.

This takes us to the next point, as some blogs have already pointed out, the technique she is describing in and of itself doesn't seem like a viable technique. Neck cranks or spinal locks are taught; however, you will note that they tend to require that additional leverage be applied to the body and have been known to injure the person they are applied to.

https://www.quora.com/Murder-How-hard-is-it-to-kill-someone-by-twisting-their-neck
q-n-a  stackex  trivia  death  safety  embodied  short-circuit  fighting  multi  qra 
february 2017 by nhaliday
Ars longa, vita brevis - Wikipedia
pronounced arrz long-uh, vite-uh brev-is

Vita brevis,
ars longa,
occasio praeceps,
experimentum periculosum,
iudicium difficile.

Life is short,
and art long,
opportunity fleeting,
experimentations perilous,
and judgment difficult.
language  aphorism  meaningness  europe  mediterranean  history  wiki  reference  death  foreign-lang  time  iron-age  medieval  the-classics  wisdom  nihil  short-circuit  wire-guided  s:*  poetry 
january 2017 by nhaliday
Psychological comments: Does Age make us sage or sag?
Khan on Twitter: "figure on right from @tuckerdrob lab is depressing (the knowledge plateau). do i read in vain??? https://t.co/DZzBD8onEv": https://twitter.com/razibkhan/status/809439911627493377
- reasoning rises then declines after age ~20
- knowledge plateaus by age 35-40
- different interpretation provided by study authors w/ another graph (renewal)
- study (can't find the exact graph anywhere): http://www.iapsych.com/wj3ewok/LinkedDocuments/McArdle2002.pdf

School’s out: https://westhunt.wordpress.com/2016/12/29/schools-out/
I saw a note by Razib Khan, in which he mentioned that psychometric research suggests that people plateau in their knowledge base as adults. I could believe it. But I’m not sure it’s true in my case. One might estimate total adult knowledge in terms of BS equivalents…

Age-related IQ decline is reduced markedly after adjustment for the Flynn effect: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/20349385/
Twenty-year-olds outperform 70-year-olds by as much as 2.3 standard deviations (35 IQ points) on subtests of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS). We show that most of the difference can be attributed to an intergenerational rise in IQ known as the Flynn effect.

...

For these verbal subtests, the Flynn effect masked a modest increase in ability as individuals grow older.

Predictors of ageing-related decline across multiple cognitive functions: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0160289616302707
Cognitive ageing is likely a process with few large-effect predictors

A strong link between speed of visual discrimination and cognitive ageing: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4123160/
Results showed a moderate correlation (r = 0.460) between inspection time performance and intelligence, and a strong correlation between change in inspection time and change in intelligence from 70 to 76 (r = 0.779). These results support the processing speed theory of cognitive ageing. They go beyond cross-sectional correlation to show that cognitive change is accompanied by changes in basic visual information processing as we age.
albion  psychology  cog-psych  psychometrics  aging  iq  objektbuch  long-term  longitudinal  study  summary  variance-components  scitariat  multi  gnxp  learning  metabuch  twitter  social  discussion  pic  data  planning  tradeoffs  flux-stasis  volo-avolo  west-hunter  studying  knowledge  age-generation  flexibility  rigidity  plots  manifolds  universalism-particularism  being-becoming  essence-existence  intelligence  stock-flow  large-factor  psych-architecture  visuo  correlation  time  speed  short-circuit  roots  flynn  trends  dysgenics  language  explanans  direction  chart 
december 2016 by nhaliday
Last Ditch | West Hunter
Various responses have led me to think about what nations are willing to do in the last extremity, when they see doom impending. Over the Cold War, now apparently forgotten, major nations seemed willing to take the enemy down with them, more or less completely. Thousands of nuclear weapons can do that.

...

I suspect that the Soviets used tularemia at Stalingrad in 1942, but many seem to think that the natural default hypothesis is that Stalin would never have done such a thing. Churchill was ready with anthrax if the Germany ever managed to cross the channel.

didn't know that about Churchill

motives for the Civil War and WW2 (later on down the thread): https://westhunt.wordpress.com/2016/11/27/last-ditch/#comment-85471
For the North, more about preserving union than destroying slavery. For the South, mostly about protecting slavery, but also about a growing nationalism based on a different way of life – one based on slavery. Slavery Slavery Slavery.

...

“Has mankind no experience of somewhat hostile countries living side by side without killing 5% of their population?” Not much, no. I find myself at a disadvantage in this kind of argument, since my head is filling up with all the bloody noise of history, far faster than I can type. There are a few hundred books you should read that might give you more perspective on this, but why not start with Thucydides?

https://westhunt.wordpress.com/2016/11/27/last-ditch/#comment-85491
In 1914, the great majority of the world’s productive capacity was in Europe. Any country that dominated the continent would been the number one world power. If you value your national independence, you don’t want that. So: when somebody threatens to take over Europe, you oppose them. The same reason that England, and other nations, opposed Imperial Spain at its height – it threatened to dominate Europe. For the same reason that England and others opposed France for a couple of hundred years: the same reason that people resisted Germany, the same reason nations resisted the Soviet Union. Why did Sparta oppose Athens? It’s still the same old story.

Here I thought that all of my audience read the Cambridge Modern History while waiting in the dentists’s office. Boy was I wrong!
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november 2016 by nhaliday
Rabbit starvation - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
need fat (and maybe not too much protein?) to survive, rabbit meat too lean
embodied  safety  disease  nutrition  wiki  reference  metabolic  survival  short-circuit  prepping  outdoors 
september 2016 by nhaliday

bundles : embodied

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