nhaliday + endurance   22

“Give Anything” | An Algorithmic Lucidity
As a freshman on my high school's cross country team, our captain told me that to be a good runner, you needed to love pain.

I objected: a great runner could love to race, I said, and endure the pain only for the sake of competing and winning.

It's only fifteen years later (practically one foot in the grave), that I now see that I was wrong and he was right.
ratty  techtariat  aphorism  running  fitness  stoic  impetus  ends-means  biases  emotion  endurance 
7 weeks ago by nhaliday
Stretching and injury prevention: an obscure relationship. - PubMed - NCBI
Sports involving bouncing and jumping activities with a high intensity of stretch-shortening cycles (SSCs) [e.g. soccer and football] require a muscle-tendon unit that is compliant enough to store and release the high amount of elastic energy that benefits performance in such sports. If the participants of these sports have an insufficient compliant muscle-tendon unit, the demands in energy absorption and release may rapidly exceed the capacity of the muscle-tendon unit. This may lead to an increased risk for injury of this structure. Consequently, the rationale for injury prevention in these sports is to increase the compliance of the muscle-tendon unit. Recent studies have shown that stretching programmes can significantly influence the viscosity of the tendon and make it significantly more compliant, and when a sport demands SSCs of high intensity, stretching may be important for injury prevention. This conjecture is in agreement with the available scientific clinical evidence from these types of sports activities. In contrast, when the type of sports activity contains low-intensity, or limited SSCs (e.g. jogging, cycling and swimming) there is no need for a very compliant muscle-tendon unit since most of its power generation is a consequence of active (contractile) muscle work that needs to be directly transferred (by the tendon) to the articular system to generate motion. Therefore, stretching (and thus making the tendon more compliant) may not be advantageous. This conjecture is supported by the literature, where strong evidence exists that stretching has no beneficial effect on injury prevention in these sports.
study  survey  health  embodied  fitness  fitsci  biomechanics  sports  soccer  running  endurance  evidence-based  null-result  realness  contrarianism  homo-hetero  comparison  embodied-pack 
november 2017 by nhaliday
Dr. Pribut on Runner's Knee (Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome)
Abnormal knee joint moments
Abnormal pronation of the foot
Weak Vastus Medialis
Weak Quadriceps Muscles
Tight Hamstrings or calf muscles
Weak Hip Abductors
Canted Surface

Do posterior muscle stretches (hamstrings and calf muscles)
Do Straight Leg Lifts (Start with 3 sets of 10, work up to 10 sets of 10)
Supine bridges 10-15, Later single leg bridges 8-12
Check Your Feet and Shoes, overpronation often contributes to this problem
org:junk  org:health  health  embodied  fitness  fitsci  running  endurance  biomechanics 
november 2017 by nhaliday
Injury prevention in runners - "skimpy research" | RunningPhysio
Wherever possible RunningPhysio tries to be evidence based but in many cases there is a lack of high quality research. Extensive advice exists on injury prevention in runners and yet the research underpinning that advice is very limited, so limited in fact that one recent study described it as “skimpy”! So we decided we'd examine this “skimpy research”.
org:health  health  fitness  fitsci  evidence-based  running  embodied  analysis  survey  endurance 
october 2017 by nhaliday
CURRENT CONCEPTS IN MUSCLE STRETCHING FOR EXERCISE AND REHABILITATION
Three muscle stretching techniques are frequently described in the literature: Static, Dynamic, and Pre-Contraction stretches (Figure 2).

Static stretching is effective at increasing ROM.

Unfortunately, however, static stretching as part of a warm-up immediately prior to exercise has been shown detrimental to dynamometer-measured muscle strength19–29 and performance in running and jumping.30–39 The loss of strength resulting from acute static stretching has been termed, “stretch-induced strength loss.”3 The specific causes for this type of stretch induced loss in strength is not clear; some suggest neural factors,31,40 while others suggest mechanical factors.19,23

In general, it appears that static stretching is most beneficial for athletes requiring flexibility for their sports (e.g. gymnastics, dance, etc.). Dynamic stretching may be better suited for athletes requiring running or jumping performance30 during their sport such as basketball players or sprinters.

Stretching has not been shown to be effective at reducing the incidence of overall injuries.88 While there is some evidence of stretching reducing musculotendinous injuries,88 more evidence is needed to determine if stretching programs alone can reduce muscular injuries.3
study  health  fitness  fitsci  evidence-based  running  embodied  sports  survey  summary  biomechanics  endurance  embodied-pack 
august 2017 by nhaliday
The Achiness Of The Long Distance Runner | FiveThirtyEight
Athletes sometimes refer to ibuprofen as “vitamin I,” because so many of them pop it before or after workouts in hopes of reducing inflammation and decreasing soreness and pain. But a new study found that ibuprofen did not reduce blood markers of muscle damage or subjective muscle soreness after a hard weight training session. It was a small study, just 16 participants, but it’s not the first to suggest that ibuprofen doesn’t blunt post-exercise muscle soreness. A previous study of ibuprofen use in ultramarathon runners found that the drug failed to reduce muscle pain or soreness, and blood tests showed that runners who took it actually experienced greater levels of inflammation than those who eschewed the drug.
sports  running  medicine  meta-analysis  data  study  org:data  endurance  health 
august 2016 by nhaliday
Sprinters Should Start Fast; Everyone Else Should Finish Fast | FiveThirtyEight
the optimal strategy for races longer than 800 meters is to run a fast, even pace with each lap the same speed until the final kick
data  running  sports  analysis  org:data  news  endurance  fitsci 
august 2016 by nhaliday

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