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Preventing the Collapse of Civilization [video] | Hacker News
- Jonathan Blow

NB: DevGAMM is a game industry conference

- loss of technological knowledge (Antikythera mechanism, aqueducts, etc.)
- hardware driving most gains, not software
- software's actually less robust, often poorly designed and overengineered these days
- knowledge of trivia becomes more than general, deep knowledge
- does at least acknowledge value of DRY, reusing code, abstraction saving dev time
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5 days ago by nhaliday
Information Processing: Moore's Law and AI
Hint to technocratic planners: invest more in physicists, chemists, and materials scientists. The recent explosion in value from technology has been driven by physical science -- software gets way too much credit. From the former we got a factor of a million or more in compute power, data storage, and bandwidth. From the latter, we gained (perhaps) an order of magnitude or two in effectiveness: how much better are current OSes and programming languages than Unix and C, both of which are ~50 years old now?

...

Of relevance to this discussion: a big chunk of AlphaGo's performance improvement over other Go programs is due to raw compute power (link via Jess Riedel). The vertical axis is ELO score. You can see that without multi-GPU compute, AlphaGo has relatively pedestrian strength.
hsu  scitariat  comparison  software  hardware  performance  sv  tech  trends  ai  machine-learning  deep-learning  deepgoog  google  roots  impact  hard-tech  multiplicative  the-world-is-just-atoms  technology  trivia  cocktail  big-picture  hi-order-bits 
5 days ago by nhaliday
Burrito: Rethinking the Electronic Lab Notebook
Seems very well-suited for ML experiments (if you can get it to work), also the nilfs aspect is cool and basically implements exactly one of the my project ideas (mini-VCS for competitive programming). Unfortunately gnarly installation instructions specify running it on Linux VM: https://github.com/pgbovine/burrito/blob/master/INSTALL. Linux is hard requirement due to nilfs.
techtariat  project  tools  devtools  linux  programming  yak-shaving  integration-extension  nitty-gritty  workflow  exocortex  scholar  software  python  app  desktop  notetaking  state  machine-learning  data-science  nibble  sci-comp  oly  vcs  multi  repo  paste 
6 days ago by nhaliday
Philip Guo - Research Design Patterns
List of ways to generate research directions. Some are pretty specific to applied CS.
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6 days ago by nhaliday
architecture - What is the most effective way to add functionality to unfamiliar, structurally unsound code? - Software Engineering Stack Exchange
If the required changes are small then follow the original coding style, that way someone picking up the code after you only needs to get used to one set idiosyncrasies.

If the required changes are large and the changes are concentrated in a few functions or modules, then, take the opportunity to refactor these modules and clean up the code.

Above all do not re-factor working code which has nothing to do with the immediate change request. It takes too much time, it introduces bugs, and, you may inadvertently stamp on a business rule that has taken years to perfect. Your boss will hate you for being so slow to deliver small changes, and, your users will hate you for crashing a system that ran for years without problems.

--

Rule 1: the better skilled are the developers who wrote the code, the more refactoring vs. rewriting from scratch you must use.

Rule 2: the larger is the project, the more refactoring vs. rewriting from scratch you must use.
q-n-a  stackex  programming  engineering  best-practices  flux-stasis  retrofit  code-dive  working-stiff  advice 
8 days ago by nhaliday
Reverse salients | West Hunter
Edison thought in terms of reverse salients and critical problems.

“Reverse salients are areas of research and development that are lagging in some obvious way behind the general line of advance. Critical problems are the research questions, cast in terms of the concrete particulars of currently available knowledge and technique and of specific exemplars or models that are solvable and whose solutions would eliminate the reverse salients. ”

What strikes you as as important current example of a reverse salient, and the associated critical problem or problems?
west-hunter  scitariat  discussion  science  technology  innovation  low-hanging  list  top-n  research  open-problems  the-world-is-just-atoms  marginal  definite-planning  frontier  🔬  speedometer  ideas  the-trenches  hi-order-bits 
8 days ago by nhaliday
its-not-software - steveyegge2
You don't work in the software industry.

...

So what's the software industry, and how do we differ from it?

Well, the software industry is what you learn about in school, and it's what you probably did at your previous company. The software industry produces software that runs on customers' machines — that is, software intended to run on a machine over which you have no control.

So it includes pretty much everything that Microsoft does: Windows and every application you download for it, including your browser.

It also includes everything that runs in the browser, including Flash applications, Java applets, and plug-ins like Adobe's Acrobat Reader. Their deployment model is a little different from the "classic" deployment models, but it's still software that you package up and release to some unknown client box.

...

Servware

Our industry is so different from the software industry, and it's so important to draw a clear distinction, that it needs a new name. I'll call it Servware for now, lacking anything better. Hardware, firmware, software, servware. It fits well enough.

Servware is stuff that lives on your own servers. I call it "stuff" advisedly, since it's more than just software; it includes configuration, monitoring systems, data, documentation, and everything else you've got there, all acting in concert to produce some observable user experience on the other side of a network connection.
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8 days ago by nhaliday
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