mngful + frixion-fric.psy   787

The Land That Failed to Fail - The New York Times
mainland China now produces more graduates in science and engineering every year than the United States, Japan, South Korea and Taiwan combined

Mr. Xi preaches self-reliance and warns of the threats posed by “hostile foreign forces.”

“The cost of censorship is quite limited compared to the great value created by the internet,” said Chen Tong, an industry pioneer. “We still get the information we need for economic progress.”

Prosperity has brought rising expectations in China; the public wants more than just economic growth. It wants cleaner air, safer food and medicine, better health care and schools, less corruption and greater equality. The party is struggling to deliver, and tweaks to the report cards it uses to measure the performance of officials hardly seem enough.
frixion-fric.psy 
20 hours ago by mngful
Subscription news services flourish as Google, Facebook dominate ads
You can't put the genie back in the bottle," media executives would lament. People can't be re-trained to pay for what they're already getting for free.
frixion-fric.psy  price.psy 
yesterday by mngful
"I hooked a neural network up to my Roomba. I wanted it to learn to navigate without bumping into things, so I set up a reward scheme to encourage speed and discourage hitting the bumper sensors. It learnt to drive backwards, because there are no bumpers
"I hooked a neural network up to my Roomba. I wanted it to learn to navigate without bumping into things, so I set up a reward scheme to encourage speed and discourage hitting the bumper sensors. It learnt to drive backwards, because there are no bumpers on the back.… https://t.co/txou3oNTd5"
frixion-fric.psy 
9 days ago by mngful
Troy Hunt: Here's Why [Insert Thing Here] Is Not a Password Killer
the conversation is going to get shut down as soon as you start asking companies to impose friction on their user
frixion-fric.psy 
14 days ago by mngful
Breakfast has resisted globalisation, until now | 1843
The conservatism of breakfast is all the more striking given the way in which people devour foreign dishes at other times of day

But there are psychological reasons for the reluctance to taste new foods for breakfast that lie beyond the faff of early-morning culinary creativity. People are at their most vulnerable first thing; the day has not yet properly begun and breakfast needs to be safe and reassuring. It is the most conservative meal of the day in all cultures, says Kaori O’Connor, an anthropologist who has written a book about the English breakfast. “We have fusion global food. But in all cultures there remains breakfast. It’s a sacrament with which you begin the day. You can go wacko later,” she continues, “but you want to start ‘right’ whatever that may be. You want to gird your loins; you’re emerging from sleep…You want to know that you’re getting a good start.”

The answer was breakfast cereals. The first example was created in 1863 by James Jackson, a doctor and disciple of Sylvester Graham (he of cracker fame). He concocted “granula”, twice-baked whole-wheat crackers, broken into small chunks. But it was John Harvey Kellogg who began the true revolution of Western breakfasts. A poverty-stricken medical student, he was annoyed at the time it took him to prepare a bowl of hot porridge: grains such as oats and buckwheat required hours of boiling and cooking to become a palatable mush. Why could he not buy cooked and ready-to-eat cereals at the grocery store?

After one woman apparently complained that she broke a tooth, Kellogg created a version that was broken into crumbs that became known as granola.
frixion-fric.psy  #bk  creativity.psy 
18 days ago by mngful
Scientists uncover why you can't decide what to order for lunch: A new Caltech study finds the brain regions responsible for the choice overload effect -- ScienceDaily
Researchers explore the choice overload effect, a phenomenon that hampers the brain's ability to make a decision when there are too many options.

The fMRI scans revealed brain activity in two regions while the participants were making their choices: the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), where the potential costs and benefits of decisions are weighed, Camerer says; and the striatum, a part of the brain responsible for determining value

Camerer says that pattern of activity is probably the result of the striatum and the ACC interacting and weighing the increasing potential for reward (getting a picture they really like for their mug) against the increasing amount of work the brain will have to do to evaluate possible outcomes.

Together, mental effort and the potential reward result in a sweet spot where the reward isn't too low and the effort isn't too high

"Essentially, our eyes are bigger than our stomachs,"

Camerer says future research in this area could explore and attempt to quantify the mental costs of making a decision.

"What is mental effort? What does thinking cost? It's poorly understood," he says.
choice.psy  frixion-fric.psy 
29 days ago by mngful
Opinion | How to Make a Big Decision - The New York Times
In the early 1980s, a business school professor named Paul Nutt set out to catalog real-world decisions the way a botanist might catalog the various types of vegetation growing in a rain forest. In his initial study, published in 1984, he analyzed 78 decisions made by senior managers at a range of public and private organizations in the United States and Canada: insurance companies, government agencies, hospitals, consulting firms.

The most striking finding in Professor Nutt’s research was this: Only 15 percent of the decisions he studied involved a stage where the decision makers actively sought out a new option beyond the initial choices on the table. In a later study, he found that only 29 percent of organizational decision makers contemplated more than one alternative.

This turns out to be a bad strategy. Over the years, Professor Nutt and other researchers have demonstrated a strong correlation between the number of alternatives deliberated and the ultimate success of the decision itself. In one of his studies, Professor Nutt found that participants who considered only one alternative ultimately judged their decision a failure more than 50 percent of the time, while decisions that involved contemplating at least two alternatives were felt to be successes two-thirds of the time.

What’s the best way to expand your pool of options? Researchers suggest that if possible, you diversify the group of people who are helping make the decision.

hile the more diverse groups were better at reaching the truth, they were also far less confident in the decisions they made. They were both more likely to be right and, at the same time, more open to the idea that they might be wrong.

The psychologist Gary Klein has developed a variation on this technique. He calls it a “premortem.” “Our exercise,” Dr. Klein explains, “is to ask planners to imagine that it is months into the future and that their plan has been carried out. And it has failed. That is all they know; they have to explain why they think it failed.”

In Dr. Klein’s experience, the premortem has proved to be a much more effective way to tease out the potential flaws in a decision. A whole range of bad cognitive habits — from groupthink to confirmation bias — tends to blind us to the potential pitfalls of a decision once we have committed to it. It isn’t enough to simply ask yourself, “Are there any flaws here in this plan that I’m missing?” By forcing yourself to imagine scenarios where the decision turned out to be a disastrous one, you can think your way around those blind spots and that false sense of confidence.

The ultimate limitation of the pros and cons list is that we are merely transcribing our existing understanding of the decision at hand and not seeing it with fresh eyes. “One thing a person cannot do, no matter how rigorous his analysis or heroic his imagination,” the economist and Nobel laureate Thomas Schelling once observed, “is to draw up a list of things that would never occur to him.”

And yet hard choices require us to make those kinds of imaginative leaps: to discover new paths and outcomes that had not been visible to us when we first started wrestling with the decision. It is the nature of complex decisions that they are all unique constellations of variables. These new tools simply help us see each constellation more clearly, from fresh angles.
frixion-fric.psy  decisioncraft.decisions.psy 
4 weeks ago by mngful
Training The Brain Of An Entrepreneur
She gave her subjects two psychological assessments. The first measured what is called “cold decision making,” a kind of logical choosing where data is king and feelings play no part. The second measured “hot decision-making,” or decision-making in the face of risk, where emotions always play a significant factor.
risk.psy  decisioncraft.decisions.psy  frixion-fric.psy 
4 weeks ago by mngful
Code of Practice for consumer IoT security - GOV.UK
gov.uk simplicity

a significant number of devices on the market today have been found to lack basic security measures
frixion-fric.psy 
5 weeks ago by mngful
Jonathan Haidt on Twitter: "if you're wondering why American democracy seems to have decayed so quickly, the graph below gives a big part of the story. When groups hate each other, they more easily believe that the ends justify the means. (From new Hether
Jonathan Haidt on Twitter: "if you're wondering why American democracy seems to have decayed so quickly, the graph below gives a big part of the story. When groups hate each other, they more easily believe that the ends justify the means. (From new Hetherington & Weiler book: https://t.co/GNK59hx6l5 )… https://t.co/HWJNx1flKh"
hate.psy  frixion-fric.psy 
6 weeks ago by mngful
DealBook on Twitter: "The decline of Mark & Spencer's fortunes has been so precipitous that this summer the company was almost dropped from the FTSE 100. “M&S is currently teetering on the edge of relegation,” said one industry analyst. https://t.co/g
The decline of Mark & Spencer's fortunes has been so precipitous that this summer the company was almost dropped from the FTSE 100. “M&S is currently teetering on the edge of relegation,” said one industry analyst.
frixion-fric.psy 
6 weeks ago by mngful
The Myth of The Infrastructure Phase | Union Square Ventures
Apps and infrastructure evolve in responsive cycles, not distinct, separate phases -- First, apps inspire infrastructure. Then that infrastructure enables new apps.
frixion-fric.psy 
7 weeks ago by mngful
Alibaba's Daniel Zhang tells employees not to ‘live for KPIs’ in first internal speech since being named Jack Ma’s successor | South China Morning Post
Ma has stated that he hopes Alibaba will last “at least 102 years” with the mission to “make it easy to do business anywhere”

...the company's dream is to create value for the customers they serve.

He exhorted employees to do their best to meet their own expectations, instead of caring what others think, and not give up when they meet resistance or obstacles – especially when it came to new business models and innovative projects that have not been tried before.

“Many of our businesses have been the same for over 10 years, and if we keep doing things the same way today, or five years later, then Alibaba won't have a future,” Zhang said, adding that his greatest fear was that Alibaba would become like a “robot on loop”.

“No battle has ever been won by merely copying others.”
alibaba.brd  frixion-fric.psy 
7 weeks ago by mngful
Archillect on Twitter: "… "
everything isamazing and nobody is happy
frixion-fric.psy 
8 weeks ago by mngful
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