mcmorgan + politics   19

100 days of gibberish – Trump has weaponised nonsense
> Without language, there is no accountability, no standard of truth. If Trump never says anything concrete, he never has to do anything concrete. If Trump never makes a statement of commitment, Trump supporters never have to confront what they really voted for. If his promises are vague to the point of opacity, Trump cannot be criticised for breaking them.
politics  rhetoric  trump 
29 days ago by mcmorgan
Has Trump Stolen Philosophy’s Critical Tools? - The New York Times
> Trump’s playbook should be familiar to any student of critical theory and philosophy. It often feels like Trump has stolen our ideas and weaponized them.

They always were weapons. Derrida, Foucault, Latour weigh in at the Weapons Exchange
critical_thinking  politics  rhetoric 
5 weeks ago by mcmorgan
Why are liberals now cheerleading a warmongering Trump? | Owen Jones | Opinion | The Guardian
Handing over the keys?

> History shows that war presents the ideal opportunity for the authoritarian-minded to amass, consolidate and concentrate power. Dissent can be more easily portrayed as treachery; jingoism sweeps the nation, boosting the popularity of the ruler; critics fall into line; constitutional norms can be disregarded at a time of national crisis.
polemic  politics  rhetoric_of_action  trump 
6 weeks ago by mcmorgan
Melania Trump and the politics of airbrushing - The Washington Post
Fashion meets politics in the open media, with some semiotics chucked in to start the discussion. "Mahaux has given the public a two-dimensional version of Trump: just the gloss, just the facade. Trump is the fantasy, the dream."
visualrhetoric  semiotics  politics 
7 weeks ago by mcmorgan
Trump Embraces One Of Russia's Favorite Propaganda Tactics — Whataboutism : NPR
Rhetoric is *always* about policy.

> But whataboutism extends beyond rhetoric, said Dmitry Dubrovsky, a professor at Columbia University's School of International and Public Affairs. "It's not only a narrative practice; it's real policy," he said. "For example, the Russians installed a special institute to cover the violation of human rights in the United States."
epistemology  politics  rhetoric  trump 
9 weeks ago by mcmorgan
Donald Trump and the Enemies of the American People - The New Yorker
How to define the enemy as anyone who challenges power

> an old-fashioned autocrat wielding a very familiar rhetorical strategy.

> all follow a general pattern. They attack and threaten the press with deliberate and ominous intensity; the press, in turn, adopts a more oppositional tone and role. “And then that paves the way for the autocrat’s next move,” Simon told me. “Popular support for the media dwindles and the leader starts instituting restrictions. It’s an old strategy.” Simon pointed to Trump’s lack of originality, recalling that both Néstor Kirchner, of Argentina, and Tabaré Ramón Vázquez, of Uruguay, referred to the press as the “unelected political opposition.” And, as Simon has written, it was the late Hugo Chávez who first mastered Twitter as a way of bypassing the media and providing his supporters with alternative facts.
trump  politics  rhetoric 
february 2017 by mcmorgan
Trump’s America, where even park employees have become enemies of the state | Sarah Kendzior | Opinion | The Guardian
A consideration of Trump's alternative facts and their rhetorical use. They make any poster of facts an involuntary dissident.

> What Americans have learned is that our system of checks and balances is so weak that even parks employees can become enemies of the state. They are learning their rights as they lose them, grieving for what they once took for granted. Fear is matched by incredulity that hundreds of years of imperfect democracy could cede into autocracy with such ease. Trump’s win was followed by debate over what it means to live in a “post-facts” world. This was a fatuous debate: if facts did not matter, then Trump and his team, whose threats of punishment and litigation long preceded his official lock on power, would not work so hard to suppress them. The idea of a fact always mattered – it simply had to be the Trump administration’s facts that counted. Trump’s adviser, Kellyanne Conway, made this blatant last weekend when she stated that the administration would proffer “alternative facts” that justified its political aims.

> America has become a country of involuntary dissidents, where those who seek to stay employed respond to illusions with allusions. (“If you’re part of a group that’s paid to applaud, you’re a ‘claqueur’,” Merriam-Webster dictionary slyly tweeted after Trump’s CIA visit, which allegedly included an entourage who clapped on command.) The media are “the opposition” and should “keep its mouth shut”, according to Trump’s chief strategist, Steve Bannon. But in a digital age, where it is increasingly hard to classify who counts as “the media”, anyone who seeks to inform the public is potentially under attack.
rhetoric  trump  politics 
january 2017 by mcmorgan
The Music Donald Trump Can’t Hear - The New Yorker
The New Yorker weighs in on authoritarianism in the 21st century: "at that terrifying first press conference of Trump’s, on Wednesday, we saw the looming face of pure authoritarianism. Rewards are promised to the obedient: those good states that voted the right way, the “responsible” press. Punishments are threatened to the bad: “They’re going to suffer the consequences!” Intimidation is the greeting to any critic. And look! There’s a claque alongside to cheer the big boss and deride his doubters. This is what was once called Bonapartism: I won and I can now do anything I choose. Victory, however narrow, is license for all. Autocracy, after all, has always been compatible with plebiscitary endorsement. The point of constitutional government is to make even the victors subject to the rules."
politics  authoritarianism  trump 
january 2017 by mcmorgan
The Ecuadorian Library — Geek Empire — Medium
Sterling on Snowden, Assange, Wikileaks, NSA. Cleverness distracts from the point too often, but he might be opening a focus on an implication of all media converging, Kittler, media always being a misuse of military equipment.
Kittler  media_theory  essay  politics 
august 2013 by mcmorgan
oceaniaeuropeamericasafricaasia on Vimeo
Olympic rings reveal idealistic symmetry when data driven.
DH  politics 
august 2012 by mcmorgan
NSFW: Sarah Palin – How’s That Promotey, Embargoey Stuff Workin’ Out for Ya?
i love this guy, using the Palin Massive as a case study for author and publisher gamesmanship. Palin is all about control, and she's not going to get it from the open press. "Publishers simply don’t have the luxury of controlling the flow of information any more. The idea that they can release thousands of preview copies of a new title, in electronic form, weeks (or even months) ahead of publication and rely on a gentleman’s agreement with the press that their embargo will be respected is simply laughable."
publishing  politics 
november 2010 by mcmorgan

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