Instead of Writing a Thousand Words, Part One: Ideas
Takes a bit of loading (and battery) but worth a look
notes 
3 days ago
Mary Poppendieck's "The Tyranny of 'The Plan'" - Chris Gagné
Transcript about how the empire state building got built
notes 
3 days ago
The Waterfall methodology was a historic accident and they knew it | Hacker News
"What’s not so obvious is that a surprisingly small portion of what people think of as a software project is actually about software development.

Interacting with 3rd parties, writing contracts, hiring developers, planning how your project interacts with other projects and the wider organization, responding to regulations and external enquiries, managing the demand for certainty from stakeholders, obtaining funding, maintaining financial control..."

HN discussion of waterfall blog post, user jl6 nails it
notes  software 
3 days ago
Waterfall
Early paper on the software implementation process reveals an understanding of need for iteration
notes  software 
3 days ago
The End of a Red Giant - https://purpleidea.com/
Another take on the redhat acquisition by IBM. I had not realised that there was a tension within redhat between the gpl and the permissive licence bods
linux 
6 days ago
Untethered | Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn as he saw himself
"Instead, The Red Wheel depicts Russia as having been betrayed twice, by an indolent and corrupt homegrown elite, and by a hyperactive and destructive intelligentsia obsessed with implanting “foreign” ideas, which the author portrays as a liberal-socialist continuum. The Revolution becomes something alien. Concepts of foreign or alien, it must be said, present insurmountable difficulties for anyone who would write the history of Imperial Russia and the Revolution."
notes 
9 days ago
Show HN: Stock Trading from Google Spreadsheet | Hacker News
"I worked for one of the largest financials services companies in the world and they STILL use excel to drive their trading activities. They are so large and so complex that it's impossible to convert them because no one completely understands how it all works. They were developed by traders/market experts with no help from IT, for years IT didn't even knew they existed."

What could *possibly* go wrong?
notes  linux  algorithm 
11 days ago
Tom Sachs: Working to Code
Personally, I'd rather have a written text
notes 
13 days ago
Tom Sachs (artist) - Wikipedia
>> BULLET VIII: ALWAYS BE KNOLLING (ABK)

Scan your environment for materials, tools, books, music, etc. which are not in use.
Put away everything not in use. If you aren't sure, leave it out.
Group all 'like' objects.
Align or square all objects to either the surface they rest on, or the studio itself. <<

Quoted from the Wikipedia page
notes 
13 days ago
Robert Mueller's Endgame May Be in Sight
"With his major court filings, Mueller has already written more than 290 pages of the “Mueller Report.” As Lawfare’s Benjamin Wittes has said, if a 9/11 Commission–style body had gathered in the wake of the 2016 election to study Russian interference, its findings would read much like Mueller’s novelistic charges against the Internet Research Agency and the military intelligence agency commonly referred to as the GRU."

Hiding the 'report' in plain sight.
notes 
14 days ago
13brane.net
"TL;DR: Tarr is no longer maintaining a node.js package that everyone and their dog uses. No legitimate users step up to maintain said package, even though they depend on it. Tarr hands over said package to a “helpful” stranger, who immediately decides to monetize it via cryptocurrency pilfering. Internet polarization ensues."

Strikes me as a clueless outsider that this is an npm issue rather than an open source issue.
notes 
15 days ago
Killing 3ve: How The FBI And Tech Industry Took Down A Massive Ad Fraud Scheme
"Once on the websites, the bots were programmed to mimic human behavior such as mouse movements and clicks, and to click play on videos to ensure lucrative ads were displayed."

Turing test for modern times...
notes 
15 days ago
Wide-band WebSDR in Enschede, the Netherlands
This is both hilarious and amazing. Try 6098KHz on am.
notes 
16 days ago
Why Trump Can’t Stop Talking to the Press - POLITICO Magazine
"In a recent Politico article, Eliana Johnson and Daniel Lippman wrote of the days in which Trump allots to himself up to nine hours of “Executive Time,” in which he tweets, phones friends, watches TV and otherwise dawdles."

So who is actually running the country?
notes 
16 days ago
It's good to talk: Why the phone call needs to make a comeback - BBC Three
"And while we used to think nothing of using our mobile phones to, you know, actually make calls, we are now doing that less. In fact, Ofcom reported that in 2017 mobile voice calls dropped for the first time ever in the UK, with the total volume of calls made decreasing by 1.7%."

What could cause that drop other than behaviour change? Could it be firm action on cold calling?
notes  statistics 
16 days ago
Pruned: Gardens as Crypto-Water-Computers
"In the front right corner, in a structure that resembles a large cupboard with a transparent front, stands a Rube Goldberg collection of tubes, tanks, valves, pumps and sluices. You could think of it as a hydraulic computer. Water flows through a series of clear pipes, mimicking the way that money flows through the economy. It lets you see (literally) what would happen if you lower tax rates or increase the money supply or whatever; just open a valve here or pull a lever there and the machine sloshes away, showing in real time how the water levels rise and fall in various tanks representing the growth in personal savings, tax revenue, and so on."

I'm convinced that I can use pure data or spice to simulate an analogue computer simulating the dripping of a tap...
notes 
21 days ago
The “bicameral mind” 30 years on: a critical reappraisal of Julian Jaynes’ hypothesis
Julian Jaynes was an interesting character apart from his book which is densely written but thought provoking.
notes 
21 days ago
Ethan Akin, In Defense of "Mindless Rote"
"Following Whitehead, I propose to defend not thinking, to consider the relationship between thinking and not thinking and to describe how symbolism - particularly in mathematics - facilitates not thinking. Above all, I want to argue that all this avoidance of thought is a Good Thing."
notes  learning 
22 days ago
Analogue radio is the tech that just won't die • The Register
Data from OFCOM about device use by age and socio-economic group in the UK. 10Mb PDF download, useful for stats lessons
notes  statistics 
23 days ago
Bjørn Karmann › Objectifier
>> “Soon We Won’t Program Computers. We’ll Train Them Like Dogs” was one of the headlines in the Wired issue “The end of Code” from 2016. The dog training analogies inspired me to investigate the assumptions myself, and went on a quest to visit real dog trainers. <<

So the geezer built a device that you can train to associate actions with controls in your house.
learing 
26 days ago
TipsAndTricks/MultimediaOnCentOS7 - CentOS Wiki
Nux repository and epel are essential for Springdale Linux 7 I find.
linux 
26 days ago
The present phase of stagnation in the foundations of physics is not normal | Hacker News
Discussion about the viability of outrageous discovery in physics. As Peter Shor comments "So, people, go hide in your attics!"
physics  world 
26 days ago
Decentralising the web: Why is it so hard to achieve?
>> "When technology is built, the biases of its creators are often embedded into the technology itself in ways that are very hard for the creators to see, until it's used for a purpose you didn't intend," she said during an interview with Internet Archive. "So I think it's really important that we talk about this stuff." <<
notes 
august 2018
The biomass distribution on Earth | PNAS
"Earlier efforts to estimate global biomass have mostly focused on plants (3⇓–5). In parallel, a dominant role for prokaryotic biomass has been advocated in a landmark paper by Whitman et al. (6) entitled “Prokaryotes: The unseen majority.” New sampling and detection techniques (7, 8) make it possible to revisit this claim. Likewise, for other taxa, such as fish, recent global sampling campaigns (9) have resulted in updated estimates, often differing by an order of magnitude or more from previous estimates. For groups such as arthropods, global estimates are still lacking (10, 11)."

What there is respiring
notes 
july 2018
What now for the government? - BBC News
"One diplomat, in sorrow more than anger, last week said to me he simply couldn't see how the EU would be able to offer anything that the prime minister could get through Parliament. Yes, anything that is viable at all."

Hope the diplomat is wrong
notes 
july 2018
Debian User Forums • View topic - [SOLVED] startx not working in Stretch (with sysvinit-core)
Took a bit of time to find this one but allows me to run without dbus on devuan ascii
linux 
july 2018
The Trump Protests – The personal, the political, and the possible… – Slugger O'Toole
"Central to politics in the UK, over the last century (or so) has been how we, as a country, care for each other. What is personal, and what is the responsibility of the government? How we do we, as far as possible, try to ensure that no one gets left behind?"
notes 
july 2018
globalinequality: Bob Allen's new "poverty machine" and its implications
"...$PPP 1.90 poverty line was supposed to really reflect the same consumption opportunities (bundles) across the world. Mostly because of the differences in housing and clothing costs, but also in relative food prices, Allen shows that this line is broadly correct for African countries but that in Asia and in middle-income countries to achieve the same level of calorific intake, clothing, shelter you need between $PPP 2.50 and $PPP 3.50, and that in rich countries, you need about $PPP 4.50."

Housing costs extremely non-linear at low end. > £70 a week or a tent basically.
notes 
july 2018
Are Things Getting Better or Worse? | The New Yorker
"The power of bad news is magnified, Pinker writes, by a mental habit that psychologists call the “availability heuristic”: because people tend to estimate the probability of an event by means of “the ease with which instances come to mind,” they get the impression that mass shootings are more common than medical breakthroughs."

"One longs for a modern equivalent—a data-driven version of Fra Angelico’s “Last Judgment” or Hieronymus Bosch’s “Garden of Earthly Delights” equal to the contradictions of the human situation."
notes 
july 2018
What I Learned Working for Steve Ballmer – Ben Fathi – Medium
>> “The reason that God was able to create the world in seven days is that he didn’t have to worry about the installed base.” — Enzo Torresi. 1945–2016. <<

Windows joke - like it
notes 
july 2018
I Used A Phone Like Most People In The World And It Was Awful
"According to data from app analytics firm App Annie, Indians spend 36% of their screentime on communication (like WhatsApp), 20% on video players (like YouTube), and 16% on social networking (Facebook)."

Pretty much teenagers in UK with the addition of flash type games. Via HN
notes 
july 2018
Why Trump has few friends in Europe – POLITICO
>> “The politics of announcements is what unifies Trump, [Vladimir] Putin and [Italy’s Matteo] Salvini, who love to look very strong on social media and more in general to answer to people’s guts,” said Alli. <<

The politics of announcements - I like the phrase and will steal it.
notes 
july 2018
JIBLM.org - Journal of Inquiry-Based Learning in Mathematics - Download Item - Notes for a Course on Proofs by Jensen-Vallin, Jacqueline A.
"These notes are used for an introduction to proofs course including the following topics: logic, number theory, set theory, induction, and relations. In particular, the purpose of these notes is to help students learn how to critically examine their proofs and those presented by their classmates so that all students leave the class with a working knowledge of how to complete direct proofs, proofs by contrapositive, proofs by contradiction, and proofs by induction."

The proof book referred to below
notes 
july 2018
Free Proofs textbook
"This teaching style requires that students work directly with the mathematics. It is the core experience of the class. That is, this style shows students how to be, and in fact requires that they be, active learners. Consequently, it is a good fit for this course."

He calls it the Moore method - students do the proving basically.
notes 
july 2018
Random Points on a Sphere (Part 1) | Azimuth
"While trying to get a better intuition for this, I realized that as you go to higher and higher dimensions, and you standing at the north pole of the unit sphere, the chance that a randomly chosen other point is quite near the equator gets higher and higher!"

I've seen that before. Another reason to be very careful with statistical inference from smallish datasets with a lot of variables.
notes 
july 2018
The Children of Anaxagoras | Lapham’s Quarterly
"In recent years, some evolutionary biologists and neuroscientists have gone as far as to argue that the refinement of the toolmaking abilities in the earliest hominids could have accompanied or even allowed for the development of language. Proponents of this theory, including Aldo Faisal, a neuroscientist at Imperial College London, speculate that as early humans began working together to manufacture tools of increasing sophistication, they started communicating verbally in ways that were accordingly complex."
notes 
july 2018
Davis resigns. My part in his downfall. | Conservative Home
"So it was that the next evening we found ourselves chewing his choices over, almost literally, over Albondigas and Pisto Madrileno upstairs at Goya’s in Pimlico."

Personally, I sort of miss the days when these things were done over pints in the Dog. Ironic that the (no doubt excellent) restaurant serves a med menu.
notes 
july 2018
How to Make Anglo-Saxon Bread: Version 1 | The Early English Bread Project
"Oats and barley often grew together, and wheat and rye often grew together, so these mixtures make sense. It was advantageous to grow two kinds of grain together, so if one failed through disease or bad weather, the other kind might still produce, and you had a better chance of not starving."
notes 
july 2018
In home ownership push, Hong Kong leader Carrie Lam follows Singapore model of Lee Kuan Yew | South China Morning Post
"On June 29, she announced she would make subsidised ownership cheaper in Hong Kong. In every such project in future, 75 per cent of the flats would need to be affordable to those making the median income among all non-property-owning households. Being affordable means fixing mortgages at 40 per cent of income. This would bring flat prices down to about half the market rates, instead of the previous 30 per cent discount"

Median of the non-property owners. Presumably based on real income including part time/zero hours. Radical.
notes 
july 2018
FOOD & DRINK : HOW TO GO WITH THE GRAINS | The Independent
"This is Linda Collister's version of the delicious, crusty, chewy loaf made popular by the Poilane family in Paris."

3 days for the starter. 36 hours for the sponge, and two 8 hour rises for the dough. I'm going to have to try this one!
notes 
july 2018
Two Killed After Mooring Line Snaps at Port of Longview, Washington – gCaptain
"Bryon Jacobs, a father of three, was a 6th generation Longshoreman and worked for the ILWU at the Port of Longview for 16 years, his family said in a statement."

Despite all the modern logistics, a mooring cable can still break.
notes 
july 2018
CyberSquirrel1.com
Via The Register. Priceless
notes 
july 2018
Cory Doctorow: Zuck’s Empire of Oily Rags – Locus Online
"Remember that elections are generally knife-edge affairs, even for politicians who’ve held their seats for decades with slim margins: 60% of the vote is an excellent win. Remember, too, that the winner in most races is “none of the above,” with huge numbers of voters sitting out the election. If even a small number of these non-voters can be motivated to show up at the polls, safe seats can be made contestable. In a tight race, having a cheap way to reach all the latent Klansmen in a district and quietly inform them that Donald J. Trump is their man is a game-changer."

Via HN
notes 
july 2018
Trump Says ‘Abolish ICE’ Is Bad Politics For Democrats. Is He Right? | FiveThirtyEight
"The Trump administration has essentially made the policy of reducing immigration its security strategy. That was the argument for the travel ban and for separating families at the border. You also see that in the constant talk about MS-13. That’s part of why it was so interesting to people who focus on this stuff that the ICE investigators said that focus is hurting their ability to do homeland security work."
notes 
july 2018
The History Press | Bread: A slice of First World War history
Suggests several reasons for not selling bread fresh - this could ave had an impact on small bakers historically.
notes 
june 2018
National Loaf
The crucial question is: why were bakers not allowed to sell their loaves until the day after baking?
notes 
june 2018
The Brexit Short: How Hedge Funds Used Private Polls to Make Millions
"Hedge fund executives were among those on the line. If YouGov was conducting another poll before the vote, traders said, they’d be willing to pay vast sums for a heads-up just 30 minutes to an hour before publication, according to two knowledgeable sources. Since news of the poll alone likely would move markets, the survey’s accuracy was meaningless; traders simply needed to know the results before they became public."

That algorithmic thing again - advance knowledge can be used to make money
Notes 
june 2018
The Death of a Once Great City | Harper's Magazine
"As New York enters the third decade of the twenty-first century, it is in imminent danger of becoming something it has never been before: unremarkable. It is approaching a state where it is no longer a significant cultural entity but the world’s largest gated community, with a few cupcake shops here and there. For the first time in its history, New York is, well, boring."

Could this actually be true of most large cities?
notes 
june 2018
James Joyce - Wikiquote
"The pity is the public will demand and find a moral in my book — or worse they may take it in some more serious way, and on the honour of a gentleman, there is not one single serious line in it"

Bloomsday (a few days late on account of my right knee)
notes 
june 2018
The Quest to Break America’s Most Mysterious Code—And Find $60 Million in Buried Treasure | Mental Floss
“The computer is not the answer," Hammer said at a Beale Cipher Association Symposium in 1979. "Even if it does all the work, we still have to find the type of work for it to do.”
notes 
june 2018
Why We Shouldn’t Be Surprised at the Theranos Fraud
"Holmes met with a firm called MedVenture Associates in the early days of Theranos that had a lot of experience in medical technology and had invested in Abaxis. They were familiar with microfluidics and they asked her questions about how her envisioned technology was going to differ from Abaxis’. She didn’t even know that Abaxis had a device and she certainly didn’t understand how it worked. She got defensive at the probing questions and eventually left in a huff."
notes 
june 2018
FIU bridge that collapsed had key design mistake, experts say. | Miami Herald
"The faux cable-stayed bridge design created a highly irregular pattern for the diagonal struts. The irregular pattern, in turn, complicated the calculations for determining the stresses at different points and resulted in each of the 12 pieces being of different length and thickness, the three engineers who undertook a review of FIGG's calculations say."
maths 
june 2018
The borrowers: why Finland's cities are havens for library lovers | Cities | The Guardian
"According to local authority figures from 2016, the UK spends just £14.40 per head on libraries. By contrast, Finland spends £50.50 per inhabitant. While more than 478 libraries have closed in cities and towns across England, Wales and Scotland since 2010, Helsinki is spending €98m creating an enormous new one."

They take organised education pretty seriously as well
notes 
may 2018
‘Americans are Being Held Hostage and Terrorized by the Fringes’ - POLITICO Magazine
"There are basically two kinds of people in life: people who want to win competition and people who want to shut it down. People who don’t understand competition actually are the ones who want to shut it down because they don’t understand that competition requires rules. It requires moral precepts. Pepsi doesn’t want to go blow up the Coca-Cola bottling factory. It wants to take their customers fair and square for the better product and better pricing. The same thing should be true in American politics and policy."

Leaves out the effects of the algorithm: inevitable need for 'power structures' to implement a policy programme in a complex and interconnected set of institutions.

"It’s not like 50 percent of Americans thinks one thing and 50 percent thinks another thing. No, 15 percent on each side are effectively controlling the conversation and 70 percent of us don’t hate each other."

Parliamentary system?
notes 
may 2018
Opinion | Dalai Lama: Behind Our Anxiety, the Fear of Being Unneeded - The New York Times
"And yet, fewer among us are poor, fewer are hungry, fewer children are dying, and more men and women can read than ever before. In many countries, recognition of women’s and minority rights is now the norm. There is still much work to do, of course, but there is hope and there is progress.

How strange, then, to see such anger and great discontent in some of the world’s richest nations. In the United States, Britain and across the European Continent, people are convulsed with political frustration and anxiety about the future. Refugees and migrants clamor for the chance to live in these safe, prosperous countries, but those who already live in those promised lands report great uneasiness about their own futures that seems to border on hopelessness."
notes 
may 2018
Joseph Brodsky's trial
Brodsky felt his calling had a value beyond political expediency, while the judge was tasked with reminding him that the state needn’t subsidize his hobby if he wasn’t going to say anything useful. But the incommensurability of these points of view runs much deeper than this one case.
notes 
may 2018
‘What Happened to Alan Dershowitz?’ - POLITICO Magazine
"Around then, Dershowitz—never one to overlook a celebrity being railroaded—started getting more TV airtime for his argument that a sitting president could not be guilty of obstruction of justice."

As a limey, one immediately thinks 'Nixon'??
notes 
may 2018
Subscription hell | TechCrunch
"Take my colleague Connie Loizos’ article from yesterday reporting on a new venture fund. The text itself is about 3.5 kilobytes uncompressed, but the total payload of the page if nothing is cached is more than 10 MB, or more than 3000x the data usage of the actual text itself. This pattern has become so common that it has been called the website obesity crisis"
notes 
may 2018
Junior doctors' job offers withdrawn after blunder - BBC News
"Last week, the Royal College of Physicians (RCP) discovered a significant number of candidates were credited with the wrong score, because of an error transferring data from one computer programme to another - and may therefore have received an incorrect job offer."

Never retype data: don't you just love legacy systems
notes 
may 2018
The Gambler Who Cracked the Horse-Racing Code - Bloomberg
"Bill Benter did the impossible: He wrote an algorithm that couldn’t lose at the track. Close to a billion dollars later, he tells his story for the first time."

Sometimes you can win against the bookies
notes  statistics 
may 2018
'We're doomed': Mayer Hillman on the climate reality no one else will dare mention | Environment | The Guardian
>> “With doom ahead, making a case for cycling as the primary mode of transport is almost irrelevant,” he says. “We’ve got to stop burning fossil fuels. So many aspects of life depend on fossil fuels, except for music and love and education and happiness. These things, which hardly use fossil fuels, are what we must focus on.” <<
notes 
april 2018
Can’t sleep? Tell yourself it’s not a big deal | Oliver Burkeman | Life and style | The Guardian
>> "In a review of the research published last year, Lichstein concluded that “non-complaining poor sleepers” – who sleep badly but don’t define themselves as insomniacs – don’t suffer the high blood pressure commonly associated with severe sleeplessness. Meanwhile, “complaining good sleepers” – who get enough shut-eye, but are heavily invested in their alleged insomnia – were essentially as tired, anxious and depressed as those who genuinely didn’t sleep." <<

Basically stay positive
notes 
april 2018
LEM - SCIENCE FICTION'S PASSIONATE REALIST - review - NYTimes.com
>> ''What would happen to us if we could truly sympathize with others, feel with them, suffer for them? The fact that human anguish, fear, and suffering melt away with the death of the individual, that nothing remains of the ascents, the declines, the orgasms, and the agonies, is a praiseworthy gift of evolution, which made us like the animals. If from every unfortunate, from every victim, there remained even a single atom of his feelings, if thus grew the inheritance of the generations, if even a spark could pass from man to man, the world would be full of raw, bowel-torn howling.'' <<

Last paragraph of *His Master's Voice*
notes 
april 2018
Solved: A Decades-Old Ansel Adams Mystery - Atlas Obscura
"Donald Olson sees all that and something else: a mystery. He wants to know the moment it was taken. An astrophysicist and forensic astronomer, Olson uses quantitative methods to answer questions raised by artwork, literature, and historical accounts—not the heady ones, but the basic, surprisingly slippery who, what, when, and where."

Reverse search on Sun's position
notes 
april 2018
Alien Pastures » Fun and games in -current when ABIs break
"Among others, an ABI depends on the machine architecture, and on the toolchain (compiler, linker) used to generate the binary code from its sources. An ABI guarantees binary compatibility: the program will work on every machine with the same ABI, without a need for recompilation."

And somehow something the upstream provider puts in the source code so poppler/icu4c both change the soname so often
linux 
april 2018
The Artificial Intelligentsia | Aaron Timms
"The story of Silicon Valley is as much about donkeys as unicorns, entrepretendeurs as entrepreneurs. Like all good stories, this story has the capacity to surprise. Many of the tech industry’s most memorable flops were at one point seen as great successes."

So when the great and the good give their recipes for success, think 'survivor bias'

notes
notes 
april 2018
The Plunging Morale of America’s Service Members - The Atlantic
>> Decaul now has a playwriting fellowship at Brown University, where he assures me that racial dialogue happens very differently than it did in the Corps. But thinking back, he told me, “No one, including me, was offended. Everyone thought it was hilarious.” The party continued, and the deployment followed without incident. The last Decaul heard of J. was recently, when he got a Facebook notification that J. wanted to “friend” him. “I turned him down,” Maurice told me. “I thought, I’ve had enough of you, J.” <<

Keep an eye out for this guy's plays
notes 
april 2018
Yeast Came From China - The Atlantic
"The out-of-China hypothesis for yeast is not so different from the out-of-Africa hypothesis for humans. Among Homo sapiens, Africa has the most genetic diversity of anywhere on Earth. All humans elsewhere descend from populations that came out of Africa; all yeast elsewhere descend from strains that came out of East Asia. Once wild yeast strains made it out of Asia, humans likely domesticated them several times to make the yeasty foods that we know: beer, bread, wine."
notes 
april 2018
Rick Scott vs. Bill Nelson: 2018’s Florida Senate race, explained - Vox
"He is worth about $150 million, according to the most recent estimates, after making his money as a hospital executive."

Just trying to work out how you can make $1.5 x 10^8 dollars running a hospital...
notes 
april 2018
Want to Be Happy? Think Like an Old Person - The New York Times
>> For now, he said, “I’m thinking about resistance. What does it mean, resistance? What kind of resistance do we need today? Technology is now being used, much of it, for negative purposes. So to resist all what is happening negatively in humanity or technology is to develop the — O.K., this banal word, spiritual aspect.” <<

Perhaps we all *need* to be Jonas Mekas now.
notes 
april 2018
Northern and Midlands trainee teachers 'told to change their accents' - BBC News
"The Department for Education told Newsbeat they would not comment on the issue."

Says it all really
notes 
april 2018
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