Linus Torvalds: “Somebody is pushing complete garbage for unclear reasons.” | Hacker News
"The most striking thing here is that Linus has apparently dismissed incompetence as a rational explanation. Yes, he is often brash, but usually he is accusing someone of sheer stupidity. He does not do that here. Linus alleges that we are being lied to - that we don’t know the full story, nor Intel’s motives."

This gets worse
notes  linux 
12 hours ago
Linux-Kernel Archive: Re: [RFC 09/10] x86/enter: Create macros to restrict/unrestrict Indirect Branch Speculation
"So somebody isn't telling the truth here. Somebody is pushing complete
garbage for unclear reasons. Sorry for having to point that out."

This whole thing is a bit odd.
notes  linux 
12 hours ago
20 Years of LWN [LWN.net]
"not big and professional like the real press" ;-}
notes 
yesterday
Here’s why you can’t buy a high-end graphics card at Best Buy | Ars Technica
"But the rise of cryptocurrency mining has created an unprecedented global shortage of graphics cards. If you go to your local retailer, you're likely to find bare shelves where the beefier cards used to be. Instead of trading at a discount, used cards routinely sell for well above MSRP on sites like eBay and Craigslist."

These things use quite a lot of electricity as well. Proof of work is basically a waste of power.
notes 
2 days ago
FOSDEM 2018 - Interview with Michael Meeks<br/>Re-structuring a giant, ancient code-base for new platforms. Making LibreOffice work well everywhere.
"When you look at the cumulative effect of seven years of aggressively paying back a national-debt sized technical debt, we are in an amazingly better place - it makes me cringe mentally to consider working on or even reading the old code; yet still there is plenty more to do."

Interesting stuff. BUT the 'old code' (i.e. openoffice) actually runs quite well and has less confusing UI changes...
notes 
4 days ago
Unmasking American Legend D.B. Cooper, Who Got Away With Hijacking a Plane -- New York Magazine
"Porteous looked at the envelope. He studied the return address. Morris, Minnesota. He looked at a map. The town was two hours from Fargo, North Dakota. Population: 5,200. He opened the letter, and after peering inside for powders, he read it. It barely made sense. It was a rambling confession of finding the answer to a “famous unsolved caper” that would make a great movie—and one only Ephron could direct, because she had “heart.” She could call this movie Bashful in Seattle—because the main character in the caper lived near Seattle. Skipp thought, Strange, yes; dangerous, no. So he hailed a cab, rode over to Ephron’s building on East 79th, and left the letter with her doorman. Ephron got the letter. She opened it and looked at it and put it down on the kitchen counter. It stayed there for some time. Then it disappeared. “I don’t know what happened to it,” she says."
notes 
5 days ago
Jaron Lanier interview: on VR, LSD, and where Silicon Valley went wrong - Vox
90Mb download, 96 minutes of my favourite Windows user speaking about stuff.
notes 
7 days ago
Black Death 'spread by humans not rats' | Hacker News
Discussion about a fairly recondite research paper and the issues around popularizing science. One of the authors of the paper is taking part.
notes 
7 days ago
How to Turn a Red State Purple (Democrats Not Required) - POLITICO Magazine
"Under Hammond, Alaska also amended its constitution to create the Alaska Permanent Fund, which invests oil revenue for future generations. In 1982, the state began paying every resident the Permanent Fund Dividend, which is determined by a formula that relies on the fund’s income over the last five years. At its low point, in 1984, the dividend was $331.29 per person, and it peaked in 2015 at $2,072—meaning a family of four could expect a check from the state worth nearly $8,300."

We got high house prices and tax breaks for rich people thanks to Maggie.
notes 
11 days ago
It’s not just the Brexit border question that divides Ireland. It’s imagination | Matthew O’Toole | Opinion | The Guardian
"As Bradley will discover, Brexit has unsettled one of the most intangible but important features of the fraying Northern Ireland settlement: the ability of its citizens to imagine themselves into different nationalities. This is why the border question is so difficult: it is about psychology as much as the practical mechanics of border controls. How does anyone know what nationality they are? Do they belong to the country to which they pay taxes, or whose football team they support?"

Via Slugger
notes 
11 days ago
Improving Ourselves to Death | The New Yorker
"Carl Cederström and André Spicer, business-school professors in a field called “organization studies,” set out to do all that and more in their recent book, “Desperately Seeking Self-Improvement: A Year Inside the Optimization Movement” (OR Books), a comically committed exploration of current life-hacking wisdom in areas ranging from athletic and intellectual prowess to spirituality, creativity, wealth, and pleasure."

Personally, I think the Danes have this one sowed up.
notes 
11 days ago
Legends of the Ancient Web
Radio as social media? Via HN
notes 
14 days ago
Vintage Verification | Nuclear Futures Laboratory
"We pursue a fundamentally different approach: Our prototype of an inspection system uses vintage hardware built around a 6502 processor. The processor uses 8-micron technology (about 600 times larger than current 14-nanometer technology) and has only about 3500 transistors. Vintage hardware may have a number of important advantages for applications where two parties need to simultaneously establish trust in the hardware used. CPUs designed in the distant past, at a time when their use for sensitive measurements was never envisioned, drastically reduce concerns that the other party implemented backdoors or hidden switches on the hardware level. "

Interesting approach - didn't see that one coming
notes 
16 days ago
User Interfaces: How Not to Design a Microwave
"Every UI principle I’ve learnt can be derived from the following statement: Good user interface design minimizes the friction between a user and the task they aim to achieve. In other words, well designed software makes it easy to achieve a task."

Looks interesting and well written. The trouble starts when you need to provide an interface that supports a wide range of tasks and which supports a range of user knowledge (e.g. beginner to guru).
notes 
16 days ago
'Re: Meltdown, aka "Dear Intel, you suck"' - MARC
"Some people should be ashamed of themselves, but they probably purchased options."

Got it.
notes 
17 days ago
'Meltdown, aka "Dear Intel, you suck"' - MARC
"Personally, I do find it....amusing? that public announcements were moved up after the issue was deduced from development discussions and commits to a different open source OS project. Aren't we all glad that this was under embargo and strongly believe in the future value of embargoes?"

A commendable degree of understatement
notes 
17 days ago
Clydach Vale walker Trevor Ward turns 104 on birthday weekend - BBC News
>> "I go for a walk every day up to the lake. I'll go to the top of the road and meet my butty [friend] and we'll talk about everything and everyone and then [go] back down," he said. <<

Here's betting the lake is a couple or six miles up the hill
notes 
17 days ago
Why Raspberry Pi isn't vulnerable to Spectre or Meltdown - Raspberry Pi
Simple explanation of speculative processing and of instruction caches, and why the Raspberry PI isn't vulnerable to Spectre or Meltdown
notes 
18 days ago
Holyhead will be one of the biggest losers from Brexit
"There is simply no space in or around the port for the kind of infrastructure that will be required to process the number of lorries and trailers that currently pass through it. A hard border in Holyhead can only yield chaos."

Contrast with informal cross-channel arrangements from Normandy local government and Kent/Essex &c. Via Slugger
notes 
18 days ago
Documents Reveal the Complex Legacy of James Angleton, CIA Counterintelligence Chief and Godfather of Mass Surveillance
"With his porkpie hat and trenchcoat, the portly Cram bore a passing resemblance to George Smiley, the fictional British spymaster as played by Alec Guinness in the BBC’s production of John le Carré’s classic “Smiley’s People.” There was some professional similarity as well. In le Carré’s novels, Smiley is introduced as a veteran counterintelligence officer called on by his superiors to assess a covert operation gone disastrously wrong. He is drawn into a hunt for a mole in the British intelligence service."

I fancy a porkpie hat
notes 
21 days ago
Vincent's blog
Lumina stuff for OpenBSD
notes 
21 days ago
Spotting Field Sabotage in Meetings – What's the PONT
>> "Insist on doing everything through “channels.” Never permit short-cuts to be taken in order to expedite decisions.
Make “speeches.” Talk as frequently as possible and at great length. Illustrate your “points” by long anecdotes and accounts of personal experiences. Never hesitate to make a few appropriate “patriotic” comments.
When possible, refer all matters to committees, for “further study and consideration.” Attempt to make the committees as large as possible — never less than five.
Bring up irrelevant issues as frequently as possible.
Haggle over precise wordings of communications, minutes, resolutions.
Refer back to matters decided upon at the last meeting and attempt to re-open the question of the advisability of that decision.
Advocate “caution.” Be“reasonable” and urge your fellow-conferees to be “reasonable” and avoid haste which might result in embarrassments or difficulties later on.
Be worried about the propriety of any decision — raise the question of whether such action as is contemplated lies within the jurisdiction of the group or whether it might conflict with the policy of some higher echelon." <<

I really need to make sure I do the *opposite* of these things. Via HN.
notes 
22 days ago
Does the White Working Class Really Vote Against Its Own Interests? - POLITICO Magazine
"The vast majority of farmers, black and white, were tenants or sharecroppers, and repressive poll taxes disenfranchised not just black men and women, but also poor white people. Designed by wealthy plantation owners and industrialists, the poll tax was expressly a class measure, meant to preserve the region’s prevailing low-tax, low-wage, low-service economy. It was more ingenious and insidious than many people today realize. In Mississippi and Virginia, it was cumulative for two years; if a tenant farmer or textile worker couldn’t pay in any given year, not only did he miss an election cycle, he had to pay a full two years’ tax to restore his voting rights. In Georgia, the poll tax was cumulative from the time a voter turned 21 years old—meaning, if one missed 10 years, he or she would have to pay a decade’s worth of back taxes before regaining the right to vote. In Texas, the tax was due on February 1, in the winter off-season, when farmers were habitually strapped for cash. It was, as one Southern liberal observed at the time, “like buying a ticket to a show nine months ahead of time, and before you know who’s playing, or really what the thing is all about.”"

The franchise
notes 
23 days ago
Sue Grafton - Wikipedia
"This exercise led to her best-known works, a chronological series of mystery novels. Known as "the alphabet novels," the stories are set in and around the fictional town of Santa Teresa, California. It is based on Santa Barbara, outside of which Grafton maintained a home in the suburb of Montecito. (Grafton chose to use the name Santa Teresa as a tribute to the author Ross Macdonald, who had used it as a fictional name for Santa Barbara in his own novels.)"

Shades of Georges Perec - the need for a structure and constraints
notes 
24 days ago
American reams: why a ‘paperless world’ still hasn’t happened | News | The Guardian
“If man may now be considered as having reached a high state of civilisation, his gradual development is more directly due to the inventions of paper and printing than to all other factors.”

Something to ponder as you shred all the old bills...
notes 
25 days ago
A theoretical physics FAQ
"Most topics are related to quantum mechanics, quantum field theory, renormalization, the measurement problem, randomness, and philosophical issues in physics. Since different sections were written at different times (some date back to the last century), there is some overlap in the treatment of topics, and a few are a bit outdated."
notes 
26 days ago
politicalbetting.com » Blog Archive » Alastair Meeks and his predictions for 2018
"Jeremy Corbyn is of an age where he might consider that he could hand over to someone younger and spend more time with his manhole covers."
notes 
26 days ago
A City Is Not a Computer
"This seems an obvious truth, but we need to say it loud and clear. Urban intelligence is more than information processing."

Via 538
notes 
27 days ago
Doug Jones’s Alabama win: the inside story of how it happened - Vox
"The key to us having a chance was to detribalize the politics of the state. If Alabama was reacting to the tribal politics of our times, there was no way for us to win. And in a weird way, the allegations created tribalism again. You either believe the charges or you don't believe the charges. Suddenly, we're back into Republicans who don't believe the charges; it's the media out to get Roy Moore. He's able to start tribalizing the race. Trump begins coming in with him. And every time that happened, Roy Moore would open a lead."
notes 
27 days ago
Meet Walter Pitts, the Homeless Genius Who Revolutionized Artificial Intelligence
Feeds into Neumann's design for the computer and based on Russell/Whitehead.
notes 
4 weeks ago
The Screenless Office
Good heavens. I was doing this with a teletypewriter in the 70s. It wasn't *great*.
notes 
5 weeks ago
In Raising the World’s I.Q., the Secret’s in the Salt - The New York Times
"In fact, Kazakhstan has become an example of how even a vast and still-developing nation like this Central Asian country can achieve a remarkable public health success. In 1999, only 29 percent of its households were using iodized salt. Now, 94 percent are. Next year, the United Nations is expected to certify it officially free of iodine deficiency disorders."

Iodine: cheap and simple chemical
notes 
5 weeks ago
Innovation is overvalued. Maintenance often matters more | Aeon Essays
"We can think of labour that goes into maintenance and repair as the work of the maintainers, those individuals whose work keeps ordinary existence going rather than introducing novel things. Brief reflection demonstrates that the vast majority of human labour, from laundry and trash removal to janitorial work and food preparation, is of this type: upkeep. This realisation has significant implications for gender relations in and around technology. Feminist theorists have long argued that obsessions with technological novelty obscures all of the labour, including housework, that women, disproportionately, do to keep life on track. Domestic labour has huge financial ramifications but largely falls outside economic accounting, like Gross Domestic Product."
notes 
6 weeks ago
Is there data on the quality of management decisions?
"One specific lower-level reason “obviously” non-optimal decisions can persist for so long is that there’s a lot of noise in team results. You sometimes see a manager make some radical decisions (not necessarily statistics-driven), followed by some poor results, causing management to fire the manager. There’s so much volatility that you can’t really judge players or managers based on small samples, but this doesn’t stop people from doing so. The combination of volatility and skepticism of radical ideas heavily disincentivizes going against conventional wisdom."

The inverse effect springs to mind as well: new teaching idea gets 'suggested' and credited with any increase in pass rate.
notes 
7 weeks ago
#Brexit: the DUP and the Risks of Not Passing Go | Slugger O'Toole
"The DUP torpedoed today’s sensible UK-EU compromise deal on the border because, according to an Arlene Foster tweet, the party could not accept any deal which separates Northern Ireland politically from the rest of the UK. This will come as a great surprise to campaigners for marriage equality, liberalisation of the abortion laws, and comprehensive education"
notes 
7 weeks ago
Algorithmic Bias? An Empirical Study into Apparent Gender-Based Discrimination in the Display of STEM Career Ads by Anja Lambrecht, Catherine Tucker :: SSRN
"We explore data from a field test of how an algorithm delivered ads promoting job opportunities in the Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) fields. This ad was explicitly intended to be gender-neutral in its delivery. Empirically, however, fewer women saw the ad than men. This happened because younger women are a prized demographic and are more expensive to show ads to. An algorithm which simply optimizes cost-effective ad delivery will deliver ads that were intended to be gender-neutral in an apparently discriminatory way, due to crowding out. We show that this empirical regularity extends to other major digital platforms."

Downsides... via The Register
notes 
7 weeks ago
After 37 years, Voyager has fired up its trajectory thrusters | Hacker News
"I’m currently travelling at about 180mph on board a high-speed train in Japan. I flew here on a jet which is something like 20% more efficient than the equivalent from a few years ago. Using the ubiquitous LTE network, I can make a real-time HD video call to my family back in the UK, using my palm-sized, battery-powered computer. I used the same device earlier to do some research about cities as we passed through them, and also to check the CCTV system at home. Over the past couple of weeks I’ve used a similar technology stack to locate my position to meter-level accuracy, to read and translate foreign language text from images in real time, and to record hours of 4K video."

The upside
notes 
7 weeks ago
Why I leave hidden messages in High Street clothes - BBC News
>> "What it taught me about campaigning was that to 'win' a campaign you didn't have to protest publicly like a performance, you don't always need petitions signed," she says. "It made me see campaigning as much broader and creative than we often think." <<

Protest, civil disobedience and direct action. The latter can be quieter and often more constructive.
notes 
7 weeks ago
The legacies of 1917 – Eurozine
"You could have had, as some in the Bolshevik Party, in the Left-Menshevik wings, were thinking, a combination of local soviet-style structures with a national parliament."
notes 
7 weeks ago
Conservatives probably can’t be persuaded on climate change. So now what? - Vox
""The conventional wisdom gets the causal arrow backwards," says Mullin. People don’t develop political and policy opinions based on an assessment of climate science. They assess climate science based on preexisting political and policy opinions. That’s why trying to change minds with science-based arguments is so rarely effective.""
notes 
10 weeks ago
On the phenomenon of bullshit jobs - David Graeber
"...technology has been marshaled, if anything, to figure out ways to make us all work more. In order to achieve this, jobs have had to be created that are, effectively, pointless. Huge swathes of people, in Europe and North America in particular, spend their entire working lives performing tasks they secretly believe do not really need to be performed. The moral and spiritual damage that comes from this situation is profound. It is a scar across our collective soul. Yet virtually no one talks about it."
notes 
september 2017
How to get good font rendering in Void Linux | Bruno Miguel
Just using stock freetype > 2.8 and the supplied config files. May try it on Slackie current
linux 
august 2017
What a Physicist Sees When She Looks at a Fancy Gown - Racked
"People rarely think about the engineering of gala gowns, or of fashion at all. This is part of a larger problem of treating traditionally feminine interests as non-science-related. Baking is practical chemistry, knitting is manual programming, makeup is about crafting optical illusions, and adjusting pattern sizes relies on algebra."
maths 
august 2017
Interview with David Graeber - The White ReviewThe White Review
"[My father] lived in Barcelona at a time it was run on anarchist principles and he would always tell me these fun stories about it. He always said Barcelona was one of the greatest experiments in world history, because what we discovered there was that white-collar workers don’t actually do anything. In Barcelona their idea of having a revolution was to get rid of all the managers and just carry on without them. And nothing really changed."
notes 
august 2017
GCSE: Pass rate dips as students face tougher exams - BBC News
"But the exams regulator Ofqual says a pass or grade 4 in maths would have been achieved in the upper tier paper with just 18% of the overall marks."

Hummmm - won't that encourage schools to enter students for Higher and coach them on the easy bits? This was one of the things Gove did the reforms to avoid.
notes  maths 
august 2017
Tokyo, urban design and mental health - Journal of Urban Design and Mental Health - Centre for Urban Design and Mental Health
"Shinrin yoku, is a term developed by the Japanese Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry, and Fisheries in 1982 to describe a therapeutic health practice that aims to boost immunity, reduce stress, and promote wellbeing. Shinrin yoku is often called ‘forest bathing’ but more literally means ‘taking in the forest atmosphere’ – the opportunity for city dwellers to spend leisurely time in the forest without any distractions. Japanese research has found associations between this nature immersion and improvements in physiological and psychological indicators of stress, mood hostility, fatigue, confusion and vitality (Park et al, 2010)."
notes  places 
august 2017
Constant Anxiety Won't Save the World - The Atlantic
>> "I would have thought that constant vigilance wouldn’t really be possible. But Scott Woodruff, the director of the anxiety and obsessive-compulsive treatment program at the American Institute for Cognitive Therapy, told me I’d be surprised. “The anxious mind and the worried mind can manage to bring back topics over and over again,” he says. “It is possible that people can really spend quite an amount of time every day worrying about world events.”" <<

Talking to people around you is the answer. We seem to 'anchor' to the people we interact with most. So make most interactions local.
notes 
august 2017
Is Garry Kasparov Too Old To Dominate Chess Again? | FiveThirtyEight
"The result is shaped like a large floating apostrophe of mortality. After a steep increase in players’ early years (youth is wasted on the young), the estimated trend in ratings peaks just after age 38, before beginning a long, slow, irreversible and depressing decline (kinda like real life)."

R^2 on that dust cloud can't be that high!
notes  stats 
august 2017
The Great American Bubble Machine - Rolling Stone
"The world's most powerful investment bank is a great vampire squid wrapped around the face of humanity, relentlessly jamming its blood funnel into anything that smells like money."

Matt Taibbi - almost but not quite the new HST
notes 
august 2017
“It’s just an embarrassing spectacle at this point”: Matt Taibbi on Trump’s America - Vox
"I know this will sound weird, but I actually thought Trump’s victory was a kind of triumph of American democracy. I mean, I’m completely opposed to everything that Trump believes in. But the notion that somebody completely outside the American political system, who had virtually no institutional support from either of the two parties, could actually win the presidency is something that I wouldn't have believed eight years ago. So I took his election as a sign that our democracy was functioning correctly."

Book ordered. I still wish HST was still around
notes 
august 2017
Military to Trump: we won’t ban transgender service members just because you tweeted about it - Vox
“We don’t have guidance. We have a tweet. We don’t execute policy based on a tweet.” Capt. Jeff Davis, DoD [spokesman]

Nice to see candid responses
notes 
july 2017
For Obamacare enrollees, Obamacare repeal is already real - Vox
>> “I don’t have intensive needs — I’m 39, I’m not planning to get pregnant — but that is a thing that could happen,” she says. “Still, I feel like I need coverage. I’ve watched people go through terrible things when they didn’t have insurance. I’m just risk-averse and don’t want to go without coverage.” <<

For all the NHS's faults, I hope we keep the safety net. I can't imagine the effect of having to worry about healthcare when starting up a small business given the impact of small businesses on most economies
notes 
july 2017
10,000 Hours With Claude Shannon: How A Genius Thinks, Works, and Lives
"His mind was a heat-seeking missile targeting problems. What got him up in the morning was dissecting how things worked, not digressions into creativity and productivity."
notes 
july 2017
BBC - Future - How Tibetans survive life on the ‘roof of the world’
"Our differences are slight and are held at the surface. Under the skin, deep in our DNA, we are nearly identical. From this sea of similarity, important genetic changes between populations can be seen as small but steep islands breaking the surface of the genome. But after looking more closely at the EPAS1 gene from the Tibetan genomes, Nielsen not only found it was a steep change, but it was a unique one too. After searching through the aptly named 1,000 Genomes Project, he couldn’t find anything quite like it elsewhere. “The DNA sequence that we saw in Tibetans was simply too different,” Nielsen says."

Remarkable. Via HN from Medium
notes 
july 2017
Don’t Compare Trump to Nixon. It’s Unfair to Nixon. - POLITICO Magazine
"Are we right to analogize the tarnished ending of the two-term Nixon presidency—with its historic accomplishments, as well as sordid tapes and long list of criminal convictions—with a chaos-engulfed Trump presidency that has not even been able to staff up, has no significant legislative wins to its name and is already, at just six months in as of this week, the most unpopular in seven decades?"

Harsh... but accurate (Nixon was re-elected in a landslide)
notes 
july 2017
[CentOS] Thanks to every one
"It is crucial for long running calculations that you
have a stable OS - you have never seen wrath like a computational
scientist whose 200 day calculation has just failed because you needed
to reboot the node it was running on."

In my day we wrote a tape, but then again the program was on punched cards.
notes  linux 
july 2017
Reality Check: Is public sector pay higher than private sector? - BBC News
"The point about qualifications is important, because jobs in the public sector tend to require higher qualifications. Also, there has been a tendency for public sector bodies to outsource lower-paid functions such as cleaning and catering to contractors, which moves them from the public to the private sector. Doing so on a large scale would increase average earnings in the public sector."
notes  statistics 
july 2017
The computer poetry of J. M. Coetzee’s early programming career | Cultural Compass
"How do you read code? What is the “text” of a program—the machine code, the high-level programming, or the output it generates? How do you preserve an electronic file and how should the scholar access it?"
algorithm 
july 2017
Unhappy meals
"Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants."
notes 
july 2017
Eat the Seasons
Nice idea but is the production volume there?
notes 
july 2017
Gambiarra: repair culture | efeefe
"Of course, a repair culture isn't about repairing things only. We could try to find a better way to define a culture of reuse, repair and re-purposing. But proposing repair - the physical act of mending things in order to extend their lifetime or else turning them into something else of use - as a core value sounds good enough for a current need: criticizing the path apparently taken by maker culture that is addicted to novelty, becoming consequently toxic, unsustainable, superficial and alienating."

Or repairing stuff could just be useful :-)
notes 
july 2017
How to See What the Internet Knows About You (And How to Stop It) - The New York Times
>> "The relentlessly unyielding (but highly profitable) personalization of the products and services we use is getting deeper and creepier than ever. This type of data is incredibly valuable, we’re producing a ton of it every day, and it’s all being used to turn us into products. As one Facebook developer famously said: “The best minds of my generation are thinking about how to make people click ads.”" <<
notes  algorithm 
july 2017
The language of programming
"I won’t lie, this looks outrageous even to me. But not to my Dad, who is a civil engineer and doesn’t speak a word of English. He is dangerously fluent in Excel’s formulas, which he uses extensively in those hundred-sheet documents bristling with filters, conditionals, and pivot tables. Then the roads and bridges are getting built based on those calculations. He doesn’t know what IF means, but he uses ЕСЛИ all the time. What’s amazing is that if he emailed you one of his spreadsheets and you happened to open it in your “real deal” MS Excel, every formula would appear in English, but work just as he intended."

Three cheers for the spreadsheet - one of the longest lasting end-user programming metaphors we have
notes  algorithm 
july 2017
10 charts that show the effect of tuition fees - BBC News
"But the biggest change, often overlooked, has been the collapse in part-time students.

These were often adults with other responsibilities who were more sensitive to increased costs."

350k to 150k in status (remember there is a 6 year lead when taking a degree part time)
notes  statistics 
july 2017
How Nature Solves Problems Through Computation | Quanta Magazine
>> "Like flocking or schooling, the policing behavior arises from individual interactions to produce a macroscopic effect on the entire ensemble. But it is subtler, perhaps harder to visualize and measure. Or, as Flack says of macaque society and many of the other systems she studies, “their metric space is a social coordinate space. It’s not Euclidean.”" <<
maths 
july 2017
A big international meeting is exposing a Trump-sized rift between the US and its allies - Vox
"In a certain sense, Trump — who campaigned as a historically talented dealmaker — has ironically been the anti-deal president. It’s not just that he hasn’t struck a single major agreements with a foreign power; it’s that he has called into question many previous ones — leading American allies to wonder just how much they can trust America’s commitment to the entire international order."
notes 
july 2017
Trump is preparing to meet Putin this week by reading tweet-length memos - Vox
"...Trump is preparing for his biggest foreign meeting with the leader of a country that actively tried to undermine America’s democratic process, a leader who sees the US as his personal enemy, by reading tweet-length talking points."

What could possibly go wrong?
notes 
july 2017
A near-disaster at a federal nuclear weapons laboratory takes a hidden toll on America’s arsenal | Science | AAAS
"In a hi-tech testing and manufacturing building pivotal to sustaining America’s nuclear arsenal, [technicians] gathered eight rods painstakingly crafted out of plutonium, and positioned them side-by-side on a table to photograph how nice they looked."
...
"The technicians’ improvised photo-op, an internal Energy Department report concluded later, revealed the staff had become “de-sensitized” to the risk of a serious accident"

Potential Darwin Award winners! De-sensitisation is a theme with people who get lucky most of the time until they don't.
notes 
june 2017
www.trumptwitterarchive.com
json data feed for all of #realdonaldtrump's ruminations. For the ages.
notes 
june 2017
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