How do I make Chrome auto-fill a double last name? - Google Product Forums
You could consider inserting a non-breaking space into your surname.

1. Find a Unicode encoder/decoder online, for example this
2. Insert your name as text and convert it to a unicode string. Taking your example "Leonard James Akaar" will be converted into "Leonard%20James%20Akaar"
3. Change the last space (Unicode %20) to a non-breaking space (Unicode %A0). The result will look like this "Leonard%20James%A0Akaar"
4. Convert it back to text. You will see "Leonard James Akaar" again, but this time the first and the second space are different characters, and the autofiller will recognize "James Akaar" as a single word.
5. Copy the text you obtained
6. Open settings -> advanced -> passwords and forms -> autofill settings -> edit. Replace your name with the edited one.
howto  chrome  Google  browser  autofill  forms  i18n  cultural  Web 
8 weeks ago
Chicken Udon Bowl with Zucchini Noodles Recipe - EatingWell
EatingWell recipes low_calories spiralizer noodles
10 weeks ago
· C · visualisation
Perceptual uniform color scales for scientific visualizations
color_palette  color_scale  visualization  infovis  scientific  broc  perceptual 
12 weeks ago
How to Apply for SENTRI | U.S. Customs and Border Protection
Could be used to get TSA Precheck status. But need to go for interview and only places are in AZ, TX, and CA.
travel  CBP  TSA 
april 2018
Mark Zuckerberg on Facebook’s future, fake news, and Russian mischief - Vox
You mentioned our governance. One of the things that I feel really lucky we have is this company structure where, at the end of the day, it’s a controlled company. We are not at the whims of short-term shareholders. We can really design these products and decisions with what is going to be in the best interest of the community over time.
facebook  Zuckerberg  Klein_E  governance  online  communities 
april 2018
When does Russian propaganda work — and when does it backfire? Here’s what we found. - The Washington Post
Assuming that Russia knows how its propaganda affects its audience, we might be able to figure out what it was trying to do in the U.S. election. If Russia targeted voters predisposed toward Trump, trying to motivate them to vote, that would suggest its goal was to help him get elected. But if Russia spread its biased messages broadly, that would suggest its goal was increasing U.S. political polarization, making it harder for U.S. democracy to function smoothly.
Russia  propaganda  disinformation  misinformation  bots  Ukraine  2016_US_Presidential  Elections 
april 2018
Peter Thiel Employee Helped Cambridge Analytica Before It Harvested Data - The New York Times
This seems to contradict earlier accounts (see Motherboard Vice) according to which Kosinski was contacted by Kogan in behalf of SCL. Here it seems instead that Cambridge Analytica/SCL contacted Kogan *after* trying (and failing) to strike a deal with Kosinski.
michal_kosinski  aleksandr_kogan  shady  cambridge_analytica  palantir 
march 2018
The Data That Turned the World Upside Down - Motherboard
Around this time, in early 2014, Kosinski was approached by a young assistant professor in the psychology department called Aleksandr Kogan. He said he was inquiring on behalf of a company that was interested in Kosinski's method, and wanted to access the MyPersonality database. Kogan wasn't at liberty to reveal for what purpose; he was bound to secrecy.

At first, Kosinski and his team considered this offer, as it would mean a great deal of money for the institute, but then he hesitated. Finally, Kosinski remembers, Kogan revealed the name of the company: SCL, or Strategic Communication Laboratories. Kosinski Googled the company: "[We are] the premier election management agency," says the company's website. SCL provides marketing based on psychological modeling. One of its core focuses: Influencing elections. Influencing elections? Perturbed, Kosinski clicked through the pages. What kind of company was this? And what were these people planning?

What Kosinski did not know at the time: SCL is the parent of a group of companies. Who exactly owns SCL and its diverse branches is unclear, thanks to a convoluted corporate structure, the type seen in the UK Companies House, the Panama Papers, and the Delaware company registry. Some of the SCL offshoots have been involved in elections from
michal_kosinski  cambridge_analytica  aleksandr_kogan  cambridge  shady 
march 2018
Bison One-Pot Dinner
Con la quinoa è la morte sua!

We substituted shallots for onion and halved the amount of stock and added pre-cooked tomato sauce (with olive oil and garlic).
recipe  bison  one_pot  cooking  food 
march 2018
Air France Flight 447 Crash Causes in Part Point to Automation Paradox - IEEE Spectrum
Many of the recommendations also deal with the so-called “automation paradox,” i.e., which as I wrote about for IEEE Spectrum concerns the situation where “the more reliable the automation, the less the human operator may be able to contribute to that success. Consequently, operators are increasingly left out of the loop, at least until something unexpected happens. Then the operators need to get involved quickly and flawlessly.”
march 2018
Automated to Death - IEEE Spectrum
The most obvious connection is wrt self-driving cars, but I can see some analogies with automation in news consumption here as well...
march 2018
Tech Giants, Once Seen as Saviors, Are Now Viewed as Threats - The New York Times
Criticism of tech is nothing new, of course. In a Newsweek jeremiad in 1995 titled “Why the Web Won’t Be Nirvana,” the astronomer Clifford Stoll pointed out that “every voice can be heard cheaply and instantly” on the Usenet bulletin boards, that era’s Twitter and Facebook.

“The result?” he wrote. “Every voice is heard. The cacophony more closely resembles citizens band radio, complete with handles, harassment and anonymous threats. When most everyone shouts, few listen.”
internet  cyberbalkanization  social_media  democracy  hate_speech  culture  cb_radio  quotes 
november 2017
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