johnstok + open-source   85

Minio
Store photos, videos, VMs, containers, log files, or any blob of data as objects.

open source s3 clone
paas  open-source  database 
july 2016 by johnstok
A handy guide to financial support for open source.
Below I've listed every way I know of that people get paid for open source work, roughly ordered from small to large. Each funding category links to several real examples. (Wherever possible, I've tried to link to a useful article or page instead of just a homepage.)
open-source 
june 2016 by johnstok
Contributor Covenant: A Code of Conduct for Open Source Projects
Open Source has always been a foundation of the Internet, and with the advent of social open source networks this is more true than ever. But free, libre, and open source projects suffer from a startling lack of diversity, with dramatically low participation by women, people of color, and other marginalized populations.

Part of this problem lies with the very structure of some projects: the use of insensitive language, thoughtless use of pronouns, assumptions of gender, and even sexualized or culturally insensitive names.

An easy way to begin addressing this problem is to be overt in our openness, welcoming all people to contribute, and pledging in return to value them as human beings and to foster an atmosphere of kindness, cooperation, and understanding.

The Contributor Covenant can be one way to express these values. Pledge your respect and appreciation for contributors and participants in your open source project by adding an explicit CODE_OF_CONDUCT.md to your project repository.
open-source 
february 2016 by johnstok
Introduction - 18F Open Source Style Guide
This guide helps people document code repositories so that they're easy to use and understand. In each section, we outline our strategies for making sure that our code repositories are clear, accessible, and user-friendly.
open-source  public-sector 
october 2015 by johnstok
Implementing Open Standards in Open Source
Specifications are different from software, but they are weapons in the competitive software wars and they are subject to legal control by contract and by law. Companies try to control specifications because they want to control software that implements those specifications. This is often incompatible with the freedom promised by open source principles that allow anyone to create and distribute copies and derivative works without restriction.

This article explores ways that are available to compromise that incompatibility and to make open standards work for open source.
open-source  open-standards 
september 2015 by johnstok
What kind of licence should I choose?
There are many free and open source software licences, and while they all broadly attempt to facilitate the same things, they also have some differences. Some of the major differences can be grouped together into categories, and this document acts as an introduction to these categories. Having read this document, you should be able to understand which decisions you should take in order to select a licence for your code.
open-source  licensing 
april 2015 by johnstok
Open Source (Almost) Everything
When Chris and I first started working on GitHub in late 2007, we split the work into two parts. Chris worked on the Rails app and I worked on Grit, the first ever Git bindings for Ruby. After six months of development, Grit had become complete enough to power GitHub during our public launch of the site and we were faced with an interesting question:

Should we open source Grit or keep it proprietary?
open-source 
april 2015 by johnstok
Anna Shipman : JFDI
At ScaleSummit last week, I proposed a session on running Open Source projects. I am hoping to move the project I’m working on, vCloud Tools, from being coded in the open to being Open Source and wanted to get the benefit of the accumulated wisdom. It was an excellent session and I really got a lot out of it.

The executive summary is that if you are trying to build a community, you need to optimise for bringing people into the community, and a lot of the discussion focused around that. Here are some of the main things that I took away from it.
open-source 
april 2015 by johnstok
Guidelines - GDS Operations open source
This document describes a set of rules and principles for publishing Open Source code that we explicitly intend to support.
open-source 
april 2015 by johnstok
styleguides/use-of-READMEs.md at master · alphagov/styleguides
This is a guide to writing and maintaining README documents for GOV.UK's public repositories.
open-source 
april 2015 by johnstok
‎home.ccil.org/~cowan/floss/
Welcome to John Cowan's Free/Libre/Open Source license selection wizard. This wizard is intended to help you pick a license for your freely available software. It has no authority except my own.
open-source 
april 2015 by johnstok
How we moved vCloud Tools from Coding in the Open to Open Source | Technology at GDS
We already had several Open Source projects, mostly Puppet modules and our own Open Source guidelines, but we were interested in learning from others who knew about maintaining larger projects. One of the main things I learned while talking to people with experience in this area was that when running an Open Source project, you want to optimise for bringing people into your community.
open-source 
april 2015 by johnstok
CLAHub
Easily add a Contributor License Agreement to your GitHub project, let contributors sign it, and see at a glance which pull request authors have signed your CLA, and which haven’t.
legal  open-source 
february 2015 by johnstok
OpenStack Open Source Cloud Computing Software
OpenStack software controls large pools of compute, storage, and networking resources throughout a datacenter, managed through a dashboard or via the OpenStack API. OpenStack works with popular enterprise and open source technologies making it ideal for heterogeneous infrastructure.
IAAS  open-source 
january 2015 by johnstok
OpenShift by Red Hat
The Open Hybrid Cloud Application Platform by Red Hat.
PAAS  cloud  open-source 
january 2015 by johnstok
A Guide to Open-Sourcing Your Project at Work - Fog Creek Blog
Congratulations, you’ve written something at work that is amazing and you want to share it with the world! This guide covers three key areas that you should consider before making the leap: Why, when and how to do it.
open-source 
december 2014 by johnstok
OSSEC | Home | Open Source SECurity
OSSEC is an Open Source Host-based Intrusion Detection System that performs log analysis, file integrity checking, policy monitoring, rootkit detection, real-time alerting and active response.

It runs on most operating systems, including Linux, MacOS, Solaris, HP-UX, AIX and Windows.
Security  Web  open-source  IDS 
december 2014 by johnstok
Comparative analysis of copyright assignment and licence formalities for Open Source Contributor Agreements | SCRIPTed
This article discusses formal requirements in open source software contributor copyright assignment and licensing agreements. Contributor agreements are contracts by which software developers transfer or license their work on behalf of an open source project. This is done for convenience and enforcement purposes, and usually takes the form of a formal contract. This work conducts a comparative analysis of how several jurisdicitons regard those agreements. We specifically look at the formal requirements across those countries to ascertain whether formalities are constitutive or probative. We then look at the consequences of the lack of formalities for the validity of those contributor agreements.
open-source 
october 2014 by johnstok
How to tell if an open source project thriving | Opensource.com
There are informal methods for evaluating the sustainability of an open source project that may be useful where investment in a formal methodology is not justified, for example if the number of software evaluations your organisation undertakes is fairly small and infrequent.

In this document we’ll take a look at some of the key indicators of sustainability you can evaluate using basic web research techniques and publicly accessible information.
open-source 
september 2014 by johnstok
An Agency that Learns
Once you’ve made this distinction between project and product, you still need a way to choose the best one for your needs. Fortunately, plenty has been written about identifying healthy open source projects. OSS Watch has an excellent discussion of health measurements for open source that I can recommend.

As for products, happily, they can be evaluated just like projects. They just express successful attributes in different ways, and are actually not all that different from evaluating other software. Where a project should have many stars on GitHub or a vibrant mailing list, products should have customer references and a healthy partner ecosystem. Where a project’s quality can be measured by its test coverage or bug turnover, a product’s quality can be measured by certifications, like FIPS 140-2 or Common Criteria.
open-source 
september 2014 by johnstok
Open Standards and Open Source
Free and open source software has succeeded through its innovative licensing model and its collaborative development methods. Together these allow people who share a problem to also share a solution, and to improve that solution through their combined effort. Of course, free and open source software does not have a monopoly on this kind of technological collaboration. Since well before free and open source software existed, technologists have been creating standards that allow their products and services to work together, to benefit both themselves and their customers. Increasingly these days, these standards themselves are defined collaboratively within the technology industry, and the techniques they contain made available under licence to collaborators and competitors alike. Like free and open source software, these collaborative standards are often also described as ‘open’.

In the past the worlds of standards and software were more distinct; technological interoperability relied heavily on physical factors like the diameters of bolts and the shape of connectors. However as technology has become increasingly computerised, more and more standards, and the techniques they contain, are embodied in software alone. Open standards and open source sound like a perfect fit, but are they?
open-source  open-standards 
september 2014 by johnstok
Compatibility Of The Licensing Of Embedded Patents (in Open Standards) With Open Source Licensing Terms | Mitchell QC | International Free and Open Source Software Law Review
For many years software patenting has been an area of considerable contention, particularly in relation to whether it can, or should, be able to co-exist with Free and Open Source licenses. This issue has gained substantial additional impetus with the publication by the European Commission of the European Interoperability Framework, version 2, which, amongst other objectives, seeks to promote a level playing field for Free and Open Source Software in European public services. However, interoperability will often require the software to interact with a Standard which contains unavoidable patents.

The issues raised by this were of concern to a client of Andrew Katz, When the client sought the Opinion of Counsel on the matter , Andrew Katz prepared a brief setting out the client's concerns and, by way of illustration, providing the text of a cross-section of commonly-used Free and Open source Software Licences.

The Opinion was issued jointly by Iain G. Mitchell QC and Stephen Mason, Barrister.

The Client has now generously given permission for the Opinion to be published provided that the client's identity is not disclosed. What follows is a suitably edited version of that Opinion, which has been anonymised to respect the wishes of the client and which has been slightly shortened to allow for publication in the Review.
open-source  open-standards 
september 2014 by johnstok
Can you contribute code to an open source project?
You’ve written some code for a project that you’ve been following for some time. You are participating on the users email discussion list. You have been quietly following the developers email discussion list. You have downloaded the source code found in the nightly build repository, and you have written your first patch for some feature of the code that you think needs tweaking.

Can you contribute this patch to the project?
open-source 
september 2014 by johnstok
Contributor Licence Agreements
A Contributor Licence Agreement (CLA) is strongly recommended when accepting third party contributions to an open development project, such as an open source software project. In order to redistribute contributions, it is necessary to ensure that the project has the necessary rights to do so. A Contributor Licence Agreement is a lightweight agreement, signed by the copyright holder, that grants the necessary rights for the contribution to be redistributed as part of the project.
open-source 
september 2014 by johnstok
When Free Software Isn't Better :: Benjamin Mako Hill
Although the Open Source Initiative suggests "the promise of open source is better quality, higher reliability, more flexibility," this promise is not always realized. Although we do not often advertise the fact, any user of an early-stage free software project can explain that free software is not always as convenient, in purely practical terms, as its proprietary competitors. Free software is sometimes low quality. It is sometimes unreliable. It is sometimes inflexible. If people take the arguments in favor of open source seriously, they must explain why open source has not lived up to its "promise" and conclude that proprietary tools would be a better choice. There is no reason we should have to do either.

For open source, poor-quality software is a problem to be explained away or a reason to eschew the software altogether. For free software, it is a problem to be worked through. For free software advocates, glitches and missing features are never a source of shame. Any piece of free software that respects users' freedom has a strong inherent advantage over a proprietary competitor that does not. Even if it has other issues, free software always has freedom.
open-source 
september 2014 by johnstok
Seven Essential Qualities of Open Source
Here are seven qualities that I consider essential to the identity of open source, contrasted with the diluted forms they commonly assume. The point of this exercise is not to offer a single right answer about what open source means. That would be both presumptuous and impossible. Open source is inherently heterogeneous, like everything that happens in the agora.
legal  open-source 
september 2014 by johnstok
18F Open Source Policy
The default position of 18F when developing new projects is to:

1. Use Free and Open Source Software (FOSS), which is software that does not charge users a purchase or licensing fee for modifying or redistributing the source code, in our projects and contribute back to the open source community.
2. Create an environment where any project can be developed in the open.
3. Publish publicly all source code created or modified by 18F, whether developed in-house by government staff or through contracts negotiated by 18F.
open-source 
september 2014 by johnstok
Cyberduck | Libre FTP, SFTP, WebDAV, S3 & OpenStack Swift browser for Mac and Windows
Libre FTP, SFTP, WebDAV, S3 & OpenStack Swift browser for Mac and Windows.
open-source  app  osx  ftp  s3  webdav 
august 2014 by johnstok
Why WordPress Themes are Derivative of WordPress | Mark on WordPress
Fascinating discussion of open source wrt Wordpress themes: "Theme code necessarily derives from WordPress and thus must be licensed under the GPL if it is distributed."
open-source  licensing  IPR 
august 2014 by johnstok
The Free-Libre / Open Source Software (FLOSS) License Slide
There are a large number of Free-Libre / Open Source Software (FLOSS) licenses, but only a few are widely used. The widely-used licenses tend to be compatible, i.e., the software can be combined to produce a larger work. The following “license slide” figure makes it easy to see when common licenses can be combined.
open-source  IPR 
august 2014 by johnstok
Various Licenses and Comments about Them - GNU Project - Free Software Foundation
We classify a license according to certain key criteria: - Whether it qualifies as a free software license. - Whether it is a copyleft license. - Whether it is compatible with the GNU GPL. Unless otherwise specified, compatible licenses are compatible with both GPLv2 and GPLv3. - Whether it causes any particular practical problems. We try to list the most commonly encountered free software license on this page, but cannot list them all; we'll try our best to answer questions about free software licenses whether or not they are listed here.
licensing  open-source 
july 2014 by johnstok
Open Government Licence
The Controller of Her Majesty’s Stationery Office (HMSO) has developed this licence as a tool to enable Information Providers in the public sector to license the use and re-use of their Information under a common open licence. The Controller invites public sector bodies owning their own copyright and database rights to permit the use of their Information under this licence.
open-source  licensing  government 
july 2014 by johnstok
Licensing FAQ | Drupal.org
The Drupal Association has provided this FAQ to help clarify legal matters surrounding the licensing of the Drupal Project and the GNU General Public License.
open-source  licensing 
july 2014 by johnstok
Font Licensing — Free Software Foundation — working together for free software
There has been some recent confusion about font licensing. Since I wrote the font exception, let me tell you a bit about where we are, and how we got there, and what this all means to you.
fonts  typography  open-source  licensing 
july 2014 by johnstok
Source Serif Pro | Typekit
A fresh take on the transitional style, Source Serif was designed as a companion to Source Sans. Their close relationship was achieved through a careful match of letter proportions and typographic color. Designed for a digital environment, the letter shapes for Source Serif are simplified and highly readable. The historical background, in combination with a high technical standard, gives the typeface a strong character of its own, lending itself to setting extended text on both paper and screen.
fonts  typography  open-source 
june 2014 by johnstok
Twitter Bootstrap: Migrate to MIT License
Interesting thread where Twitter Bootstrap polls all contributors to successfully re-license under MIT (from Apache).
open-source 
june 2014 by johnstok
Twitter Contributor License Agreement
Example of a contributor license agreement.
open-source 
february 2014 by johnstok
How I Evaluate Open-Source Software
There always comes a time on a software project when you need to decide whether to build a feature or use an open-source implementation of it. […] With so much free software available now, we need a reliable way to find quality software and reduce the noise.
open-source  licensing 
january 2014 by johnstok
Build versus Buy versus Opensource
The way I think of it is this: For common problems use Opensource. For rare problems use Buy. For unique problems use Build.
open-source 
august 2013 by johnstok
Patterns and Practices for Open Source Software Success
How do you create a successful free or open source software project?
open-source 
august 2013 by johnstok
GeoNames
The GeoNames geographical database covers all countries and contains over eight million placenames that are available for download free of charge.
gis  open-source 
april 2013 by johnstok
Square Open Source
As a company built on open source, here are some of the internally-developed libraries we have contributed back to the community.
java  open-source 
april 2013 by johnstok
Free Font Manifesto
A small but growing number of designers and institutions are creating typefaces for the public domain. These designers are participating in the broader open source and copyleft movements, which seek to stimulate worldwide creativity via a collective information commons.
fonts  typography  open-source 
march 2013 by johnstok
SIL Open Font License (OFL)
The SIL Open Font License (OFL) is a free and open source license specifically designed for fonts and related software based on our experience in font design and linguistic software engineering.
legal  open-source  typography  fonts  license 
march 2013 by johnstok
TLDRLegal - Open Source Licenses Explained in Plain English
Lookup open source licenses summarized & explained in plain English.
legal  open-source 
february 2013 by johnstok
Producing Open Source Software
Free software projects have evolved a distinct culture, an ethos in which the liberty to make the software do anything one wants is a central tenet, and yet the result of this liberty is not a scattering of individuals each going their own separate way with the code, but enthusiastic collaboration.
from-tumblr  open-source  software 
august 2012 by johnstok
[untitled]
here the slides from last night's twitter #opensource summit, enjoy http://t.co/pY7bABNm http://t.co/6aHRrVpz http://t.co/zgNPuPRQ
open-source  from-twitter 
february 2012 by johnstok
[untitled]
here the slides from last night's twitter #opensource summit, enjoy http://t.co/pY7bABNm http://t.co/6aHRrVpz http://t.co/zgNPuPRQ
open-source  from-twitter  tweet  tweet 
february 2012 by johnstok
[untitled]
here the slides from last night's twitter #opensource summit, enjoy http://t.co/pY7bABNm http://t.co/6aHRrVpz http://t.co/zgNPuPRQ
open-source  from-twitter  tweet 
february 2012 by johnstok
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