jm + working-set-size   1

How To Measure the Working Set Size on Linux
A nifty metric:
The Working Set Size (WSS) is how much memory an application needs to keep working. Your app may have populated 100 Gbytes of main memory, but only uses 50 Mbytes each second to do its job. That's the working set size. It is used for capacity planning and scalability analysis.

You may never have seen WSS measured by any tool (I haven't either). OSes usually show you virtual memory and resident memory, shown as the "VIRT" and "RES" columns in top. Resident memory is real memory: main memory that has been allocated and page mapped. But we don't know how much of that is in heavy use, which is what WSS tells us.

In this post I'll introduce some new things I've developed for WSS estimation: two Linux tools, and WSS profile charts. The tools use either the referenced or the idle page flags to measure a page-based WSS, and were developed out of necessity for another performance problem.


(via Amy Tobey)
via:amytobey  memory  linux  rss  wss  proc  ps  processes  metrics  working-set-size  ram 
4 weeks ago by jm

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