jm + whiskey   7

Solera - Wikipedia
Fascinating stuff -- from Felix Cohen's excellent twitter thread.
Solera is a process for aging liquids such as wine, beer, vinegar, and brandy, by fractional blending in such a way that the finished product is a mixture of ages, with the average age gradually increasing as the process continues over many years. The purpose of this labor-intensive process is the maintenance of a reliable style and quality of the beverage over time. Solera means literally "on the ground" in Spanish, and it refers to the lower level of the set of barrels or other containers used in the process; the liquid (traditionally transferred from barrel to barrel, top to bottom, the oldest mixtures being in the barrel right "on the ground"), although the containers in today's process are not necessarily stacked physically in the way that this implies, but merely carefully labeled. Products which are often solera aged include Sherry, Madeira, Lillet, Port wine, Marsala, Mavrodafni, Muscat, and Muscadelle wines; Balsamic, Commandaria, some Vins doux naturels, and Sherry vinegars; Brandy de Jerez; beer; rums; and whiskies. Since the origin of this process is undoubtedly out of the Iberian peninsula, most of the traditional terminology was in Spanish, Portuguese, or Catalan.
wine  aging  solera  sherry  muscat  vinegar  brandy  beer  rum  whiskey  whisky  brewing  spain 
yesterday by jm
In 1973, I invented a ‘girly drink’ called Baileys
The creation of the iconic booze:
'We bought a small bottle of Jamesons Irish Whiskey and a tub of single cream and hurried back. It was a lovely May morning. 1973. Underdogs Sunderland had just won the FA Cup. We mixed the two ingredients in our kitchen, tasted the result and it was certainly intriguing, but in reality bloody awful. Undaunted, we threw in some sugar and it got better, but it still missed something. We went back to the store, searching the shelves for something else, found our salvation in Cadbury’s Powdered Drinking Chocolate and added it to our formula. Hugh and I were taken by surprise. It tasted really good. Not only this, but the cream seemed to have the effect of making the drink taste stronger, like full-strength spirit. It was extraordinary.'
whiskey  cream  booze  drinks  baileys  1970s  history  1973  chocolate  cocktails 
19 days ago by jm
The White Lies of Craft Culture - Eater
Besides field laborers, [Southern US] planter and urban communities both depended on proficient carpenters, blacksmiths, gardeners, stable hands, seamstresses, and cooks; the America of the 1700s and 1800s was literally crafted by people of color.

Part of this hidden history includes the revelation that six slaves were critical to the operation of George Washington’s distillery, and that the eponymous Jack Daniel learned to make whiskey from an enslaved black man named Nathan “Nearest” Green. As Clay Risen reported for the New York Times last year, contrary to the predominant narrative that views whiskey as an ever “lily-white affair,” black men were the minds and hands behind American whiskey production. “In the same way that white cookbook authors often appropriated recipes from their black cooks, white distillery owners took credit for the whiskey,” he writes. Described as “the best whiskey maker that I know of” by his master, Dan Call, Green taught young Jack Daniel how to run a whiskey still. When Daniel later opened his own distillery, he hired two of Green’s sons.

The popular image of moonshine is a product of the white cultural monopoly on all things ‘country’
Over time, that legacy was forgotten, creating a gap in knowledge about American distilling traditions — while English, German, Scottish, and Irish influences exist, that combination alone cannot explain the entirely of American distilling. As bourbon historian Michael Veach suggests, slave culture pieces together an otherwise puzzling intellectual history.
history  craft-beer  craft-culture  food  drink  whiskey  distilling  black-history  jack-daniels  nathan-nearest-green 
9 weeks ago by jm
Connemara shop in patents row with whiskey multinational
Beam Suntory own a trademark on the name "Connemara" -- utter fiasco. How was this granted? Connemara is a very well-known placename in Ireland
connemara  ireland  ip  trademarks  copyfight  beam-suntory  whiskey 
june 2017 by jm
Top 20 Bourbons Around $30 | The Bourbon Review
Need to keep an eye out for a few of these -- will probably be a little more than $30 given the whole import/export carry-on of course
bourbon  whiskey  booze 
december 2014 by jm
Endless Poptails
cocktails in an ice-pop. yum! The Cherry Apple Whiskey Sour and the Bourbon Butterscotch Latte pops in particular look fantastic. (via Damien Mulley)
via:mulley  booze  recipes  food  whiskey  cocktails  ice-pops  poptails  yum 
february 2014 by jm
Scotch Whiskey flavour wheels
mine's a Smoky/Spicy/Medicinal, thanks
scotch  whiskey  whisky  alcohol  dataviz  flavour 
january 2014 by jm

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