jm + voice   5

Computer says no: Irish vet fails oral English test needed to stay in Australia
An Irish veterinarian with degrees in history and politics has been unable to convince a machine she can speak English well enough to stay in Australia.

Louise Kennedy is a native English speaker, has excellent grammar and a broad vocabulary. She holds two university degrees – both obtained in English – and has been working in Australia as an equine vet on a skilled worker visa for the past two years.

But she is now scrambling for other visa options after a computer-based English test – scored by a machine – essentially handed her a fail in terms of convincing immigration officers she can fluently speak her own language.


This is idiotic. Computer-based voice recognition is in no way reliable enough for this kind of job. It's automated Kafkaesque bureaucracy -- "computer says no". Shame on Oz

(via James Kelleher)
via:etienneshrdlu  kafkaesque  bureaucracy  computer-says-no  voice-recognition  australia  immigration  english  voice  testing 
5 weeks ago by jm
AIY Projects Voice Kit
This looks nifty!
This project demonstrates how to get a natural language recognizer up and running and connect it to the Google Assistant. Along with everything the Google Assistant already does, you can add your own question and answer pairs. All in a handy little cardboard cube, powered by a Raspberry Pi.


(via sergio)
voice  google  aiy-projects  cardboard  hacks  raspberry-pi 
may 2017 by jm
Pink Trombone
A model of how voice sounds are produced. Pretty cool
voice  phonetics  sound  mouth  science 
march 2017 by jm
Where do 'mama'/'papa' words come from?
The sounds came first — as experiments in vocalization — and parents adopted them as pet names for themselves.

If you open your mouth and make a sound, it will probably be an open vowel like /a/ unless you move your tongue or lips. The easiest consonants are perhaps the bilabials /m/, /p/, and /b/, requiring no movement of the tongue, followed by consonants made by raising the front of the tongue: /d/, /t/, and /n/. Add a dash of reduplication, and you get mama, papa, baba, dada, tata, nana.

That such words refer to people (typically parents or other guardians) is something we have imposed on the sounds and incorporated into our languages and cultures; the meanings don’t inhere in the sounds as uttered by babies, which are more likely calls for food or attention.
sounds  voice  speech  babies  kids  phonetics  linguist  language 
october 2015 by jm

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