jm + visibility   2

Study: wearing hi-viz clothing does not reduce risk of collision for cyclists
Journal of Transport & Health, 22 March 2017:
This study found no evidence that cyclists using conspicuity aids were at reduced risk of a collision crash compared to non-users after adjustment for confounding, but there was some evidence of an increase in risk. Bias and residual confounding from differing route selection and cycling behaviours in users of conspicuity aids are possible explanations for these findings. Conspicuity aids may not be effective in reducing collision crash risk for cyclists in highly-motorised environments when used in the absence of other bicycle crash prevention measures such as increased segregation or lower motor vehicle speeds.
health  safety  hi-viz  clothing  cycling  commute  visibility  collision  crashes  papers 
9 weeks ago by jm
One Man's Plan to Make Sure Gene Editing Doesn't Go Haywire - The Atlantic
Open science - radical transparency where gene-editing and CRISPR is involved. Sounds great.
“For gene drive, the closed-door model is morally unacceptable. You don’t have the right to go into your lab and build something that is ineluctably designed to affect entire ecosystems. If it escapes into the wild, it would be expected to spread and affect people’s lives in unknown ways. Doing that in secret denies people a voice.”

Also this is a little scary:

in 2015, he was shocked to read a paper, due to be published in ... Science, in which Californian researchers had inadvertently created a gene drive in fruit flies, without knowing what gene drives are. They developed it as a research tool for spreading a trait among lab populations, and had no ambitions to alter wild animals. And yet, if any of their insects had escaped, that’s what would have happened.
science  openness  open-source  visibility  transparency  crispr  gene-editing  mice  nantucket  gene-drive 
july 2017 by jm

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