jm + via:zeynep   4

Solid advice on what to do in case the government shuts down the internet
....as is feared will happen right now in Hong Kong.
Dear Hong Kong friends: as people are worried about an internet shutdown, do not be afraid to make plans now. Find a VPN that you like and test it out. If Telegram is unusable, use Signal or WhatsApp (both are safe). If LIHGK is not usable, use Reddit or Facebook groups.
Above all, please remember that one of the biggest enemies you face are rumors. These will get worse if Internet access is curtailed; be careful about unverified news. As a general rule, you are best served by using a very big site (like Facebook or Google) than something small.
The very big sites are harder to shut down and to attack. They also have security teams that make it harder for people to interfere with them. Whatever backup plan you have, test it while things are still working, so you don't have to learn it when under lots of stress.
Twitter is another good choice for sharing information quickly. Google is also a safe option for chat/messages. All of these companies have experience fighting Chinese interference and will fight for you in case there is an effort to limit internet access in Hong Kong.
My biggest piece of advice: do not forget to look at cat pictures once in a while to reduce anxiety and stress!


VPN recommendations, via Zeynep Tufekci: 'the three I heard most about were: @getcloak (now encrypt.me), @theTunnelBear (PAID) and @FreedomeVPN. Don't use free ones.'
security  privacy  internet  shutdown  via:pinboard  via:zeynep  hong-kong 
20 days ago by jm
Computer says "prison camp"
China: Big Data Fuels Crackdown in Minority Region:
Chinese authorities are building and deploying a predictive policing program based on big data analysis in Xinjiang, Human Rights Watch said today. The program aggregates data about people – often without their knowledge – and flags those it deems potentially threatening to officials. According to interviewees, some of those targeted are detained and sent to extralegal “political education centers” where they are held indefinitely without charge or trial, and can be subject to abuse.

“For the first time, we are able to demonstrate that the Chinese government’s use of big data and predictive policing not only blatantly violates privacy rights, but also enables officials to arbitrarily detain people,” said Maya Wang, senior China researcher at Human Rights Watch. “People in Xinjiang can’t resist or challenge the increasingly intrusive scrutiny of their daily lives because most don’t even know about this ‘black box’ program or how it works.”


(via Zeynep Tufekci)
via:zeynep  human-rights  china  grim-meathook-future  future  grim  policing  xinjiang  prison-camps  surveillance  big-data 
january 2019 by jm

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