jm + via:tjmcintyre   11

Dr TJ McIntyre: Fight against cybercrime needs funding, not more words - Independent.ie
Is the Irish policing system capable of tackling computer crime? A report this week from the Garda Inspectorate makes it clear that the answer is no. There is no Garda cybercrime unit, which is of serious concern given the threat posed by cybercrime to key national infrastructure such as energy, transport and telecommunications systems. [...]

A combination of inadequate resources and increased workload have swamped the [Computer Crime Investigation Unit]. Today, almost every crime is a computer crime, in the sense that mobile phones, laptops and even devices such as game consoles are likely to contain evidence. The need to forensically inspect all these devices - using outdated equipment - has resulted in several-year delays and seem to have forced the unit into a position where it is running to stand still rather than responding to new developments.
via:tjmcintyre  ireland  cybercrime  law  policing  hacking 
december 2015 by jm
Huge Loss For Free Speech In Europe: Human Rights Court Says Sites Liable For User Comments | Techdirt
The ruling is terrible through and through. First off, it insists that the comments on the news story were clearly "hate speech" and that, as such, "did not require any linguistic or legal analysis since the remarks were on their face manifestly unlawful." To the court, this means that it's obvious such comments should have been censored straight out. That's troubling for a whole host of reasons at the outset, and highlights the problematic views of expressive freedom in Europe. Even worse, however, the Court then notes that freedom of expression is "interfered with" by this ruling, but it doesn't seem to care -- saying that it is deemed "necessary in a democratic society."


This is going to have massive chilling effects. Terrible ruling from the ECHR.
echr  freedom  via:tjmcintyre  law  europe  eu  comments  free-speech  censorship  hate-speech 
june 2015 by jm
UK piracy police arrest man suspected of running proxy server (Wired UK)
The site, Immunicity.org, offers a proxy server and a proxy autoconfiguration file (PAC) to tell browsers to access various blocked sites (PirateBay, KickassTorrents et al) via the proxy.
The Police Intellectual Property Crime Unit has arrested a 20-year-old man in Nottingham on suspicion of copyright infringement for running a proxy server providing access to other sites subject to legal blocking orders.


Is operating a proxy server illegal? Interesting. Seems unlikely that this will go to court though.

(Via TJ McIntyre)
immunicity  via:tjmcintyre  police  uk  piracy  proxies  http  pac  pipcu  copyright 
august 2014 by jm
HSE data releases may be de-anonymisable
Although the data has been kept anonymous, the increasing sophistication of computer-driven data-mining techniques has led to fears patients could be identified.
A HSE spokesman confirmed yesterday that the office responded to requests for data from a variety of sources, including researchers, the universities, GPs, the media, health insurers and pharmaceutical companies. An average of about two requests a week was received. [...]
The information provided by the HPO has significant patient identifiers removed, such as name and date of birth. According to the HSE spokesman, individual patient information is not provided and, where information is sought for a small group of patients, this is not provided where the number involved is under five. “In such circumstances, it is highly unlikely that anyone could be identified. Nevertheless, we will have another look at data releases from the office,” he said.


I'd say this could be readily reversible, from the sounds of it.
anonymisation  sanitisation  data-dumps  hse  health  privacy  via:tjmcintyre 
june 2014 by jm
The Spyware That Enables Mobile-Phone Snooping - Bloomberg
More background on IMSI catchers -- looking likely to have been the "government-level technology" used to snoop on the Garda Ombudsman's offices, particularly given the 'detection of an unexpected UK 3G network near the GSOC offices':
The technology involved is called cellular interception. The active variety of this, the “IMSI catcher,” is a portable device that masquerades as a mobile phone tower. Any phone within range (a mile for a low-grade IMSI catcher; as much as 100 miles for a passive interception device with a very large antenna, such as those used in India) automatically checks to see if the device is a tower operated by its carrier, and the false “tower” indicates that it is. It then logs the phone’s International Mobile Subscriber Identity number -- and begins listening in on its calls, texts and data communications. No assistance from any wireless carrier is needed; the phone has been tricked.
[...] “network extender” devices -- personal mobile-phone towers -- sold by the carriers themselves, often called femtocells, can be turned into IMSI catchers.


Via T.J. McIntyre
via:tjmcintyre  imsi-catchers  surveillance  privacy  gsocgate  mobile-phones  spying  imsi 
february 2014 by jm
Ukrainian government targeting protesters using threatening SMS messages
The government’s opponents said three recent actions had been intended to incite the more radical protesters and sow doubt in the minds of moderates: the passing of laws last week circumscribing the right of public assembly, the blocking of a protest march past the Parliament building on Sunday, and the sending of cellphone messages on Tuesday to people standing in the vicinity of the fighting that said, “Dear subscriber, you are registered as a participant in a mass disturbance.” [....]

The phrasing of the message, about participating in a “mass disturbance,” echoed language in a new law making it a crime to participate in a protest deemed violent. The law took effect on Tuesday. And protesters were concerned that the government seemed to be using cutting-edge technology from the advertising industry to pinpoint people for political profiling.

Three cellphone companies in Ukraine — Kyivstar, MTS and Life — denied that they had provided the location data to the government or had sent the text messages, the newspaper Ukrainskaya Pravda reported. Kyivstar suggested that it was instead the work of a “pirate” cellphone tower set up in the area.
targeting  mobile-phones  sms  text-messaging  via:tjmcintyre  geotargeting  protest  ukraine  privacy  surveillance  tech  1984 
january 2014 by jm
Whatever Happened to "Due Process" ?
Mark Jeftovic is on fire after receiving yet another "take down this domain or else" mail from the City of London police:
We have an obligation to our customers and we are bound by our Registrar Accreditation Agreements not to make arbitrary changes to our customers settings without a valid FOA (Form of Authorization). To supersede that we need a legal basis. To get a legal basis something has to happen in court. [...]

What gets me about all of this is that the largest, most egregious perpetrators of online criminal activity right now are our own governments, spying on their own citizens, illegally wiretapping our own private communications and nobody cares, nobody will answer for it, it's just an out-of-scope conversation that is expected to blend into the overall background malaise of our ever increasing serfdom. If I can't make various governments and law enforcement agencies get warrants or court orders before they crack my private communications then I can at least require a court order before I takedown my own customer.
city-of-london  police  takedowns  politics  mark-jeftovic  easydns  registrars  dns  via:tjmcintyre 
october 2013 by jm
Blocking The Pirate Bay appears to have 'no lasting net impact' on illegal downloading
In the fight against the unauthorised sharing of copyright protected material, aka piracy, Dutch Internet Service
Providers have been summoned by courts to block their subscribers’ access to The Pirate Bay (TPB) and related
sites. This paper studies the effectiveness of this approach towards online copyright enforcement, using both a
consumer survey and a newly developed non-infringing technology for BitTorrent monitoring. While a small
group of respondents download less from illegal sources or claim to have stopped, and a small but significant
effect is found on the distribution of Dutch peers, no lasting net impact is found on the percentage of the Dutch
population downloading from illegal sources.
fail  blocking  holland  pirate-bay  tpb  papers  via:tjmcintyre  internet  isps 
september 2013 by jm
Dutch grepping Facebook for welfare fraud
'The [Dutch] councils are working with a specialist Amsterdam research firm, using the type of computer software previously deployed only in counterterrorism, monitoring [LinkedIn, Facebook and Twitter] traffic for keywords and cross-referencing any suspicious information with digital lists of social welfare recipients.

Among the giveaway terms, apparently, are “holiday” and “new car”. If the automated software finds a match between one of these terms and a person claiming social welfare payments, the information is passed on to investigators to gather real-life evidence.' With a 30% false positive rate, apparently -- let's hope those investigations aren't too intrusive!
grep  dutch  holland  via:tjmcintyre  privacy  facebook  twitter  linkedin  welfare  dole  fraud  false-positives  searching 
september 2011 by jm
Internet Content Blocking: a primer [presentation]
from Malcolm Hutty, Head of Public Affairs at LINX (UK ISP organisation). insightful and a good summary of the state of the art in ISP-hosted filtering/blocking solutions.  The final few slides are especially useful
presentations  via:tjmcintyre  content-blocking  filtering  linx  malcolm-hutty  isps  blocking  blocklists  internet  privacy  from delicious
february 2011 by jm
"Child pornography is great", according to one EU music-business lobbyist
it's the perfect 'gateway' to allow anti-filesharing filtering of the internet. 'Start with child porn, which everybody agrees is revolting, and find some politicians who want to appear like they are doing something. Never mind that the blocking as such is ridiculously easy to circumvent in less than 10 seconds. The purpose at this stage is only to get the politicians and the general public to accept the principle that censorship in the form of ”filters” is okay. Once that principle has been established, it is easy to extend it to other areas, such as illegal file sharing. And once censorship of the Internet has been accepted in principle, they can start looking at ways to make it more technically difficult to circumvent.' Via TJ McIntyre
via:tjmcintyre  ifpi  filesharing  child-porn  filtering  internet  johan-schluter  anti-piracy-group  sweden  denmark  eu  from delicious
april 2010 by jm

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