jm + via:oisin   10

Download 67,000 Historic Maps (in High Resolution) from the Wonderful David Rumsey Map Collection | Open Culture
You do not need to be a Stanford student or faculty or staff member to access the vast treasures of the Rumsey Map collection, nor do you need to visit the university or its new Center. Since 1996, the Rumsey collection’s online database has been open to all, currently offering anyone with an internet connection access to 67,000 maps from all over the globe, spanning five centuries of cartography.


(via Oisin)
via:oisin  maps  art  graphics  open-access  mapping  history  david-rumsey  collections 
10 weeks ago by jm
8,000 sq ft start-up meeting space revealed for Dublin
Neat. this is a good location for post-work user-group meetups and the like (via Oisin)
via:oisin  meetups  meetings  ulster-bank  dublin  startups  chq 
august 2015 by jm
For a Good Strftime
'Easy Skeezy Ruby Date/Time Formatting' -- or indeed anywhere else strftime() is supported
strftime  time  date  formatting  coding  ruby  via:oisin 
june 2015 by jm
Squarespace
Nice, simple "build a website" platform. Keeping this one bookmarked for the next time someone non-techie asks me for the simplest way to do just that (thanks for the tip, Oisin)
via:oisin  blog  cms  design  hosting  web-design  web  websites 
april 2015 by jm
Privacy Security Talk in TOG – 22nd April @ 7pm – FREE
Dublin is lucky enough to have great speakers pass through town on occasion and on Wednesday the 22nd April 2015, Runa A. Sandvik (@runasand) and Per Thorsheim (@thorsheim) have kindly offered to speak in TOG from 7pm. The format for the evening is a general meet and greet, but both speakers have offered to give a presentation on a topic of their choice. Anyone one interested in privacy, security, journalism, Tor and/or has previously attended a CryptoParty would be wise to attend. Doors are from 7pm and bring any projects with you you would like to share with other attendees. This is a free event, open to the public and no need to book. See you Wednesday.

Runa A. Sandvik is an independent privacy and security researcher, working at the intersection of technology, law and policy. She contributes to The Tor Project, writes for Forbes, and is a technical advisor to both the Freedom of the Press Foundation and the TrueCrypt Audit project.

Per Thorsheim as founder/organizer of PasswordsCon.org, his topic of choice is of course passwords, but in a much bigger context than most people imagine. Passwords, pins, biometrics, 2-factor authentication, security/usability and all the way into surveillance and protecting your health, kids and life itself.
privacy  security  runa-sandvik  per-thorsheim  passwords  tor  truecrypt  tog  via:oisin  events  dublin 
april 2015 by jm
BPF - the forgotten bytecode
'In essence Tcpdump asks the kernel to execute a BPF program within the kernel context. This might sound risky, but actually isn't. Before executing the BPF bytecode kernel ensures that it's safe:

* All the jumps are only forward, which guarantees that there aren't any loops in the BPF program. Therefore it must terminate.
* All instructions, especially memory reads are valid and within range.
* The single BPF program has less than 4096 instructions.

All this guarantees that the BPF programs executed within kernel context will run fast and will never infinitely loop. That means the BPF programs are not Turing complete, but in practice they are expressive enough for the job and deal with packet filtering very well.'

Good example of a carefully-designed DSL allowing safe "programs" to be written and executed in a privileged context without security risk, or risk of running out of control.
coding  dsl  security  via:oisin  linux  tcpdump  bpf  bsd  kernel  turing-complete  configuration  languages 
may 2014 by jm
Irish Company Locates Office in Ireland
Hot on the heels of Dropbox, AirBnB, Twitter, Facebook and many others, Irish online ticket sales company Tito are amongst the latest in a long series of companies choosing to locate their offices in Ireland. “It just seemed to make sense,” said founder Paul Campbell, talking about the decision making process that led him to set up shop in the capital, Dublin. “Dublin is great. There’s something really familiar about it that I can’t quite put my finger on.”


Har har!
ireland  jokes  funny  tito  hq  tech-companies  dublin  via:oisin 
january 2014 by jm
Reducing MongoDB traffic by 78% with Redis | Crashlytics Blog
One for @roflscaletips. Crashlytics reduce MongoDB load by hacking in some hand-coded caching into their Rails app, instead of just using a front-line HTTP cache to reduce Rails *and* db load. duh. (via Oisin)
crashlytics  fail  roflscale  rails  caching  redis  ruby  via:oisin 
may 2013 by jm
CEO Of Internet Provider Sonic.net: We Delete User Logs After Two Weeks. Your Internet Provider Should, Too. - Forbes
"what we saw was a shift towards customers being made part of a business model that involved–I don’t know if extortion is the right word–but embarassment for gain. An individual would download a movie, using bittorrent, and infringe copyright. And that might be our customer, like Bob Smith who owns a Sonic.net account, or it might be their spouse, or it might be their child. Or it might be one of his three roommates in a loft in San Francisco, who Bob is not responsible for, and who rent out their loft on AirBnB and have couch surfers and buddies from college and so on and open Wifi.

When lawyers asked us for these users’ information, some of our customers I spoke with said “Oh yeah, crap, they caught me,” and were willing to admit they engaged in piracy and pay a settlement. But in other cases, it turned out the roommate did it, or no one would admit to doing it. But they would pay the settlement anyway. Because no one wants to be named in the public record in a case from So-And-So Productions vs. 1,600 names including Bob Smith for downloading a film called “Don’t Tell My Wife I B—F—— The Babysitter.”

AG: Is that a real title?

DJ: Yes. I’ve read about cases where a lawyer was doing this for the movie “The Expendables,” and 5% of people settled. So then he switched to representing someone with an embarassing porn title, and like 30% of people paid.

It seemed like half the time, the customer wasn’t the one right one, but they rolled over because it would be very embarassing. And I think that’s an abuse of process. I was unwilling to become part of that business model. In many cases the lawyers never pursued the case, and it was all bluster. But under that threat, you pay."
interview  isps  freedom  copyright  internet  shakedown  lawyers  sonic.net  data-retention  via:oisin 
june 2012 by jm

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