jm + via:markdennehy   4

"Mudslinging" campaigns drive down voting rates, particularly among the unsure
Does negative campaigning influence the likelihood of voting in elections? Our study of U.S. Senate campaigns indicates the answer is “yes.” We find that people distinguish between useful negative information presented in an appropriate manner and irrelevant and harsh mudslinging. As the proportion of legitimate criticisms increases in campaigns, citizens become more likely to cast ballots. When campaigns degenerate into unsubstantiated and shrill attacks, voters tend to stay home. Finally, we find that individuals vary in their sensitivity to the tenor of campaigns. In particular, the tone is more consequential for independents, for those with less interest in politics, and for those with less knowledge about politics.


(via Mark Dennehy)
politics  strategy  ireland  referenda  via:markdennehy  dirty-tricks 
may 2018 by jm
Ludicrous Patent of the Week: Rectangles on a computer screen
"Chinese internet giant Tencent" have been granted a USPTO patent for drawing a box on a screen.
boxes  screen  tencent  patents  uspto  funny  absurd  swpats  via:markdennehy 
october 2016 by jm
Evidence-Based Software Engineering

Objective: Our objective is to describe how software engineering might benefit from an evidence-based approach and to identify the potential difficulties associated with the approach.
Method: We compared the organisation and technical infrastructure supporting evidence-based medicine (EBM) with the situation in software engineering. We considered the impact that factors peculiar to software engineering (i.e. the skill factor and the lifecycle factor) would have on our ability to practice evidence-based software engineering (EBSE).
Results: EBSE promises a number of benefits by encouraging integration of research results with a view to supporting the needs of many different stakeholder groups. However, we do not currently have the infrastructure needed for widespread adoption of EBSE. The skill factor means software engineering experiments are vulnerable to subject and experimenter bias. The lifecycle factor means it is difficult to determine how technologies will behave once deployed.
Conclusions: Software engineering would benefit from adopting what it can of the evidence approach provided that it deals with the specific problems that arise from the nature of software engineering.


(via Mark Dennehy)
papers  toread  via:markdennehy  software  coding  ebse  evidence-based-medicine  medicine  research 
june 2015 by jm

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