jm + via:allspaw   2

Ironies of automation
Wow, this is a great paper recommendation from Adrian Colyer - 'Ironies of automation', Bainbridge, Automatica, Vol. 19, No. 6, 1983.
In an automated system, two roles are left to humans: monitoring that the automated system is operating correctly, and taking over control if it isn’t. An operator that doesn’t routinely operate the system will have atrophied skills if ever called on to take over.

Unfortunately, physical skills deteriorate when they are not used, particularly the refinements of gain and timing. This means that a formerly experienced operator who has been monitoring an automated process may now be an inexeperienced one.

Not only are the operator’s skills declining, but the situations when the operator will be called upon are by their very nature the most demanding ones where something is deemed to be going wrong. Thus what we really need in such a situation is a more, not a lesser skilled operator! To generate successful strategies for unusual situtations, an operator also needs good understanding of the process under control, and the current state of the system. The former understanding develops most effectively through use and feedback (which the operator may no longer be getting the regular opportunity for), the latter takes some time to assimilate.


(via John Allspaw)
via:allspaw  automation  software  reliability  debugging  ops  design  failsafe  failure  human-interfaces  ui  ux  outages 
16 days ago by jm
Brooklyn Integers | Integers as a service
Integers artisanally hand-crafted for you. See also the sister site, missionintegers.com: "Each of our bespoke numbers is created just for you in San Francisco’s historic Mission District. What will you use it for? A letter-pressed receipt. A special touch of latte art. A globally-unique user ID. A woolen hat. The possibilities are as infinite as the space of 64-bit unsigned ints." (via John Allspaw)
via:allspaw  humour  funny  integers  artisan  satire  hand-crafted 
july 2012 by jm

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