jm + vc   8

Basho investor to pay up $20m in damages for campaign that put biz on 'greased slide to failure' • The Register
This is disappointing. Basho was very promising.

An investment fund and its manager have been ordered to pay up $20.3m after "misinformation, threats and combative behaviour" helped put NoSQL database biz Basho on a "greased slide to failure".

As reported by The Register, the once-promising biz, which developed the Riak distributed database, faded away last year amid severe criticisms of the way its major investor, Georgetown Capital Partners, operated.

These centred around the control the investment firm and boss Chester Davenport gained over Basho, and how that power was used to block other funders and push out dissenting voices, with the hope of selling the company off fast.
basho  distcomp  riak  vc  software  silicon-valley 
7 days ago by jm
Commentary: The ‘Irish’ Startup Attribution Problem
Why don't Irish tech startup activity show up on a EU-wide comparisons? Turns out we tend to transition to a US-based model, with US-based management and EU-based operations and engineering, like $work does:
Successful Irish tech companies have a skewed geographic profile. This presents a data gathering problem for the data companies but its also a strong indicator of the market reality for Irish startups. The size of the local market and a focus on software business in particular means many Irish startups are transitioning to the US (some earlier and with more commitment than others), and getting backed by a spectrum of local and international VCs.


Correcting for this put Ireland's tech venture investment in the second half of 2014 at $125m, midway between Sweden and Finland, 8th in Europe overall.
ireland  tech  startups  investment  vc  europe  eu 
december 2016 by jm
waxpancake on Ello
The Ello founders are positioning it as an alternative to other social networks — they won't sell your data or show you ads. "You are not the product."

If they were independently-funded and run as some sort of co-op, bootstrapped until profitable, maybe that's plausible. Hard, but possible. But VCs don't give money out of goodwill, and taking VC funding — even seed funding — creates outside pressures that shape the inevitable direction of a company.
advertising  money  vc  ello  waxy  funding  series-a 
september 2014 by jm
Paul Graham and the Manic Pixie Dream Hacker
Under Graham’s influence, Mark [Zuckerberg], like many in Silicon Valley, subscribes to the Manic Pixie Dream Hacker ideal, making self-started teenage hackers Facebook’s most desired recruiting targets, not even so much for their coding ability as their ability to serve as the faces of hacking culture. “Culture fit”, in this sense, is one’s ability to conform to the Valley’s boyish hacker fantasy, which is easier, obviously, the closer you are to a teenage boy.

Like the Manic Pixie Dream Girl’s role of existing to serve the male film protagonist’s personal growth, the Manic Pixie Dream Hacker’s job is to embody the dream hacker role while growing the VC’s portfolio. This is why the dream hacker never ages, never visibly develops interests beyond hardware and code, and doesn’t question why nearly all the other people receiving funding look like him. Like the actress playing the pixie dream girl, the pixie dream boy isn’t being paid to question the role for which he has been cast.

In this way, for all his supposed “disruptiveness”, the hacker pixie actually does exactly what he is told: to embody, while he can, the ideal hacker, until he is no longer young, mono-focused, and boyish-seeming enough to qualify for the role (at that point, vested equity may allow him to retire). And like in Hollywood, VCs will have already recruited newer, younger ones to play him.
hackers  manic-pixie-dream-girl  culture-fit  silicon-valley  mark-zuckerberg  paul-graham  y-combinator  vc  work  investment  technology  recruitment  facebook  ageism  equality  sexism 
january 2014 by jm
'The Impact of Copyright Policy Changes on Venture Capital Investment in Cloud Computing Companies' [pdf]
'Our results suggest that the Cablevision decision, [which was widely seen as easing certain ambiguities surrounding intellectual property], led to additional incremental investment in U.S. cloud computing firms that ranged from $728 million to approximately $1.3 billion over the two-and-a-half years after the decision. When paired with the findings of the enhanced effects of VC investment relative to corporate investment, this may be the equivalent of $2 to $5 billion in traditional R&D investment.'

via Fred Logue.
via:fplogue  law  ip  copyright  policy  cablevision  funding  vc  cloud-computing  investment  legal  buffering 
march 2013 by jm
Don’t waste your time in crappy startup jobs
7 reasons why working for a startup sucks. Been there, done that -- I wish I'd read this years ago. It should be permalinked at the top of Hacker News.

"In 1995, a lot of talented young people went into large corporations because they saw no other option in the private sector– when, in fact, there were credible alternatives, startups being a great option. In 2012, a lot of young talent is going into startups for the same reason: a belief that it’s the only legitimate work opportunity for top talent, and that their careers are likely to stagnate if they work in more established businesses. They’re wrong, I think, and this mistaken belief allows them to be taken advantage of.

The typical equity offer for a software engineer is dismally short of what he’s giving up in terms of reduced salary, and the career path offered by startups is not always what it’s made out to be. For all this, I don’t intend to argue that people shouldn’t join startups. If the offer’s good, and the job looks interesting, it’s worth trying out. I just don’t think that the current, unconditional “startups are awesome!” mentality serves us well. It’s not good for any of us, because there’s no tyrant worse than a peer selling himself short, and right now there are a lot of great people selling themselves very short for a shot at the “startup experience” -- whatever that is."
startups  work  job  life  career  tech  vc  companies  pay  stock  share-options 
july 2012 by jm
PGP founder, Navy SEALs uncloak encrypted comms biz • The Register
'The company, called Silent Circle, will launch later this year, when $20 a month will buy you encrypted email, text messages, phone calls, and videoconferencing in a package that looks to be strong enough to have the NSA seriously worried. Zimmermann says that surveillance by the state and others has increased vastly over the last few years, and privacy improvement are again needed. "At the very least I want people, as part of their right in a free society to be able to communicate securely," he said in a promotional video. "I should be able to whisper in your ear, even if your ear is a thousand miles away." [...] While software can handle most of the work, there still needs to be a small backend of servers to handle traffic. The company surveyed the state of privacy laws around the world and found that the top three choices were Switzerland, Iceland, and Canada, so they went for the one within driving distance.'
pgp  phil-zimmermann  privacy  crypto  silent-circle  apps  vc  security 
june 2012 by jm
Simpleton's guide to git
it really is. Yet another one-page intro to git, but a good one
git  tips  via:joshua  scm  tools  vc 
august 2009 by jm

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