jm + vaccination   7

Study: You Can't Change an Anti-Vaxxer's Mind
According to a major new study in the journal 'Pediatrics', trying to [persuade anti-vaxxers to vaccinate] may actually make the problem worse. The paper tested the effectiveness of four separate pro-vaccine messages, three of which were based very closely on how the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) itself talks about vaccines. The results can only be called grim: Not a single one of the messages was successful when it came to increasing parents' professed intent to vaccinate their children. And in several cases the messages actually backfired, either increasing the ill-founded belief that vaccines cause autism or even, in one case, apparently reducing parents' intent to vaccinate.
vaccination  health  measles  mmr  autism  facts  via:mrneutron  stupidity  cdc  papers  vaccines 
february 2015 by jm
Minnesota Measles Outbreak Traced Back To A Single Unvaccinated Child
A single child caught measles while visiting Kenya, returned to Minnesota, infected 4 others, who in turn exposed others, with an ultimate count of 3000 exposed and 21 confirmed cases. (16 of the 21 were unvaccinated; 46% of the Somali children in this community were unvaccinated in a 2010 survey.)
minnesota  safety  measles  health  vaccination  kenya  somali 
june 2014 by jm
A Closer Look At OC's Anti-Vaccination Cluster
In communities such as San Clemente, Laguna Beach, Laguna Niguel, Aliso Viejo, Mission Viejo and Capistrano Beach, where Dr. Bob Sears practices, there are clusters of unvaccinated children. Last year, at 15 of the 40 elementary schools in the Capistrano Unified School District, more than 10 percent of kindergartners had [Personal Belief exemptions], according to data from the California Department of Public Health. At one public charter school, Journey, 56 percent of kindergartners were unvaccinated, at least partially, due to their parents' beliefs.

This is going to end horribly. Typical OC (update: South County OC! sorry Tatsuya ;)
orange-county  health  vaccination  laguna-beach  oc  dr-bob-sears  kindergarten  measles  mumps  rubella  pertussis  epidemiology 
may 2014 by jm
Growing up unvaccinated: A healthy lifestyle couldn’t prevent many childhood illnesses.
I understand, to a point, where the anti-vaccine parents are coming from. Back in the ’90s, when I was a concerned, 19-year-old mother, frightened by the world I was bringing my child into, I was studying homeopathy, herbalism, and aromatherapy; I believed in angels, witchcraft, clairvoyants, crop circles, aliens at Nazca, giant ginger mariners spreading their knowledge to the Aztecs, the Incas, and the Egyptians, and that I was somehow personally blessed by the Holy Spirit with healing abilities. I was having my aura read at a hefty price and filtering the fluoride out of my water. I was choosing to have past life regressions instead of taking antidepressants. I was taking my daily advice from tarot cards. I grew all my own veg and made my own herbal remedies. I was so freaking crunchy that I literally crumbled. It was only when I took control of those paranoid thoughts and fears about the world around me and became an objective critical thinker that I got well. It was when I stopped taking sugar pills for everything and started seeing medical professionals that I began to thrive physically and mentally.
health  medicine  science  vaccination  disease  slate 
january 2014 by jm
Swansea measles outbreak: was an MMR scare in the local press to blame?
Sixteen years ago, journalists had a much easier job assembling "balanced" stories about MMR in south Wales. When I wrote about the measles outbreak last week, I suggested that it was related to Andrew Wakefield's discredited 1998 Lancet research, but the Swansea contagion seems more likely to be the result of a separate scare a year earlier in the South Wales Evening Post. Before 1997, uptake of MMR in the distribution area of the Post was 91%, and 87.2% in the rest of Wales. After the Post's campaign, uptake in the distribution area fell to 77.4% (it was 86.8% in the rest of Wales).
That's almost a 14% drop where the Post had influence, compared with less than 3% elsewhere. In the dry wording of the BMJ, "the [South West Evening Post] campaign is the most likely explanation". In other words, what we can see in Swansea is the local effect of local reporting‚ in all probability, just a taster of what happens when the news irresponsibly creates unfounded terror.

[...] The 1997 coverage focused on a group of families who blamed MMR for various ailments in their children, including learning difficulties, digestive problems and autism‚ none of which have been found to have any connection with the vaccine.
The Post's coverage was at the time deemed a success, and in 1998 it won a prize for investigative reporting in the BT Wales Press Awards. That year, the SWEP ran at least 39 stories related to the alleged dangers of MMR. And yes, it's true that the paper never directly endorsed non-vaccination. What it did do was publicise the idea of "vaccine damage" as a risk, one that parents would then likely weigh up against the risk of contracting measles, mumps or rubella.
And this went beyond the reporting of parental anxieties‚ it was part of the Post's editorial line. One article is entitled "Young bodies cannot take it". The all-important "journalistic balance" was constantly available, thanks to campaigning parents and their solicitor Richard Barr. (It was Barr who engaged Wakefield for a lawsuit, leading to the "fishing expedition" research that became the Lancet paper.) They were happy to provide a quote on the dangers of the "triple jab", which health authorities were then obliged to rebut politely.
The Post also seemed to downplay the risk of measles, reporting on 6 July 1998 that "not a single child has been hit by the illness‚ despite a 13% drop in take-up levels". It's not parents who should feel embarrassed by the Swansea measles outbreak: some may have acted from overt dread at the prospect of harming their child, and some simply from omission, but all were encouraged by a press that focused on non-existent risks and downplayed the genuine horror of the diseases MMR prevents. The shame belongs to journalists: those of the South West Evening Post who allowed themselves to be recruited in the service of a speculative lawsuit, and any who let a specious devotion to "balance" overrule a duty to tell the truth.
south-wales  wales  mmr  health  vaccination  scares  journalism  ethics  disease  measles  south-wales-evening-post 
april 2013 by jm
Vaccination 'herd immunity' demonstration
'Stochastic monte-carlo epidemic SIR model to reveal herd immunity'. Fantastic demo of this important medical concept (via Colin Whittaker)
via:colinwh  stochastic  herd-immunity  random  sir  epidemics  health  immunity  vaccination  measles  medicine  monte-carlo-simulations  simulations 
april 2013 by jm

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