jm + ux   17

Interesting Twitter thread on email UI design, vs Slack
"When redesigning Outlook, we found two basic groups of users: pilers and filers. Pilers kept a single, ever-expanding list of mail in their Inbox and then worked it down to "inbox zero." Filers wrote rules or manually filed mail into folders, creating an organizational system.

Filers rely on their bespoke, highly customized knowledge of where things go in their email system, much like you might organize your kitchen in a way that makes sense to you. You know where the strainer or little corn-cob-holders go, and no one else does (or needs to.)

Pilers rely on search to find things in their huge amassed pile. We moved Outlook from the fundamental organization unit of "message" to "conversation" (or "thread") so that when pilers found mail via search, messages would return with the context of the surrounding conversation.

Both pilers and filers have one key thing in common: their systems require an affirmative, discrete action to take a mail out of their list. Filers file to a folder when done with a message, and pilers archive/delete. This turned out to be essential for people to feel in control."

really, "pilers" are using the UI that GMail pioneered, where credit is due (as far as I know at least).
mail  ux  ui  pilers-and-filers  filepile  email  slack  outlook 
6 days ago by jm
Actual screenshot of the broken UX of the Hawaii ballistic missile alert system
"This is the screen that set off the ballistic missile alert on Saturday. The operator clicked the PACOM (CDW) State Only link. The drill link is the one that was supposed to be clicked."

This is terrible, terrible UX.
ux  ui  hawaii  alerting  alerts  testing  safety  fail 
9 weeks ago by jm
Don Norman on "Human Error", RISKS Digest Volume 23 Issue 07 2003
It is far too easy to blame people when systems fail. The result is that
over 75% of all accidents are blamed on human error. Wake up people! When
the percentage is that high, it is a signal that something else is at fault
-- namely, the systems are poorly designed from a human point of view. As I
have said many times before (even within these RISKS mailings), if a valve
failed 75% of the time, would you get angry with the valve and simply
continual to replace it? No, you might reconsider the design specs. You would
try to figure out why the valve failed and solve the root cause of the
problem. Maybe it is underspecified, maybe there shouldn't be a valve there,
maybe some change needs to be made in the systems that feed into the valve.
Whatever the cause, you would find it and fix it. The same philosophy must
apply to people.
don-norman  ux  ui  human-interface  human-error  errors  risks  comp.risks  failures 
9 weeks ago by jm
The likely user interface which led to Hawaii's false-alarm incoming-ballistic-missile alert on Saturday 2018-01-13
@supersat on Twitter:

"In case you're curious what Hawaii's EAS/WEA interface looks like, I believe it's similar to this. Hypothesis: they test their EAS authorization codes at the beginning of each shift and selected the wrong option."

This is absolutely classic enterprisey, government-standard web UX -- a dropdown template selection and an easily-misclicked pair of tickboxes to choose test or live mode.
testing  ux  user-interfaces  fail  eas  hawaii  false-alarms  alerts  nuclear  early-warning  human-error 
9 weeks ago by jm
Unroll a long twitter thread with a single tweet. I like it
unroll  threads  twitter  reading  ux  bots 
september 2017 by jm
Blue Ocean
new Jenkins UX. looks great
jenkins  tests  ui  ux  pipelines  testing 
may 2016 by jm
Tahoe LAFS accidentally lose Bitcoin wallet with loads of donations in it, get it back
But ECDSA private keys don't trigger the same protective instincts that
we'd apply to, say, a bar of gold. One sequence of 256 random bits looks
just as worthless as any other. And the cold hard unforgeability of
these keys means we can't rely upon other humans to get our money back
when we lose them. Plus, we have no experience at all with things that grow in value by
four orders of magnitude, without any attention, in just three years.

So we have a cryptocurrency-tool UX task in front of us: to avoid
mistakes like the one we made, we must to either move these digital
assets into solid-feeling physical containers, or retrain our
perceptions to attach value to the key strings themselves.
backups  cryptography  bitcoin  cryptocurrency  ecdsa  private-keys  ux  money 
march 2016 by jm
Alarm design: From nuclear power to WebOps
Imagine you are an operator in a nuclear power control room. An accident has started to unfold. During the first few minutes, more than 100 alarms go off, and there is no system for suppressing the unimportant signals so that you can concentrate on the significant alarms. Information is not presented clearly; for example, although the pressure and temperature within the reactor coolant system are shown, there is no direct indication that the combination of pressure and temperature mean that the cooling water is turning into steam. There are over 50 alarms lit in the control room, and the computer printer registering alarms is running more than 2 hours behind the events.

This was the basic scenario facing the control room operators during the Three Mile Island (TMI) partial nuclear meltdown in 1979. The Report of the President’s Commission stated that, “Overall, little attention had been paid to the interaction between human beings and machines under the rapidly changing and confusing circumstances of an accident” (p. 11). The TMI control room operator on the day, Craig Faust, recalled for the Commission his reaction to the incessant alarms: “I would have liked to have thrown away the alarm panel. It wasn’t giving us any useful information”. It was the first major illustration of the alarm problem, and the accident triggered a flurry of human factors/ergonomics (HF/E) activity.

A familiar topic for this ex-member of the Amazon network monitoring team...
ergonomics  human-factors  ui  ux  alarms  alerts  alerting  three-mile-island  nuclear-power  safety  outages  ops 
november 2015 by jm
ustwo Reimagines the In-Car Cluster
Designers behind the cult mobile game, Monument Valley, take on the legacy-bound in-car UI
ux  ui  cars  driving  safety  ustwo  monument-valley  speed 
september 2015 by jm
In Praise of the AK-47 — Dear Design Student — Medium
While someone can certainly make the case that an AK-47, or any other kind of gun or rifle is designed, nothing whose primary purpose is to take away life can be said to be designed well. And that attempting to separate an object from its function in order to appreciate it for purely aesthetic reasons, or to be impressed by its minimal elegance, is a coward’s way of justifying the death they’ve designed into the word, and the money with which they’re lining their pockets.
design  ux  ak-47  kalashnikov  guns  function  work 
july 2015 by jm
Three Questions to Answer When Reporting an Error
Very long, but tl;dr:
the trick to creating an effective error message is to answer the 3 Questions within your message: What is the error? What was the probable cause of the error? What is the probable remedy?
errors  ui  ux  reporting  logging  coding 
may 2015 by jm
How to fix paste in OSX
Make "Paste and Match Style" the default, as it should be
paste  osx  ui  ux  cut-and-paste 
january 2015 by jm
Some UX Dark Patterns now illegal in the EU
The EU’s new consumer rights law bans certain dark patterns related to e-commerce across Europe. The “sneak into basket” pattern is now illegal. Full stop, end of story. You cannot create a situation where additional items and services are added by default. [...]

Hidden costs are now illegal, whether that’s an undeclared subscription, extra shipping charges, or extra items. [....]

Forced continuity, when imposed on the user as a form of bait-and-switch, has been banned. Just the other day a web designer mentioned to me that he had only just discovered he had been charged for four years of annual membership dues in a “theme club”, having bought what he thought was a one-off theme. Since he lives in Europe, he may be able to claim all of this money back. All he needs to do is prove that the website did not inform him that the purchase included a membership with recurring payments.
design  europe  law  ecommerce  ux  dark-patterns  scams  ryanair  selling  online  consumer  consumer-rights  bait-and-switch 
september 2014 by jm
"Sell products directly to your audience" -- Ben says it doesn't break the flow, doesn't take you to another site, no complicated registration forms -- the customer just enters CC details and that's it.
payments  ecommerce  selling  ebooks  music  ux 
june 2014 by jm
Google Maps Has Forsaken Us
+1. What has happened at Google? Did they fire ever employee in the UX department?
ux  ui  google  gmaps  mapping  web  techcrunch 
may 2014 by jm
Brick, A Literary Journal: Issue 85: The Lizard, the Catacombs, and the Clock
'The Story of Paris’s Most Secret Underground Society': among the Parisian catacomb-dwellers and subterranean explorers. fascinating
france  paris  underground  toread  ux  catacombs  marquis  writing  from delicious
july 2010 by jm

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