jm + upgrades   7

The World Is Getting Hacked. Why Don’t We Do More to Stop It? - The New York Times
Zeynep Tufekci is (as usual!) on the money with this op-ed. I strongly agree with the following:
First, companies like Microsoft should discard the idea that they can abandon people using older software. The money they made from these customers hasn’t expired; neither has their responsibility to fix defects. Besides, Microsoft is sitting on a cash hoard estimated at more than $100 billion (the result of how little tax modern corporations pay and how profitable it is to sell a dominant operating system under monopolistic dynamics with no liability for defects).

At a minimum, Microsoft clearly should have provided the critical update in March to all its users, not just those paying extra. Indeed, “pay extra money to us or we will withhold critical security updates” can be seen as its own form of ransomware. In its defense, Microsoft probably could point out that its operating systems have come a long way in security since Windows XP, and it has spent a lot of money updating old software, even above industry norms. However, industry norms are lousy to horrible, and it is reasonable to expect a company with a dominant market position, that made so much money selling software that runs critical infrastructure, to do more.

Microsoft should spend more of that $100 billion to help institutions and users upgrade to newer software, especially those who run essential services on it. This has to be through a system that incentivizes institutions and people to upgrade to more secure systems and does not force choosing between privacy and security. Security updates should only update security, and everything else should be optional and unbundled.

More on this twitter thread: https://twitter.com/zeynep/status/863734133188681732
security  microsoft  upgrades  windows  windows-xp  zeynep-tufekci  worms  viruses  malware  updates  software 
10 weeks ago by jm
Nix: The Purely Functional Package Manager
'a powerful package manager for Linux and other Unix systems that makes package management reliable and reproducible. It provides atomic upgrades and rollbacks, side-by-side installation of multiple versions of a package, multi-user package management and easy setup of build environments. '

Basically, this is a third-party open source reimplementation of Amazon's (excellent) internal packaging system, using symlinks to versioned package directories to ensure atomicity and the ability to roll back. This is definitely the *right* way to build packages -- I know what tool I'll be pushing for, next time this question comes up.

See also nixos.org for a Linux distro built on Nix.
ops  linux  devops  unix  packaging  distros  nix  nixos  atomic  upgrades  rollback  versioning 
september 2014 by jm
DropBox outage post-mortem
A bug in a scheduled OS upgrade script caused live production DB servers to be upgraded while live. Fixes include fixing that script by verifying non-liveness on the host itself, and a faster parallel MySQL binary-log recovery command.
dropbox  outage  postmortems  upgrades  mysql 
january 2014 by jm
RBS collapse details revealed - The Register
as noted in the gossip last week. 'The main batch scheduling software used by RBS is CA-7, said one source, a former RBS employee who left the company recently.' 'RBS do use CA-7 and do update all accounts overnight on a mainframe via thousands of batch jobs scheduled by CA-7 ... Backing out of a failed update to CA-7 really ought to have been a trivial matter for experienced operations and systems programming staff, especially if they knew that an update had been made. That this was not the case tends to imply that the criticisms of the policy to "offshore" also hold some water.'
outsourcing  failure  software  rbs  natwest  ulster-bank  ulster-blank  offshoring  downsizing  ca-7  upgrades 
june 2012 by jm
GitHub scheduled maintainance due to Redis upgrade
good comments on the processes useful for large-scale Redis upgrades
upgrades  redis  spof  nosql  databases  github  deployment  from delicious
may 2010 by jm
ClamAV and The Case of The Missing Mail - Return Path Blog
version 0.94.x got end-of-lifed a year after the release of .95, to fix a bug that would increase bandwidth consumption on their mirrors. To mandate upgrades, the devs sent a kill-switch trigger to .94 installations in the field. chaos ensues, unsurprisingly
clamav  filtering  mail  ouch  upgrades  end-of-life  support  open-source  sourcefire  return-path  from delicious
april 2010 by jm
Upgrade Xbox 360 hard drive
how to upgrade from 20GB to 120GB. this looks frankly terrifying (via Rod)
via:rod  upgrades  xbox360  gaming  hardware  xbox  mod  hacks  voids-warranty 
july 2009 by jm

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