jm + ucd   4

Grade inflation figures from Irish universities
The figures show that, between 2004 and 2013, an average of 71.7 per cent of students at TCD graduated with either a 1st or a 2.1. DCU and UCC had the next highest rate of such awards (64.3 per cent and 64.2 per cent respectively), followed by UCD (55.8 per cent), NUI Galway (54.7 per cent), Maynooth University (53.7 per cent) and University of Limerick (50.2 per cent).
tcd  grades  grade-inflation  dcu  ucc  ucd  ireland  studies  academia  third-level 
october 2014 by jm
Network graph viz of Irish politicians and organisations on Twitter
generated by the Clique Research Cluster at UCD and DERI. 'a visualization of the unified graph representation for the users in the data, produced using Gephi and sigma.js. Users are coloured according to their community (i.e. political affiliation). The size of each node is proportional to its in-degree (i.e. number of incoming links).' sigma.js provides a really user-friendly UI to the graphs, although -- as with most current graph visualisations -- it'd be particularly nice if it was possible to 'tease out' and focus on interesting nodes, and get a pasteable URL of the result, in context. Still, the most usable graph viz I've seen in a while...
graphs  dataviz  ucd  research  ireland  twitter  networks  community  sigma.js  javascript  canvas  gephi 
january 2013 by jm
Science funding doesn't add up - The Irish Times
'[Science Foundation Ireland] said it was continuing to support basic research, but there are a number of leading scientists here who were refused funding despite having qualified for it in the past.

Dr Mike Peardon of the School of Mathematics was recently been turned down, having been “administratively withdrawn”. This means the application for funding was rejected at the first post during initial consideration and before it had a chance to be assessed by external experts. Several others in his department suffered a similar fate. “The school of mathematics at Trinity is ranked the 15th best maths department in the world and now we are not fundable by Science Foundation Ireland,” he said.

“The cases I heard of have all been in pure maths,” said Prof Lorraine Hanlon in UCD’s school of physics. “All reported that the people in pure maths were returned unreviewed.” She believes other areas may also come under pressure. “Pure maths is the thin end of the wedge. The Government says mathematics is fundamental, but on the other side says we dont really care enough to support it. That is a schizophrenic approach,” she said.'
mathematics  ireland  science  research  academia  funding  tcd  ucd  sfi 
july 2012 by jm

Copy this bookmark:



description:


tags: