jm + types   8

GraphQL
a query language for APIs and a runtime for fulfilling those queries with your existing data. GraphQL provides a complete and understandable description of the data in your API, gives clients the power to ask for exactly what they need and nothing more, makes it easier to evolve APIs over time, and enables powerful developer tools.


Now being used by Facebook and Github -- looks quite interesting.
apis  data  github  facebook  graphql  languages  types 
12 weeks ago by jm
Flow
a static type checker for Javascript, from Facebook
javascript  code-analysis  coding  facebook  types  strong-types 
march 2016 by jm
The End of Dynamic Languages
This is my bet: the age of dynamic languages is over. There will be no new successful ones. Indeed we have learned a lot from them. We’ve learned that library code should be extendable by the programmer (mixins and meta-programming), that we want to control the structure (macros), that we disdain verbosity. And above all, we’ve learned that we want our languages to be enjoyable.

But it’s time to move on. We will see a flourishing of languages that feel like you’re writing in a Clojure, but typed. Included will be a suite of powerful tools that we’ve never seen before, tools so convincing that only ascetics will ignore.
programming  scala  clojure  coding  types  strong-types  dynamic-languages  languages 
november 2015 by jm
'Uncertain<T>: A First-Order Type for Uncertain Data' [paper, PDF]
'Emerging applications increasingly use estimates such as sensor
data (GPS), probabilistic models, machine learning, big
data, and human data. Unfortunately, representing this uncertain
data with discrete types (floats, integers, and booleans)
encourages developers to pretend it is not probabilistic, which
causes three types of uncertainty bugs. (1) Using estimates
as facts ignores random error in estimates. (2) Computation
compounds that error. (3) Boolean questions on probabilistic
data induce false positives and negatives.
This paper introduces Uncertain<T>, a new programming
language abstraction for uncertain data. We implement a
Bayesian network semantics for computation and conditionals
that improves program correctness. The runtime uses sampling
and hypothesis tests to evaluate computation and conditionals
lazily and efficiently. We illustrate with sensor and
machine learning applications that Uncertain<T> improves
expressiveness and accuracy.'

(via Tony Finch)
via:fanf  uncertainty  estimation  types  strong-typing  coding  probability  statistics  machine-learning  sampling 
december 2014 by jm
Flow, a new static type checker for JavaScript
Unlike the (excellent) Typescript, it'll infer types:
Flow’s type checking is opt-in — you do not need to type check all your code at once. However, underlying the design of Flow is the assumption that most JavaScript code is implicitly statically typed; even though types may not appear anywhere in the code, they are in the developer’s mind as a way to reason about the correctness of the code. Flow infers those types automatically wherever possible, which means that it can find type errors without needing any changes to the code at all. On the other hand, some JavaScript code, especially frameworks, make heavy use of reflection that is often hard to reason about statically. For such inherently dynamic code, type checking would be too imprecise, so Flow provides a simple way to explicitly trust such code and move on. This design is validated by our huge JavaScript codebase at Facebook: Most of our code falls in the implicitly statically typed category, where developers can check their code for type errors without having to explicitly annotate that code with types.
facebook  flow  javascript  coding  types  type-inference  ocaml  typescript 
november 2014 by jm
AtScript
a new "types for Javascript" framework, from the team behind Angular.js -- they plan to "harmonize" it with TypeScript and pitch it for standardization, which would be awesome.

(via Rob Clancy)
via:robc  atscript  javascript  typescript  types  languages  coding  google  angular 
october 2014 by jm
A cautionary tale about building large-scale polyglot systems
'a fucking nightmare':
Cascading requires a compilation step, yet since you're writing Ruby code, you get get none of the benefits of static type checking. It was standard to discover a type issue only after kicking off a job on, oh, 10 EC2 machines, only to have it fail because of a type mismatch. And user code embedded in strings would regularly fail to compile – which you again wouldn't discover until after your job was running. Each of these were bad individually, together, they were a fucking nightmare. The interaction between the code in strings and the type system was the worst of all possible worlds. No type checking, yet incredibly brittle, finicky and incomprehensible type errors at run time. I will never forget when one of my friends at Etsy was learning Cascading.JRuby and he couldn't get a type cast to work. I happened to know what would work: a triple cast. You had to cast the value to the type you wanted, not once, not twice, but THREE times.
etsy  scalding  cascading  adtuitive  war-stories  languages  polyglot  ruby  java  strong-typing  jruby  types  hadoop 
march 2014 by jm

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