jm + transactions + scalability   2

Scalable Atomic Visibility with RAMP Transactions
Great new distcomp protocol work from Peter Bailis et al:
We’ve developed three new algorithms—called Read Atomic Multi-Partition (RAMP) Transactions—for ensuring atomic visibility in partitioned (sharded) databases: either all of a transaction’s updates are observed, or none are. [...]

How they work: RAMP transactions allow readers and writers to proceed concurrently. Operations race, but readers autonomously detect the races and repair any non-atomic reads. The write protocol ensures readers never stall waiting for writes to arrive.

Why they scale: Clients can’t cause other clients to stall (via synchronization independence) and clients only have to contact the servers responsible for items in their transactions (via partition independence). As a consequence, there’s no mutual exclusion or synchronous coordination across servers.

The end result: RAMP transactions outperform existing approaches across a variety of workloads, and, for a workload of 95% reads, RAMP transactions scale to over 7 million ops/second on 100 servers at less than 5% overhead.
scale  synchronization  databases  distcomp  distributed  ramp  transactions  scalability  peter-bailis  protocols  sharding  concurrency  atomic  partitions 
april 2014 by jm
Spanner: Google's Globally-Distributed Database [PDF]

Abstract: Spanner is Google's scalable, multi-version, globally-distributed, and synchronously-replicated database. It is the first system to distribute data at global scale and support externally-consistent distributed transactions. This paper describes how Spanner is structured, its feature set, the rationale underlying various design decisions, and a novel time API that exposes clock uncertainty. This API and its implementation are critical to supporting external consistency and a variety of powerful features: non-blocking reads in the past, lock-free read-only transactions, and atomic schema changes, across all of Spanner.

To appear in:
OSDI'12: Tenth Symposium on Operating System Design and Implementation, Hollywood, CA, October, 2012.
database  distributed  google  papers  toread  pdf  scalability  distcomp  transactions  cap  consistency 
september 2012 by jm

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