jm + tracking   19

How to revoke all ad permissions from Oath GDPR pages
in summary:
document.querySelectorAll('input[type=checkbox]').forEach(val => val.checked = false)


(via stx)
via:stx  oath  gdpr  privacy  tracking  ads 
22 days ago by jm
Tracking Firm LocationSmart Leaked Location Data for Customers of All Major U.S. Mobile Carriers Without Consent in Real Time Via Its Web Site
LocationSmart, a U.S. based company that acts as an aggregator of real-time data about the precise location of mobile phone devices, has been leaking this information to anyone via a buggy component of its Web site — without the need for any password or other form of authentication or authorization — KrebsOnSecurity has learned. The company took the vulnerable service offline early this afternoon after being contacted by KrebsOnSecurity, which verified that it could be used to reveal the location of any AT&T, Sprint, T-Mobile or Verizon phone in the United States to an accuracy of within a few hundred yards.
locationsmart  verizon  sprint  t-mobile  att  brian-krebs  security  location-tracking  tracking  mobile  phones  location 
5 weeks ago by jm
GDPR will pop the adtech bubble
Without adtech, the EU’s GDPR (General Data Protection Regulation) would never have happened. But the GDPR did happen, and as a result websites all over the world are suddenly posting notices about their changed privacy policies, use of cookies, and opt-in choices for “relevant” or “interest-based” (translation: tracking-based) advertising. Email lists are doing the same kinds of things.

“Sunrise day” for the GDPR is 25 May. That’s when the EU can start smacking fines on violators.

Simply put, your site or service is a violator if it extracts or processes personal data without personal permission. Real permission, that is. You know, where you specifically say “Hell yeah, I wanna be tracked everywhere.”

Of course what I just said greatly simplifies what the GDPR actually utters, in bureaucratic legalese. The GDPR is also full of loopholes only snakes can thread; but the spirit of the law is clear, and the snakes will be easy to shame, even if they don’t get fined. (And legitimate interest—an actual loophole in the GDPR, may prove hard to claim.)

Toward the aftermath, the main question is What will be left of advertising—and what it supports—after the adtech bubble pops?
advertising  europe  law  privacy  gdpr  tracking  data-privacy 
5 weeks ago by jm
The Australian Bureau of Statistics Tracked People By Their Mobile Device Data.
The ABS claims population estimates have a “major data gap” and so they’ve been a busy bee figuring out a way to track crowd movement. Their solution? Mobile device user data. “…with its near-complete coverage of the population, mobile device data is now seen as a feasible way to estimate temporary populations,” states a 2017 conference extract for a talk by ABS Demographer Andrew Howe.

While the “Estimated Resident Population” (ERP) is Australia’s official population measure, the ABS felt the pre-existing data wasn’t ‘granular’ enough. What the ABS really wanted to know was where you’re moving, hour by hour, through the CBD, educational hubs, tourist areas. Howe’s ABS pilot study of mobile device user data creates population estimates with the help of a trial engagement with an unnamed telco company. The data includes age and sex breakdowns. The study ran between the 18th April to 1st May 2016. [....]

Electronic Frontiers Australia board member Justin Warren also pointed out that while there are beneficial uses for this kind of information, “…the ABS should be treading much more carefully than it is. The ABS damaged its reputation with its bungled management of the 2016 Census, and with its failure to properly consult with civil society about its decision to retain names and addresses. Now we discover that the ABS is running secret tracking experiments on the population?”

“Even if the ABS’ motives are benign, this behaviour — making ethically dubious decisions without consulting the public it is experimenting on — continues to damage the once stellar reputation of the ABS.”

“This kind of population tracking has a dark history. During World War II, the US Census Bureau used this kind of tracking information to round up Japanese-Americans for internment. Census data was used extensively by Nazi Germany to target specific groups of people. The ABS should be acutely aware of these historical abuses, and the current tensions within society that mirror those earlier, dark days all too closely.”
abs  australia  tracking  location-data  privacy  data-privacy  mobile 
8 weeks ago by jm
Why is this company tracking where you are on Thanksgiving?
Creepy:
To do this, they tapped a company called SafeGraph that provided them with 17 trillion location markers for 10 million smartphones.
The data wasn’t just staggering in sheer quantity. It also appears to be extremely granular. Researchers “used this data to identify individuals' home locations, which they defined as the places people were most often located between the hours of 1 and 4 a.m.,” wrote The Washington Post. [....]
This means SafeGraph is looking at an individual device and tracking where its owner is going throughout their day. A common defense from companies that creepily collect massive amounts of data is that the data is only analyzed in aggregate; for example, Google’s database BigQuery, which allows organizations to upload big data sets and then query them quickly, promises that all its public data sets are “fully anonymized” and “contain no personally-identifying information.” In multiple press releases from SafeGraph’s partners, the company’s location data is referred to as “anonymized,” but in this case they seem to be interpreting the concept of anonymity quite liberally given the specificity of the data.
Most people probably don’t realize that their Thanksgiving habits could end up being scrutinized by strangers.
It’s unclear if users realize that their data is being used this way, but all signs point to no. (SafeGraph and the researchers did not immediately respond to questions.) SafeGraph gets location data from “from numerous smartphone apps,” according to the researchers.
safegraph  apps  mobile  location  tracking  surveillance  android  iphone  ios  smartphones  big-data 
november 2017 by jm
Quividi - Leader in Attention Analytics
more "Anonymous Video Analytics" which is currently deployed in Dublin on-street billboards by a company called Orb with cameras pointing into public spaces. I am very curious whether this is legal under Irish DPA law given that sensitive personal data (your face) is being, while not _stored_ per se, _processed_ by this system without any provision for opt-in/opt-out.
advertising  privacy  technology  tracking  opt-in  quividi  orb 
may 2017 by jm
Did you know that Dublin Airport is recording your phone's data? - Newstalk
Ugh. Queue tracking using secret MAC address tracking in Dublin Airport:
"I think the fundamental issue is one of consent. Dublin Airport have been tracking individual MAC addresses since 2012 and there doesn't appear to be anywhere in the airport where they warn passengers that this is this occurring. "If they have to signpost CCTV, then mobile phone tracking should at a very minimum be sign-posted for passengers," he continues.


And how long are MAC addresses retained for, I wonder?
mac-addresses  dublin-airport  travel  privacy  surveillance  tracking  wifi  phones  cctv  consent 
november 2015 by jm
Red lines and no-go zones - the coming surveillance debate
The Anderson Report to the House of Lords in the UK on RIPA introduces a concept of a "red line":
"Firm limits must also be written into the law: not merely safeguards, but red lines that may not be crossed." …   
"Some might find comfort in a world in which our every interaction and movement could be recorded, viewed in real time and indefinitely retained for possible future use by the authorities. Crime fighting, security, safety or public health justifications are never hard to find." [13.19] 

The Report then gives examples, such as a perpetual video feed from every room in every house, the police undertaking to view the record only on receipt of a complaint; blanket drone-based surveillance; licensed service providers, required as a condition of the licence to retain within the jurisdiction a complete plain-text version of every communication to be made available to the authorities on request; a constant data feed from vehicles, domestic appliances and health-monitoring personal devices; fitting of facial recognition software to every CCTV camera and the insertion of a location-tracking chip under every individual's skin.

It goes on:
"The impact of such powers on the innocent could be mitigated by the usual apparatus of safeguards, regulators and Codes of Practice. But a country constructed on such a basis would surely be intolerable to many of its inhabitants. A state that enjoyed all those powers would be truly totalitarian, even if the authorities had the best interests of its people at heart." [13.20] …  

"The crucial objection is that of principle. Such a society would have gone beyond Bentham's Panopticon (whose inmates did not know they were being watched) into a world where constant surveillance was a certainty and quiescence the inevitable result. There must surely come a point (though it comes at different places for different people) where the escalation of intrusive powers becomes too high a price to pay for a safer and more law abiding environment." [13.21]
panopticon  jeremy-bentham  law  uk  dripa  ripa  surveillance  spying  police  drones  facial-recognition  future  tracking  cctv  crime 
november 2015 by jm
London garden bridge users to have mobile phone signals tracked
If it goes ahead, people’s progress across the structure would be tracked by monitors detecting the Wi-Fi signals from their phones, which show up the device’s Mac address, or unique identifying code. The Garden Bridge Trust says it will not store any of this data and is only tracking phones to count numbers and prevent overcrowding.

london  surveillance  mobile-phones  mac-trackers  tracking 
november 2015 by jm
User data plundering by Android and iOS apps is as rampant as you suspected
An app from Drugs.com, meanwhile, sent the medical search terms "herpes" and "interferon" to five domains, including doubleclick.net, googlesyndication.com, intellitxt.com, quantserve.com, and scorecardresearch.com, although those domains didn't receive other personal information.
privacy  security  google  tracking  mobile  phones  search  pii 
november 2015 by jm
Madhumita Venkataramanan: My identity for sale (Wired UK)
If the data aggregators know everything about you -- including biometric data, healthcare history, where you live, where you work, what you do at the weekend, what medicines you take, etc. -- and can track you as an individual, does it really matter that they don't know your _name_? They legally track, and sell, everything else.
As the data we generate about ourselves continues to grow exponentially, brokers and aggregators are moving on from real-time profiling -- they're cross-linking data sets to predict our future behaviour. Decisions about what we see and buy and sign up for aren't made by us any more; they were made long before. The aggregate of what's been collected about us previously -- which is near impossible for us to see in its entirety -- defines us to companies we've never met. What I am giving up without consent, then, is not just my anonymity, but also my right to self-determination and free choice. All I get to keep is my name.
wired  privacy  data-aggregation  identity-theft  future  grim  biometrics  opt-out  healthcare  data  data-protection  tracking 
november 2014 by jm
Vodafone UK, Verizon add mandatory device-tracking token on all web requests
'Verizon Wireless is monitoring users' mobile internet traffic, using a token slapped onto web requests, to facilitate targeted advertising even if a user has opted out.

The unique identifier token header (UIDH) was launched two years ago, and has caused an uproar in tech circles after it was re-discovered Thursday by Electronic Frontier Foundation staffer Jacob Hoffman-Andrews.

The Relevant Mobile Advertising program, under which the UIDH was used, allowed a restaurant to advertised to locals only or for retail websites to promote to previous visitors, according to Verizon Wireless.'
uidh  verizon  vodafone  privacy  tracking  http  cookies  advertising 
october 2014 by jm
Irish NewsDiffs
Tracking Irish News Stories Over Time;
Irish NewsDiffs archives changes in articles after publication.
Currently, we track rte.ie and irishtimes.com.
rte  irish-times  diffing  diffs  changes  tracking  newspapers  news  ireland  history 
april 2014 by jm
Ukrainian police use cellphones to track protestors, court order shows
Protesters for weeks had suspected that the government was using location data from cellphones near the demonstration to pinpoint people for political profiling, and they received alarming confirmation when a court formally ordered a telephone company to hand over such data. [...] Three cellphone companies — Kyivstar, MTS and Life — denied that they had provided the location data to the government or had sent the text messages. Kyivstar suggested that it was instead the work of a “pirate” cellphone tower set up in the area. In a ruling made public on Wednesday, a city court ordered Kyivstar to disclose to the police which cellphones were turned on during an antigovernment protest outside the courthouse on Jan. 10.
tech  location-tracking  tracking  privacy  ukraine  cellphones  mobile-phones  civil-liberties 
january 2014 by jm
Spybike
This is brilliant. 'covert bicycle GPS tracker; Notifies you by SMS if your bicycle moves; Online tracking'. 'Spybike is a covert tracking device that is hidden inside your bicycle steerer tube. The device is disguised to look like a normal head set cap to avoid suspicion. If someone steals your bike, you can use SpyBike to track their movements online and on your mobile.' More details: http://www.integratedtrackers.com/GPSTrack/pdf/Spybike_Instructions_2.pdf
spybike  cycling  theft  gps  tracking 
july 2013 by jm
Cellphones Track Your Every Move, and You May Not Even Know - NYTimes.com
data retention in Germany revealed via FOI: 'in a six-month period — from Aug 31, 2009, to Feb. 28, 2010, Deutsche Telekom had recorded and saved his longitude and latitude coordinates more than 35,000 times. It traced him from a train on the way to Erlangen at the start through to that last night, when he was home in Berlin.'
data-retention  germany  phones  mobile  geolocation  tracking  mobile-phones  surveillance  from delicious
march 2011 by jm
Network Advertising Initiative: Opt-Out of Behavioural Advertising
'developed for the express purpose of allowing consumers to "opt out" of the behavioral advertising delivered by our member companies' -- opt out of the top 50 or so ad programs with a couple of clicks, via Jordan Sissel. great stuff
ads  advertising  browser  cookies  via:jordansissel  google  marketing  opt-out  privacy  tracking  web  behavioral  from delicious
june 2010 by jm
Track down your stolen laptop – Prey
hmm, a nifty app that takes pics of the desktop, activates the webcam etc. and uploads to a central server if you activate a 'my laptop has been stolen' bit
prey  theft  laptop  osx  linux  windows  tracking  recovery  crime  lojack  from delicious
october 2009 by jm

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