jm + telecoms   3

It's official, ADSL works over wet string
So, there you go, ADSL over 2m of literal "wet string". Well done all for testing this. It shows the importance of handling faults that seem to just be "low speed".
adsl  faults  hacks  funny  networking  dsl  telecoms 
5 weeks ago by jm
Just As We Warned: A Chinese Tech Giant Goes On The Patent Attack -- In East Texas | Techdirt
Techdirt has been warning for years that the West's repeated demands for China to "respect" patents could backfire badly. [...] And guess what? That is exactly what has just happened, as The Wall Street Journal reports:

'Huawei Technologies Co. said it has filed a lawsuit against T-Mobile US Inc., alleging the U.S. telecommunications carrier violated the Chinese company’s patents related to wireless networks. In its complaint filed this week in the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Texas, Huawei said T-Mobile is using its patented technology without signing a licensing agreement.'


At least this is the most likely scenario to result in patent reform, finally.
patents  east-texas  huawei  t-mobile  telecoms  law 
july 2016 by jm
Necessary and Proportionate -- In Which Civil Society is Caught Between a Cop and a Spy
Modern telecommunications technology implied the development of modern telecommunications surveillance, because it moved the scope of action from the physical world (where intelligence, generally seen as part of the military mission, had acted) to the virtual world—including the scope of those actions that could threaten state power. While the public line may have been, as US Secretary of State Henry Stimson said in 1929, “gentlemen do not open each other’s mail”, you can bet that they always did keep a keen eye on the comings and goings of each other’s shipping traffic.

The real reason that surveillance in the context of state intelligence was limited until recently was because it was too expensive, and it was too expensive for everyone. The Westphalian compromise demands equality of agency as tied to territory. As soon as one side gains a significant advantage, the structure of sovereignty itself is threatened at a conceptual level — hence Oppenheimer as the death of any hope of international rule of law. Once surveillance became cheap enough, all states were (and will increasingly be) forced to attempt it at scale, as a reaction to this pernicious efficiency. The US may be ahead of the game now, but Moore’s law and productization will work their magic here.
government  telecoms  snooping  gchq  nsa  surveillance  law  politics  intelligence  spying  internet 
september 2013 by jm

Copy this bookmark:



description:


tags: