jm + surgery   5

Surgical team collaborates with McLaren F1 to improve processes
On the screen was a motor racing grand prix and, as they watched, the two men became aware of the similarities between the handover disciplines from theatre to intensive care and what they were seeing in the pit of a Formula One racing team.

From that moment began a collaboration between the leaders of Great Ormond Street's surgical and intensive care units, first with the McLaren F1 racing team and then with Ferrari's team chief Jan Todt, technical guru Ross Brawn and, in particular, race technical director Nigel Stepney.

They worked together at their home base in Modena, Italy, in the pits of the British Grand Prix and in the Great Ormond Street theatre and intensive care ward.

The major restructuring of the patient handover procedure, resulting directly from the input of the F1 pit technicians, will soon be described in two scientific publications.

"It is not too early to say that, when we look at the number of critical instances we encounter, they have reduced markedly since we introduced the modified training protocol developed from what we have learned from Formula 1," said Prof Elliott.

The single A4 sheet of paper, which contained the flow diagram of Ferrari's pit procedure, became several pages of twice that size when Mr Stepney and his colleagues at Ferrari were confronted with the critical transfer from operating theatre to recovery room at Great Ormond Street.
collaboration  cross-discipline  surgery  formula-1  mclaren  pitstops  cardiac 
7 weeks ago by jm
Why are transhumanists such dicks?
Good discussion from a transhumanist forum (via Boing Boing):
"I’ve been around and interviewed quite a lot of self-identified
transhumanists in the last couple of years, and I’ve noticed many of them
express a fairly stark ideology that is at best libertarian, and at worst
Randian. Very much “I want super bionic limbs and screw the rest of the world”.
They tend to brush aside the ethical, environmental, social and political
ramifications of human augmentation so long as they get to have their toys.
There’s also a common expression that if sections of society are harmed by transhumanist
progress, then it is unfortunate but necessary for the greater good (the greater
good often being bestowed primarily upon those endorsing the transhumanism).

That attitude isn’t prevalent on this forum at all – I think
the site tends to attract more practical body-modders than theoretical transhumanists
– but I wondered if anyone else here had experienced the same attitudes in
their own circles? What do you make of it?"
transhumanism  evolution  body-modding  surgery  philosophy  via:boingboing  libertarianism  society  politics 
march 2015 by jm
Getting good cancer care through 3D printing
This is pretty incredible.
Balzer downloaded a free software program called InVesalius, developed by a research center in Brazil to convert MRI and CT scan data to 3D images. He used it to create a 3D volume rendering from Scott’s DICOM images, which allowed him to look at the tumor from any angle. Then he uploaded the files to Sketchfab and shared them with neurosurgeons around the country in the hope of finding one who was willing to try a new type of procedure. Perhaps unsurprisingly, he found the doctor he was looking for at UPMC, where Scott had her thyroid removed. A neurosurgeon there agreed to consider a minimally invasive operation in which he would access the tumor through Scott’s left eyelid and remove it using a micro drill. Balzer had adapted the volume renderings for 3D printing and produced a few full-size models of the front section of Scott’s skull on his MakerBot. To help the surgeon vet his micro drilling idea and plan the procedure, Balzer packed up one of the models and shipped it off to Pittsburgh.
diy  surgery  health  cancer  tumours  medicine  3d-printing  3d  scanning  mri  dicom 
january 2015 by jm
seeing into the UV spectrum after Cataract Surgery with Crystalens
I've been very happy so far with the Crystalens implant for Cataract Surgery [...] one unexpected/interesting aspect is I see a violet glow that others do not - perhaps I'm more sensitive to the low end of the visible light spectrum.


(via Tony Finch)
via:fanf  science  perception  augmentation  uv  light  sight  cool  cataracts  surgery  lens  eyes 
june 2013 by jm
Auto-appendectomy in the Antarctic: case report -- Rogozov and Bermel 339: b4965 -- BMJ
holy shit. This is absolutely amazing, a first-person account of auto-appendectomy (via infovore)
history  science  russian  medicine  antarctica  medical  amazing  appendectomy  surgery  from delicious
january 2010 by jm

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