jm + space   36

NASA's Sound Suppression Water System
If you’ve ever watched a rocket launch, you’ve probably noticed the billowing clouds around the launch pad during lift-off. What you’re seeing is not actually the rocket’s exhaust but the result of a launch pad and vehicle protection system known in NASA parlance as the Sound Suppression Water System. Exhaust gases from a rocket typically exit at a pressure higher than the ambient atmosphere, which generates shock waves and lots of turbulent mixing between the exhaust and the air. Put differently, launch ignition is incredibly loud, loud enough to cause structural damage to the launchpad and, via reflection, the vehicle and its contents. To mitigate this problem, launch operators use a massive water injection system that pours about 3.5 times as much water as rocket propellant per second. This significantly reduces the noise levels on the launchpad and vehicle and also helps protect the infrastructure from heat damage.
water  rockets  launch  nasa  space  sound-suppression  sound  science 
august 2017 by jm
Here’s every total solar eclipse happening in your lifetime
Excellent infographic (sadly, none in Ireland for the rest of my lifetime)
eclipse  space  maps  science  infographic  solar-eclipse  sun 
july 2017 by jm
Moonbase Alpha | Flickr
Lots and lots of shots of "Space: 1999" interiors. <3
space-1999  space  futurism  1970s  tv  retro  scifi 
april 2017 by jm
Who Discovered Why The Challenger Exploded?
Everyone knows Richard Feynman’s famous televised demonstration that the Challenger had exploded because its O-rings got stiff when they were cold -- but it wasn’t Feynman’s discovery. It was Sally Ride’s.'

(via Tony Finch)
richard-feynman  sally-ride  history  space  challenger  o-rings  science  engineering  nasa 
march 2017 by jm
Building the plane on the way up
in 1977, Jet Propulsion Lab (JPL) scientists packed a Reed-Solomon encoder in each Voyager, hardware designed to add error-correcting bits to all data beamed back at a rate of efficiency 80 percent higher than an older method also included with Voyager. Where did the hope come in? When the Voyager probes were launched with Reed-Solomon encoders on board, no Reed-Solomon decoders existed on Earth.
reed-solomon  encoding  error-correction  voyager  vger  history  space  nasa  probes  signalling 
january 2017 by jm
Great comment on the "realism" of space photos
In short, the answer to the question “is this what it would look like if I was there?” is almost always no, but that is true of every photograph. The photos taken from space cameras are no more fake or false than the photos taken from any camera. Like all photos they are a visual interpretation using color to display data. Most space photos have information online about how they were created, what filters were used, and all kinds of interesting details about processing. The discussion about whether a space photo is real or fake is meaningless. There's no distinction between photoshopped and not. It's a nuanced view but the nature of the situation demands it.
photography  photos  space  cassini  probes  cameras  light  wavelengths  science  vision  realism  real 
november 2016 by jm
The ultimate off-site backup

So assuming the mission continues well, in 2014 the Rosetta Probe will land on Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, where it will measure the comet's molecular composition. Then it will remain at rest as the comet orbits the sun for hundreds of millions of years. So somewhere in the solar system, where it is safe but hard to reach, a backup sample of human languages is stored, in case we need one.


As jwz says: 'The Rosetta Disc is now safely installed on 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko.'
rosetta  long-now  history  language  comets  solar-system  space 
october 2016 by jm
The mysterious syndrome impairing astronauts’ sight - The Washington Post
Visual impairment intracranial pressure syndrome (VIIP) is named for the leading theory to explain it. On Earth, gravity pulls bodily fluids down toward the feet. That doesn’t happen in space, and it is thought that extra fluid in the skull increases pressure on the brain and the back of the eye.
viip  sight  eyes  space  zero-gravity  health 
july 2016 by jm
The Apollo 11 AGC source code was uploaded to Github, and someone opened an issue
For the famous Apollo 13 near-fatal failure scenario:
'A customer has had a fairly serious problem with stirring the cryogenic tanks with a circuit fault present. To reproduce:

Build CSM;
Perform mission up to translunar coast;
During translunar coast, attempt to stir cryo tanks

If a wiring fault exists, the issue may be replicated. Be aware that this may be hazardous to the tester attempting it.'

Sample response: 'Does it happens only with translunar coast (sol-3-a), or any moon coasting? It may be a problem with the moon. Just trying to narrow down the issue.'
lol  funny  apollo  apollo-11  apollo-13  agc  history  space  github 
july 2016 by jm
Our Generation Ships Will Sink / Boing Boing
Kim Stanley Robinson on the feasibility of interstellar colonization: 'There is no Planet B! Earth is our only possible home!'
earth  future  kim-stanley-robinson  sf  space 
november 2015 by jm
Michael Kagan | Prints
'Heavily tinted blue paintings form space stations, spacesuits, and rockets just after blast. Michael Kagan paints these large-scale works to celebrate the man-made object—machinery that both protects and holds the possibility of instantly killing those that operate the equipment from the inside. To paint the large works, Kagan utilizes an impasto technique with thick strokes that are deliberate and unique, showing an aggression in his application of oil paint on linen. The New York-based artist focuses on iconic images in his practice, switching back and forth between abstract and representational styles. “The painting is finished when it can fall apart and come back together depending on how it is read and the closeness to the work,” said Kagan about his work. “Each painting is an image, a snapshot, a flash moment, a quick read that is locked into memory by the iconic silhouettes.”'

Via http://www.thisiscolossal.com/2015/08/michael-kagens-space-paintings/
paintings  prints  art  michael-kagan  space  abstract-art  tobuy 
september 2015 by jm
Mars One finalist Dr. Joseph Roche rips into the project
So, here are the facts as we understand them: Mars One has almost no money. Mars One has no contracts with private aerospace suppliers who are building technology for future deep-space missions. Mars One has no TV production partner. Mars One has no publicly known investment partnerships with major brands. Mars One has no plans for a training facility where its candidates would prepare themselves. Mars One’s candidates have been vetted by a single person, in a 10-minute Skype interview.

“My nightmare about it is that people continue to support it and give it money and attention, and it then gets to the point where it inevitably falls on its face,” said Roche. If, as a result, “people lose faith in NASA and possibly even in scientists, then that’s the polar opposite of what I’m about. If I was somehow linked to something that could do damage to the public perception of science, that is my nightmare scenario.”
science  space  mars-one  tcd  joseph-roche  nasa  mars  exploration  scams 
march 2015 by jm
Space Jacket
'I designed this jacket as a tribute to the continuing legacy of American spaceflight. I wanted it to embody everything I loved about the space program, and to eventually serve as an actual flight jacket for present-day astronauts on missions to the ISS (International Space Station). There are other “replica” flight jackets made for space enthusiasts, but I decided to come up with something boldly different, yet also completely wearable and well-suited for space.'
space  clothing  fashion  geekery  jackets 
october 2014 by jm
A Japanese Artist Launches Plants Into Space
This is amazing.
though the vessel was found on the ground, the flowers were not.
japan  art  bonsai  flowers  space  nevada  black-rock-desert  exobiotanica 
july 2014 by jm
Rope-core memory
as used in the Apollo guidance computer systems -- hand-woven by "little old ladies". Amazing
core-memory  memory  rope-core  guidance  apollo  space  nasa  history  1960s  via:hn 
april 2014 by jm
VERY high resolution scans of original Apollo 11 and Apollo 14 charts
the Apollo 11 ALO and LM Descent Monitoring charts are tidied up and downloadable
apollo  space  history  memorabilia  images  scans  science  nasa 
april 2014 by jm
Goodnight Clock
Burrito Justice nerds out on 'Goodnight Moon'. 'Maybe the bunny and the old lady are actually in a space elevator, getting closer to the moon as he gets into bed? Or as suggested by @transitmaps, the bunny can bend space and time? I do not have a good answer to this conundrum, but that is what the comments are for.'
goodnight-moon  moon  space  time  space-elevators  childrens-books  books  physics 
march 2014 by jm
Save 10% on rymdkapsel on Steam
rymdkapsel is a game where you take command of a space station and its minions. You will have to plan your expansion and manage your resources to explore the galaxy.


recommended by JK.
steam  games  recommended  space  gaming 
january 2014 by jm
Sux
Some basic succinct data structures. [...] The main highlights are:
a novel, broadword-based implementation of rank/select queries for up to 264 bits that is highly competitive with known 32-bit implementations on 64-bit architectures (additional space required is 25% for ranking and 12.5%-37.5% for selection);
several Java structures using the Elias–Fano representation of monotone sequences for storing pointers, variable-length bit arrays, etc.
Java code implementing minimal perfect hashing using around 2.68 bits per element (also using some broadword ideas);
a few Java implementations of monotone minimal perfect hashing.
Sux is free software distributed under the GNU Lesser General Public License.
sux  succinct  data-structures  bits  compression  space  coding 
january 2014 by jm
Little-known Apollo 10 incident
'Apollo 10 had a little known incident in flight as evidenced by this transcript.' http://pic.twitter.com/NCZy7OdxDU
poo  turds  space  spaceflight  funny  history  apollo-10  apollo  accidents 
january 2014 by jm
Life on Mars: Irish man signs up for colony mission
Last week, a private space exploration company called Mars One announced that it has shortlisted 1,058 people from 200,000 applicants who wanted to travel to Mars. Roche is the only Irishman on the list. The catch? If he goes, he can never come back.


Mad stuff. Works at the Science Gallery, so a co-worker of a friend, to boot
science-gallery  dublin  ireland  mars-one  mars  one-way-trips  exploration  future  space  science  joseph-roche 
january 2014 by jm
Building a Balanced Universe - EVE Community
Good blog post about EVE's algorithm to load-balance a 3D map of star systems
eve  eve-online  algorithms  3d  space  load-balancing  sharding  games 
december 2013 by jm
Asteroid "mining" with Linux and FOSS
Planetary Resources is a company with a sky-high (some might claim "pie in the sky") goal: to find and mine asteroids for useful minerals and other compounds. It is also a company that uses Linux and lots of free software. So two of the engineers from Planetary Resources, Ray Ramadorai and Marc Allen, gave a presentation at LinuxCon North America to describe how and why the company uses FOSS—along with a bit about what it is trying to do overall.
lwn  mining  planets  asteroids  space  linux  foss  open-source 
october 2013 by jm
Project Voldemort: measuring BDB space consumption
HOWTO measure this using the BDB-JE command line tools. this is exposed through JMX as the CleanerBacklog metric, too, I think, but good to bookmark just in case
voldemort  cleaner  bdb  ops  space  storage  monitoring  debug 
june 2013 by jm
SpaceX software dev practices
Metrics rule the roost -- I guess there's been a long history of telemetry in space applications.

To make software more visible, you need to know what it is doing, he said, which means creating "metrics on everything you can think of".... Those metrics should cover areas like performance, network utilization, CPU load, and so on.

The metrics gathered, whether from testing or real-world use, should be stored as it is "incredibly valuable" to be able to go back through them, he said. For his systems, telemetry data is stored with the program metrics, as is the version of all of the code running so that everything can be reproduced if needed.

SpaceX has programs to parse the metrics data and raise an alarm when "something goes bad". It is important to automate that, Rose said, because forcing a human to do it "would suck". The same programs run on the data whether it is generated from a developer's test, from a run on the spacecraft, or from a mission. Any failures should be seen as an opportunity to add new metrics. It takes a while to "get into the rhythm" of doing so, but it is "very useful". He likes to "geek out on error reporting", using tools like libSegFault and ftrace.

Automation is important, and continuous integration is "very valuable", Rose said. He suggested building for every platform all of the time, even for "things you don't use any more". SpaceX does that and has found interesting problems when building unused code. Unit tests are run from the continuous integration system any time the code changes. "Everyone here has 100% unit test coverage", he joked, but running whatever tests are available, and creating new ones is useful. When he worked on video games, they had a test to just "warp" the character to random locations in a level and had it look in the four directions, which regularly found problems.

"Automate process processes", he said. Things like coding standards, static analysis, spaces vs. tabs, or detecting the use of Emacs should be done automatically. SpaceX has a complicated process where changes cannot be made without tickets, code review, signoffs, and so forth, but all of that is checked automatically. If static analysis is part of the workflow, make it such that the code will not build unless it passes that analysis step.

When the build fails, it should "fail loudly" with a "monitor that starts flashing red" and email to everyone on the team. When that happens, you should "respond immediately" to fix the problem. In his team, they have a full-size Justin Bieber cutout that gets placed facing the team member who broke the build. They found that "100% of software engineers don't like Justin Bieber", and will work quickly to fix the build problem.
spacex  dev  coding  metrics  deplyment  production  space  justin-bieber 
march 2013 by jm
Goonwaffe Stories: A Guide For Newbies [PDF]
impressively high-quality newbie's guide from the Goonswarm Federation -- as themittani.com describes it, 'frankly a work of art: a 1950's Pulp Scifi magazine full of internet spaceships and sociopathy.'
eve-online  space  goonswarm  gaming  mmo  pdf  pulp  science-fiction 
february 2013 by jm
NunatsiaqOnline 2012-09-06: The First Non-Inuk on the Moon

No, I am not a conspiracy theorist who believes that Armstrong’s moon landing was faked at some mysterious location in the Nevada desert. Armstrong reached the moon. But his accolades are undeserved because he was not first. All right-thinking Nunavummiut know this, because we know that Inuit regularly visited the moon for centuries.

David Iqaqrialu said as much in a heated exchange in the Nunavut legislature on May 6, 2002. We know it was heated because he prefaced his remarks by telling the Speaker, “I am starting to get hot under the collar...”

He then went on to say, as reported in Hansard, “...it is not really related to the question that I posed, but this is background material. Inuit had reached the moon quite some time ago during the shamanistic ages, prior to the Americans reaching it with their machines and finding out it wasn’t what they thought it was.”


(via Dave Walsh)
inuit  via:daev  shaman  nunavut  neil-armstrong  moon  space  exploration 
september 2012 by jm
satellite rescue abandoned due to patents
'SES and Lockheed Martin explored ways to attempt to bring the functioning [AMC-14] satellite into its correct orbital position, and subsequently began attempting to move the satellite into geosynchronous orbit by means of a lunar flyby (as done a decade earlier with HGS-1). In April 2008, it was announced that this had been abandoned after it was discovered that Boeing held a patent on the trajectory that would be required. At the time, a lawsuit was ongoing between SES and Boeing, and Boeing refused to allow the trajectory to be used unless SES dropped its case.' In. credible. http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/Boeing_Patent_Shuts_Down_AMC_14_Lunar_Flyby_Salvage_Attempt_999.html notes 'Industry sources have told SpaceDaily that the patent is regarded as legal "trite", as basic physics has been rebranded as a "process", and that the patent wouldn't stand up to any significant level of court scrutiny and was only registered at the time as "the patent office was incompetent when it came to space matters"', but still -- who'd want to go up in court against Boeing?
boeing  space  patenting  via:hn  funny  sad  lockheed-martin  ses  amc-14  business-process  patents 
may 2012 by jm
Project HGG: FAQ
Hackerspace Global Grid -- 'We want to understand, build and make available satellite based communication for the hackerspace community and all of mankind.' Space is the place!
space  ccc  satellite  communication  internet  hackerspace 
january 2012 by jm
collectSPACE
'The Source for Space History and Artifacts' -- and just in time for xmas too!
space  spaaace  memorabilia  collecting  gomi  tat  artifacts  ebay  science  xmas 
november 2011 by jm
The Moon Museum
a Grumman engineer, working with artist Frosty Myers, hid a tiny ceramic plate of modern art on one leg of the Apollo 12 moon lander -- including a crude penis drawn by Andy Warhol
1960s  art  culture  funny  hack  history  museums  space  nasa  apollo  andy-warhol  from delicious
november 2010 by jm
Ireland at night
the real deal -- a photo of Ireland, at night, from the ISS. I always assumed those patches of light were exagerrated for effect, but they're genuine!
ireland  iss  light  night  space  photos  from delicious
november 2010 by jm
Apollo 11 Saturn V Launch (HD) Camera E-8 on Vimeo
'This clip is raw from Camera E-8 on the launch umbilical tower/mobile launch program of Apollo 11, July 16, 1969. This is an HD transfer from the 16mm original. The camera is running at 500 fps, making the total clip of over 8 minutes represent just 30 seconds of actual time.'
wow  video  space  saturn-v  apollo-11  apollo-program  hd  from delicious
april 2010 by jm
Charlie's Diary: The myth of the starship
Charlie Stross' thoughts on the true viability of interstellar travel. This was about the most thought-provoking bit of 'Accelerando' for me alright
beans  ships  travel  interstellar  space  ai  downloading  from delicious
november 2009 by jm

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