jm + signal   3

wifiscan.py
A neat kragen hack:
Report wireless signal strength using audio synthesis.

This quick kludge is useful for figuring out where the dead spots in
your wireless network coverage are. They’re where the pitch goes high
and maybe you start getting clicks from audio buffer underruns.

Example audio output can be found at
<http://canonical.org/~kragen/sw/wifiscan.ogg>.

This is based on a brilliant hack by Seth Schoen, in which he
generated a tone controlled by the signal strength indication from his
wireless card in order to get a sort of 21st-century software
Theremin. This adds some envelope modulation so that it’s useful as a
network diagnostic tool rather than a musical instrument.

It depends on PulseAudio and the interface to the usual set of Linux
commands: pacat, ping, and iwconfig. (I should really just read
/proc/net/wireless instead of depending on iwconfig.)
kragen  wifi  scanning  audio  sound  signal  linux 
10 days ago by jm
Open Whisper Systems >> Blog >> Reflections: The ecosystem is moving
Very interesting post on federation vs centralization for new services:
One of the controversial things we did with Signal early on was to build it as an unfederated service. Nothing about any of the protocols we've developed requires centralization; it's entirely possible to build a federated Signal Protocol based messenger, but I no longer believe that it is possible to build a competitive federated messenger at all.
development  encryption  communication  network-effects  federation  signal  ip  protocols  networking  smtp  platforms 
may 2016 by jm
Keeping Your Car Safe From Electronic Thieves - NYTimes.com
In a normal scenario, when you walk up to a car with a keyless entry and try the door handle, the car wirelessly calls out for your key so you don’t have to press any buttons to get inside. If the key calls back, the door unlocks. But the keyless system is capable of searching for a key only within a couple of feet. Mr. Danev said that when the teenage girl turned on her device, it amplified the distance that the car can search, which then allowed my car to talk to my key, which happened to be sitting about 50 feet away, on the kitchen counter. And just like that, open sesame.


What the hell -- who designed a system that would auto-unlock based on signal strength alone?!!
security  fail  cars  keys  signal  proximity  keyless-entry  prius  toyota  crime  amplification  power-amplifiers  3db  keyless 
april 2015 by jm

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