jm + serialization   10

Schema evolution in Avro, Protocol Buffers and Thrift
Good description of this key feature of decent serialization formats
avro  thrift  protobuf  schemas  serialization  coding  interop  compatibility 
january 2016 by jm
Release Protocol Buffers v3.0.0-alpha-2 · google/protobuf
New major-version track for protobuf, with some interesting new features:

Removal of field presence logic for primitive value fields, removal of required fields, and removal of default values. This makes proto3 significantly easier to implement with open struct representations, as in languages like Android Java, Objective C, or Go.
Removal of unknown fields.
Removal of extensions, which are instead replaced by a new standard type called Any.
Fix semantics for unknown enum values.
Addition of maps.
Addition of a small set of standard types for representation of time, dynamic data, etc.
A well-defined encoding in JSON as an alternative to binary proto encoding.
protobuf  binary  marshalling  serialization  google  grpc  proto3  coding  open-source 
february 2015 by jm
Cap'n Proto, FlatBuffers, and SBE
a feature comparison of these new serialization formats from Kenton, the capnp dude
serialization  protobuf  capnproto  sbe  flatbuffers  google  coding  storage 
june 2014 by jm
FlatBuffers: Main Page
A new serialization format from Google's Android gaming team, supporting C++ and Java, open source under the ASL v2. Reasons to use it:
Access to serialized data without parsing/unpacking - What sets FlatBuffers apart is that it represents hierarchical data in a flat binary buffer in such a way that it can still be accessed directly without parsing/unpacking, while also still supporting data structure evolution (forwards/backwards compatibility).
Memory efficiency and speed - The only memory needed to access your data is that of the buffer. It requires 0 additional allocations. FlatBuffers is also very suitable for use with mmap (or streaming), requiring only part of the buffer to be in memory. Access is close to the speed of raw struct access with only one extra indirection (a kind of vtable) to allow for format evolution and optional fields. It is aimed at projects where spending time and space (many memory allocations) to be able to access or construct serialized data is undesirable, such as in games or any other performance sensitive applications. See the benchmarks for details.
Flexible - Optional fields means not only do you get great forwards and backwards compatibility (increasingly important for long-lived games: don't have to update all data with each new version!). It also means you have a lot of choice in what data you write and what data you don't, and how you design data structures.
Tiny code footprint - Small amounts of generated code, and just a single small header as the minimum dependency, which is very easy to integrate. Again, see the benchmark section for details.
Strongly typed - Errors happen at compile time rather than manually having to write repetitive and error prone run-time checks. Useful code can be generated for you.
Convenient to use - Generated C++ code allows for terse access & construction code. Then there's optional functionality for parsing schemas and JSON-like text representations at runtime efficiently if needed (faster and more memory efficient than other JSON parsers).


Looks nice, but it misses the language coverage of protobuf. Definitely more practical than capnproto.
c++  google  java  serialization  json  formats  protobuf  capnproto  storage  flatbuffers 
june 2014 by jm
'Pickles & Spores: Improving Support for Distributed Programming in Scala
'Spores are "small units of possibly mobile functional behavior". They're a closure-like abstraction meant for use in distributed or concurrent environments. Spores provide a guarantee that the environment is effectively immutable, and safe to ship over the wire. Spores aim to give library authors some confidence in exposing functions (or, rather, spores) in public APIs for safe consumption in a distributed or concurrent environment.

The first part of the talk covers a simpler variant of spores as they are proposed for inclusion in Scala 2.11. The second part of the talk briefly introduces a current research project ongoing at EPFL which leverages Scala's type system to provide type constraints that give authors finer-grained control over spore capturing semantics. What's more, these type constraints can be composed during spore composition, so library authors are effectively able to propagate expert knowledge via these composable constraints.

The last part of the talk briefly covers Scala/Pickling, a fast new, open serialization framework.'
pickling  scala  presentations  spores  closures  fp  immutability  coding  distributed  distcomp  serialization  formats  network 
april 2014 by jm
"Understanding the Robustness of SSDs under Power Fault", FAST '13 [paper]
Horrific. SSDs (including "enterprise-class storage") storing sync'd writes in volatile RAM while claiming they were synced; one device losing 72.6GB, 30% of its data, after 8 injected power faults; and all SSDs tested displayed serious errors including random bit errors, metadata corruption, serialization errors and shorn writes. Don't trust lone unreplicated, unbacked-up SSDs!
pdf  papers  ssd  storage  reliability  safety  hardware  ops  usenix  serialization  shorn-writes  bit-errors  corruption  fsync 
january 2014 by jm
Simple Binary Encoding
'SBE is an OSI layer 6 representation for encoding and decoding application messages in binary format for low-latency applications.'

Licensed under ASL2, C++ and Java supported.
sbe  encoding  codecs  persistence  binary  low-latency  open-source  java  c++  serialization 
december 2013 by jm
Cap'n Proto
Cap’n Proto is an insanely fast data interchange format and capability-based RPC system. Think JSON, except binary. Or think Protocol Buffers, except faster. In fact, in benchmarks, Cap’n Proto is INFINITY TIMES faster than Protocol Buffers.


Basically, marshalling like writing an aligned C struct to the wire, QNX messaging protocol-style. Wasteful on space, but responds to this by suggesting compression (which is a fair point tbh). C++-only for now. I'm not seeing the same kind of support for optional data that protobufs has though. Overall I'm worried there's some useful features being omitted here...
serialization  formats  protobufs  capn-proto  protocols  coding  c++  rpc  qnx  messaging  compression  compatibility  interoperability  i14y 
april 2013 by jm
Introducing BERT and BERT-RPC
another serialization format, binary, no IDL, no code generation, from GitHub
github  bert  erlang  ruby  rpc  protocol  thrift  serialization  networking  from delicious
october 2009 by jm

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