jm + secrecy   4

Register article on Amazon's attitude to open source
This article is frequently on target; this secrecy (both around open source and publishing papers) was one of the reasons I left Amazon.
Of the sources with whom we spoke, many indicated that Amazon's lack of participation was a key reason for why people left the company – or never joined at all. This is why Amazon's strategy of maintaining secrecy may derail the e-retailer's future if it struggles to hire the best talent. [...]

"In many cases in the big companies and all the small startups, your Github profile is your resume," explained another former Amazonian. "When I look at developers that's what I'm looking for, [but] they go to Amazon and that resume stops ... It absolutely affects the quality of their hires." "You had no portfolio you could share with the world," said another insider on life after working at Amazon. "The argument this was necessary to attract talent and to retain talent completely fell on deaf ears."
amazon  recruitment  secrecy  open-source  hiring  work  research  conferences 
january 2014 by jm
Killing Freedom of Information in Ireland will, in all likelihood, cease all FOI requests. And we will not seek funding from the public to support an immoral, cynical, unjustified and probably illegal FOI fee regime. We will not pay for information that the public already pays for. We will not support a system that perpetuates an outrageous infringement of citizen rights. The legislation was gutted in 2003 and it is being gutted again. More generally the number of requests from journalists from all news organisations in Ireland will fall as a result of these amendments, and the resulting efforts to shine a light on the administration of the State will certainly deteriorate. And secrecy will prevail.
ireland  politics  foi  information  secrecy  law 
november 2013 by jm
Edward Snowden's E-Mail Provider Defied FBI Demands to Turn Over SSL Keys, Documents Show
Levison lost [in secret court against the government's order]. In a work-around, Levison complied the next day by turning over the private SSL keys as an 11 page printout in 4-point type. The government called the printout “illegible” and the court ordered Levison to provide a more useful electronic copy.

Nice try though! Bottom line is they demanded the SSL private key. (via Waxy)
government  privacy  security  ssl  tls  crypto  fbi  via:waxy  secrecy  snooping 
october 2013 by jm
Interpol filter scope creep: ASIC ordering unilateral website blocks
Bloody hell. This is stupidity of the highest order, and a canonical example of "filter creep" by a government -- secret state censorship of 1200 websites due to a single investment scam site.

The Federal Government has confirmed its financial regulator has started requiring Australian Internet service providers to block websites suspected of providing fraudulent financial opportunities, in a move which appears to also open the door for other government agencies to unilaterally block sites they deem questionable in their own portfolios.

The instrument through which the ISPs are blocking the Interpol list of sites is Section 313 of the Telecommunications Act. Under the Act, the Australian Federal Police is allowed to issue notices to telcos asking for reasonable assistance in upholding the law. [...] Tonight Senator Conroy’s office revealed that the incident that resulted in Melbourne Free University and more than a thousand other sites being blocked originated from a different source — financial regulator the Australian Securities and Investment Commission.

On 22 March this year, ASIC issued a media release warning consumers about the activities of a cold-calling investment scam using the name ‘Global Capital Wealth’, which ASIC said was operating several fraudulent websites — and In its release on that date, ASIC stated: “ASIC has already blocked access to these websites.”
scams  australia  filtering  filter-creep  false-positives  isps  asic  fraud  secrecy 
may 2013 by jm

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