jm + scams   31

Intuit and H&R Block Are Spending Millions to Keep Us From Having Simpler Tax Forms
I noticed this when I was living there -- it was nearly impossible to file a 1040 without help, and this is why:
Intuit spent more than $2 million lobbying last year, much of it spent on legislation that would permanently bar the government from offering taxpayers pre-filled returns. H&R Block spent $3 million, also directing some of their efforts toward the bill.


On the upside, with H&R Block it's reasonably easy. Just pretty unpleasant that it's a requirement and effectively private-sector taxation as a result.
h-r-block  intuit  taxes  us-politics  lobbying  scams  usa 
8 weeks ago by jm
Contactless credit cards vulnerable to a range of scams
Johanson said it's possible to use an RFID "gate antenna" — two electronic readers spanning a doorway, similar to the anti-theft gates in retail stores — to scan the credit cards of people passing through. 
With enough high-powered gates installed at key doorways in a city or across the country, someone could collect comprehensive information on people's movements, buying habits and social patterns.
"These days you can buy a $500 antenna to mount in doorways that can read every card that goes through it," Johanson said.


Amazingly, these seem to be rife with holes -- they still use the legacy EMV protocol, do not require online verification with backend systems, and allow replay attacks. A Journal.ie article today claims that attackers are sniffing EMV data, then replaying it against card readers in shops in Dublin, which while it may not be true, the attack certainly seems viable...
rfid  security  scams  emv  wireless  contactless  credit-cards  replay-attacks 
december 2016 by jm
How Macedonia Became A Global Hub For Pro-Trump Misinformation - BuzzFeed News
“I started the site for a easy way to make money,” said a 17-year-old who runs a site [from Veles] with four other people. “In Macedonia the economy is very weak and teenagers are not allowed to work, so we need to find creative ways to make some money. I’m a musician but I can’t afford music gear. Here in Macedonia the revenue from a small site is enough to afford many things.”
macedonia  veles  scams  facebook  misinformation  donald-trump  us-politics 
november 2016 by jm
Mt. Gox had a chair worth $28,000
According to the bankruptcy documents, one of the assets listed is 'a chair worth 2,902,119JPY, or roughly $28,000USD.'
chairs  funny  mtgox  scams  bitcoin  furniture  assets  bankruptcy 
october 2016 by jm
the Wire-Wire fraud
'Researchers learn about wire-fraud scam after Nigerian scammers infect themselves with their own malware.'
The researchers observed Wire-Wire scores of $5,000 to $250,000 with the average between $30,000-$50,000 from small- and medium-sized businesses. The scammers themselves were "well-respected and admired" in their communities.


I've heard about this scam -- it's nasty, and worst of all, banks won't reimburse the losses.
scams  fraud  wire-wire  nigeria  malware  banking 
august 2016 by jm
Ex-surgeon duped into being €100k drug mule
Oh man. This is so sad:

Soriano, who had travelled to Ireland from Bogota via Panama and Paris, told customs officials that a red bag he was carrying contained a gift for banking officials which would facilitate the transfer of a $2.3m inheritance from a long-lost relative he had never heard of until recently. He was very co-operative with the officials and agreed to allow them x-ray and examine the bag. It was found to contain 1.86kg of cocaine in three packets.

Sgt Finnegan said gardaí were initially sceptical that Soriano could have fallen for the scam but, as interviews went on, they became aware that there were underlying issues. Gardaí found documentation that Soriano had printed out about other phishing scams. He said that he knew they were scams but he was lonely and would respond to them for “a little bit of fun”. Sgt Finnegan said that, despite this, he remained adamant that the inheritance was still due to be claimed.


Bizarrely not the first prominent surgeon to fall victim to 419 scammers.
419  scams  cocaine  smuggling  surgeons  phishing  dementia 
may 2016 by jm
£25,000 stolen online. But even more shocking: Barclays washes its hands of it | Money | The Guardian
UK banks are getting press for evading liability and screwing the customer when scams and phishing occur
scams  phishing  uk  banking  banks  liability  terms-and-conditions  barclays 
march 2016 by jm
An Analysis of Reshipping Mule Scams
We observed that the vast majority of the re-shipped packages end up in the Moscow, Russia area, and that the goods purchased with stolen credit cards span multiple categories, from expensive electronics such as Apple products, to designer clothes, to DSLR cameras and even weapon accessories. Given the amount of goods shipped by the reshipping mule sites that we analysed, the annual revenue generated from such operations can span between 1.8 and 7.3 million US dollars. The overall losses are much higher though: the online merchant loses an expensive item from its inventory and typically has to refund the owner of the stolen credit card. In addition, the rogue goods typically travel labeled as “second hand goods” and therefore custom taxes are also evaded. Once the items purchased with stolen credit cards reach their destination they will be sold on the black market by cybercriminals. [...] When applying for the job, people are usually required to send the operator copies of their ID cards and passport. After they are hired, mules are promised to be paid at the end of their first month of employment. However, from our data it is clear that mules are usually never paid. After their first month expires, they are never contacted back by the operator, who just moves on and hires new mules. In other words, the mules become victims of this scam themselves, by never seeing a penny. Moreover, because they sent copies of their documents to the criminals, mules can potentially become victims of identity theft.
crime  law  cybercrime  mules  shipping-scams  identity-theft  russia  moscow  scams  papers 
november 2015 by jm
Chinese scammers are now using Stingray tech to SMS-phish
A Stingray-style false GSM base station, hidden in a backpack; presumably they detect numbers in the vicinity, and SMS-spam those numbers with phishing messages. Reportedly the scammers used this trick in "Guangzhou, Zhuhai, Shenzhen, Changsha, Wuhan, Zhengzhou and other densely populated cities".

Dodgy machine translation:
March 26, Zhengzhou police telecommunications fraud cases together, for the first time seized a small backpack can hide pseudo station equipment, and arrested two suspects. Yesterday, the police informed of this case, to remind the general public to pay attention to prevention.

“I am the landlord, I changed number, please rent my wife hit the bank card, card number ×××, username ××.” Recently, Jiefang Road, Zhengzhou City Public Security Bureau police station received a number of cases for investigation brigade area of ​​the masses police said, frequently received similar phone scam messages. Alarm, the police investigators to determine: the suspect may be in the vicinity of twenty-seven square, large-scale use of mobile pseudo-base release fraudulent information. [...]

Yesterday afternoon, the Jiefang Road police station, the reporter saw the portable pseudo-base is made up of two batteries, a set-top box the size of the antenna box and a chassis, as well as a pocket computer composed together at most 5 kg.


(via t byfield and Danny O'Brien)
via:mala  via:tbyfield  privacy  scams  phishing  sms  gsm  stingray  base-stations  mobile  china 
august 2015 by jm
Bank of the Underworld - The Atlantic
Prosecutors analyzed approximately 500 of Liberty Reserve’s biggest accounts, which constituted 44 percent of its business. The government contends that 32 of these accounts were connected to the sale of stolen credit cards and 117 were used by Ponzi-scheme operators. All of this activity flourished, prosecutors said, because Liberty Reserve made no real effort to monitor its users for criminal behavior. What’s more, records showed that one of the company’s top tech experts, Mark Marmilev, who was also arrested, appeared to have promoted Liberty Reserve in chat rooms devoted to Ponzi schemes.


(via Nelson)
scams  fraud  crime  currency  the-atlantic  liberty-reserve  ponzi-schemes  costa-rica  arthur-budovsky  banking  anonymity  cryptocurrency  money-laundering  carding 
april 2015 by jm
Why We Will Not Be Registering easyDNS.SUCKS - blog.easydns.org
If you're not immersed in the naming business you may find the jargon in it hard to understand. The basic upshot is this: the IPC believes that the mechanisms that were enacted to protect trademark holders during the deluge of new TLD rollouts are being gamed by the .SUCKS TLD operator to extort inflated fees from trademark holders.


(via Nelson)
shakedown  business  internet  domains  dns  easydns  dot-sucks  scams  tlds  trademarks  ip 
april 2015 by jm
Mars One finalist Dr. Joseph Roche rips into the project
So, here are the facts as we understand them: Mars One has almost no money. Mars One has no contracts with private aerospace suppliers who are building technology for future deep-space missions. Mars One has no TV production partner. Mars One has no publicly known investment partnerships with major brands. Mars One has no plans for a training facility where its candidates would prepare themselves. Mars One’s candidates have been vetted by a single person, in a 10-minute Skype interview.

“My nightmare about it is that people continue to support it and give it money and attention, and it then gets to the point where it inevitably falls on its face,” said Roche. If, as a result, “people lose faith in NASA and possibly even in scientists, then that’s the polar opposite of what I’m about. If I was somehow linked to something that could do damage to the public perception of science, that is my nightmare scenario.”
science  space  mars-one  tcd  joseph-roche  nasa  mars  exploration  scams 
march 2015 by jm
Some UX Dark Patterns now illegal in the EU
The EU’s new consumer rights law bans certain dark patterns related to e-commerce across Europe. The “sneak into basket” pattern is now illegal. Full stop, end of story. You cannot create a situation where additional items and services are added by default. [...]

Hidden costs are now illegal, whether that’s an undeclared subscription, extra shipping charges, or extra items. [....]

Forced continuity, when imposed on the user as a form of bait-and-switch, has been banned. Just the other day a web designer mentioned to me that he had only just discovered he had been charged for four years of annual membership dues in a “theme club”, having bought what he thought was a one-off theme. Since he lives in Europe, he may be able to claim all of this money back. All he needs to do is prove that the website did not inform him that the purchase included a membership with recurring payments.
design  europe  law  ecommerce  ux  dark-patterns  scams  ryanair  selling  online  consumer  consumer-rights  bait-and-switch 
september 2014 by jm
Nanex: "The stock market is rigged" [by HFTs]
All this evidence points to one inescapable conclusion: the order cancellations and trade executions just before, and during the trader's order were not a coincidence. This is premeditated, programmed theft, plain and simple. Michael Lewis probably said it best when he told 60 Minutes that the stock market is rigged.


Nanex have had enough, basically. Mad stuff.
hft  stocks  finance  market  trading  nanex  60-minutes  michael-lewis  scams  sec  regulation  low-latency  exploits  hacks 
july 2014 by jm
Who Made That Nigerian Scam? - NYTimes.com
The history behind the 419 advance-fee fraud scam.
According to Robert Whitaker, a historian at the University of Texas, an earlier version of the con, known as the Spanish Swindle or the Spanish Prisoner trick, plagued Britain throughout the 19th century.
nigerian-scam  419  aff  scams  spam  fraud  history 
january 2014 by jm
Jesse Willms, the Dark Lord of the Internet - Taylor Clark - The Atlantic
“It was an out-and-out hijacking,” LeFevre told me. “They counterfeited our product, they pirated our Web site, and they basically directed all of their customer service to us.” At the peak of Willms’s sales, LeFevre says, dazzlesmile was receiving 1,000 calls a day from customers trying to cancel orders for a product it didn’t even sell. When irate consumers made the name dazzlesmile synonymous with online scamming, LeFevre’s sales effectively dropped to zero. Dazzlesmile sued Willms in November 2009; he later paid a settlement.
scams  hijacking  ads  affiliate  one-wierd-trick  health  dieting  crime 
december 2013 by jm
Herbal supplements are often 'rice and weeds'
DNA tests show that many pills labeled as healing herbs are little more than powdered rice and weeds. [...] Among their findings were bottles of echinacea supplements, used by millions of Americans to prevent and treat colds, that contained ground up bitter weed, Parthenium hysterophorus, an invasive plant found in India and Australia that has been linked to rashes, nausea and flatulence.
herbal-remedies  scams  quality  medicine  dna  testing  fillers  allergies  st-johns-wort  echinacea 
november 2013 by jm
Experian Sold Consumer Data to ID Theft Service
This is what happens when you don't have strong controls on data protection/data privacy -- the US experience.
While [posing as a US-based private investigator] may have gotten the [Vietnam-based gang operating the massive identity fraud site Superget.info] past Experian and/or CourtVentures’ screening process, according to Martin there were other signs that should have alerted Experian to potential fraud associated with the account. For example, Martin said the Secret Service told him that the alleged proprietor of Superget.info had paid Experian for his monthly data access charges using wire transfers sent from Singapore.

“The issue in my mind was the fact that this went on for almost a year after Experian did their due diligence and purchased” Court Ventures, Martin said. “Why didn’t they question cash wires coming in every month? Experian portrays themselves as the data-breach experts, and they sell identity theft protection services. How this could go on without them detecting it I don’t know. Our agreement with them was that our information was to be used for fraud prevention and ID verification, and was only to be sold to licensed and credentialed U.S. businesses, not to someone overseas.”


via Simon McGarr
via:tupp_ed  privacy  security  crime  data-protection  data-privacy  experian  data-breaches  courtventures  superget  scams  fraud  identity  identity-theft 
october 2013 by jm
Intellectual Ventures' Evil Knows No Bounds: Buys Patent AmEx Donated For Public Good... And Starts Suing
The problem with software patents, part XVII.
So you have a situation where even when the original patent holder donated the patent for "the public good," sooner or later, an obnoxious patent troll like IV comes along and turns it into a weapon.
Again: AmEx patented those little numbers on your credit card, and then for the good of the industry and consumer protection donated the patent to a non-profit, who promised not to enforce the patent against banks... and then proceeded to sell the patent to Intellectual Ventures who is now suing banks over it.
intellectual-ventures  scams  patents  swpats  shakedown  banking  cvv  american-express  banks  amex  cmaf 
october 2013 by jm
Interpol filter scope creep: ASIC ordering unilateral website blocks
Bloody hell. This is stupidity of the highest order, and a canonical example of "filter creep" by a government -- secret state censorship of 1200 websites due to a single investment scam site.

The Federal Government has confirmed its financial regulator has started requiring Australian Internet service providers to block websites suspected of providing fraudulent financial opportunities, in a move which appears to also open the door for other government agencies to unilaterally block sites they deem questionable in their own portfolios.

The instrument through which the ISPs are blocking the Interpol list of sites is Section 313 of the Telecommunications Act. Under the Act, the Australian Federal Police is allowed to issue notices to telcos asking for reasonable assistance in upholding the law. [...] Tonight Senator Conroy’s office revealed that the incident that resulted in Melbourne Free University and more than a thousand other sites being blocked originated from a different source — financial regulator the Australian Securities and Investment Commission.

On 22 March this year, ASIC issued a media release warning consumers about the activities of a cold-calling investment scam using the name ‘Global Capital Wealth’, which ASIC said was operating several fraudulent websites — www.globalcapitalwealth.com and www.globalcapitalaustralia.com. In its release on that date, ASIC stated: “ASIC has already blocked access to these websites.”
scams  australia  filtering  filter-creep  false-positives  isps  asic  fraud  secrecy 
may 2013 by jm
McGarr Solicitors' sternly-worded letter to Newspaper Licencing Ireland Ltd
In response to a letter received by a charity, warning of dire penalties for 'reproducing copyright content without permission', since doing so 'is theft'. It gets better, since in correspondence they were then informed that “a licence is required to link directly to an online article even without uploading any of the content directly onto your own website”. Looking forward to seeing how this one plays out...
law  ireland  scams  shakedown  copyright  nli  licensing  linking  hyperlinks 
may 2012 by jm
Bondholders safe even if opposition win election - European, Business - Independent.ie
'<br />
In a private phone call this week with hedge funds and other investors from across Europe, the EU team which negotiated Ireland's rescue package, reassured the firms that senior bondholders cannot be burned as part of the €85bn rescue package, even if Fine Gael and Labour seek to reopen the question.'  Argh! this makes me so angry
bondholders  ireland  economy  bailout  scams  from delicious
december 2010 by jm
Ca'n Quiros, Soller, Spain
many atrocious TripAdvisor reviews of this kip which ripped us off heavily last week. looking forward to adding my $.02. roll on data roaming limits so I can check TA via 3G before we sit down ;)
restaurants  food  soller  spain  rip-offs  scams  dodgy  tripadvisor  from delicious
may 2010 by jm
Cory Doctorow: Persistence Pays Parasites
'Falling victim to a [phish] isn’t just a matter of not being wise to the ways of the world: it’s a matter of being caught out in a moment of distraction and of unlikely circumstance.' +1, that matches with the personal phishing stories I've heard from others
phishing  cory-doctorow  security  anti-phishing  scams  distraction  twitter  from delicious
may 2010 by jm
ScamNailer - Anti-Phishing Filter
a generated set of SpamAssassin rules containing known-phisher addresses
scams  phishing  spear-phishing  spamassassin  rules  anti-phishing  from delicious
april 2010 by jm
Boingo Wireless - AVOID
argh. wish I'd seen this page before I signed up for a month's access while travelling -- they've now charged my credit card again, over a week after I requested the account's cancellation :(
boingo  avoid  customer-service  customer-hostile  scams  wifi  travel  from delicious
november 2009 by jm
Cybercrime Organizations Turn to ‘Mafia-Style’ Structure
good research coming out of McAfee -- lots of Eastern European, Russian, and ex-USSR-country cybercrime businesses nowadays, apparently
spam  scams  scareware  russia  eastern-europe  ukraine  romania  credit-cards  antivirus  mcafee  security  phishing  from delicious
october 2009 by jm
background on Yahoozee
bit of controversy about Colin Powell dancing (!) to a song that promotes the "Yahoo boys", 419 scammers -- but it doesn't sound like that's the case, going by this post
419  scams  fraud  spam  nigeria  colin-powell  yahoo  yahoozee 
august 2009 by jm

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