jm + russia   33

UK government planning to require age verification for access to porn
This thread has pointed out the unintentional side effect which I hadn't considered: this database of user auth info and their porn habits will be an incredibly valuable target for foreign governments and hackers, and a single foreign porn company owns the AV service they are potentially planning to use for it.

"if they can't find a way to de-link identities from usage, this is a monumental national security risk and it's beyond insane they're even considering it. "Sorry Prime Minister, Russia now knows what porn every MP, civil servant and clearance holder watches and when, and we don't know how much of it they've given to Wikileaks. In retrospect, having the world's most obvious SIGINT target built in PHP and hosted in the Cayman Islands by an uncleared foreign 25 year old working for a porn company probably wasn't the best idea".'
age  verification  porn  uk  politics  censorship  security  national-security  wikileaks  russia 
15 days ago by jm
Tech Leaders Dismayed by Weaponization of Social Media - IEEE Spectrum
“We have passed the fail-safe point,” McNamee said. “I don’t think we can get back to the Silicon Valley that I loved. At this point we just have to save America.”
propaganda  fake-news  facebook  twitter  social-media  us-politics  brexit  internet  russia  silicon-valley  usa 
22 days ago by jm
Kremlin info-ops measured to have a total reach of 340 million with dark, divisive ads
when the virality and resharing is measured, it's far higher than previously estimated, according to this Washington Post article
virality  news  fake-news  facebook  politics  russia 
9 weeks ago by jm
Turla’s watering hole campaign: An updated Firefox extension abusing Instagram
Pretty crazy.
The extension will look at each photo’s comment and will compute a custom hash value. If the hash matches 183, it will then run this regular expression on the comment in order to obtain the path of the bit.ly URL:
(?:\\u200d(?:#|@)(\\w)

Looking at the photo’s comments, there was only one for which the hash matches 183. This comment was posted on February 6, while the original photo was posted in early January. Taking the comment and running it through the regex, you get the following bit.ly URL: bit.ly/2kdhuHX

Looking a bit more closely at the regular expression, we see it is looking for either @|# or the Unicode character \200d. This character is actually a non-printable character called ‘Zero Width Joiner’, normally used to separate emojis. Pasting the actual comment or looking at its source, you can see that this character precedes each character that makes the path of the bit.ly URL
security  malware  russia  turla  zwj  unicode  characters  social-media  instagram  command-and-control 
june 2017 by jm
Top-Secret NSA Report Details Russian Hacking Effort Days Before 2016 Election
RUSSIAN MILITARY INTELLIGENCE [GRU] executed a cyberattack on at least one U.S. voting software supplier and sent spear-phishing emails to more than 100 local election officials just days before last November’s presidential election, according to a highly classified intelligence report obtained by The Intercept.

The top-secret National Security Agency document, which was provided anonymously to The Intercept and independently authenticated, analyzes intelligence very recently acquired by the agency about a months-long Russian intelligence cyber effort against elements of the U.S. election and voting infrastructure. The report, dated May 5, 2017, is the most detailed U.S. government account of Russian interference in the election that has yet come to light.
politics  russia  nsa  leaks  us-politics  cyberattacks  gru  hacking  elections  spear-phishing  phishing  e-voting 
june 2017 by jm
Watching the hearings, I learned my "Bernie bro" harassers may have been Russian bots
However, the rest of the abuse came from accounts purporting to be supporters of Vermont Independent Senator Bernie Sanders. And these were “people” with whom I believed I shared common values and policy interests. Almost all of the accounts presented as men — mostly young and white — and used sexist and misogynistic tones and words. I was called “mom” and “grandma” as epithets by these “young men.” I was called every vile sexualized name you can imagine. For some reason that I did not understand at the time, they liked to call me a “vagina.” (I now believe non-native English — i.e. Russian — speakers wrote the algorithms controlling these bots and perhaps imagined “vagina” to be the equivalent of the c-word when hurled at a woman.) Not being conversant in the mechanisms of Russian psychological warfare techniques at the time, it never occurred to me that, like the #MAGA bots, these “Bernie Bro” accounts were actually bots too.
And the abuse from these accounts was much harder to dismiss. It went in further, emotionally speaking. The vitriol of the attacks felt like a painful betrayal. After all, “we” probably shared 99 percent of our political perspective; we just supported different candidates — which is something I said repeatedly in my attempts to appeal to reason with some of the attackers over the course of those long months. Nonetheless, even the mildest criticism of Sanders or comment of support for Clinton would bring out a swarm of these “Bernie Bro” accounts spouting off with abusive language and mockery.
bernie-bros  abuse  twitter  russia  security  bots  elections  hilary-clinton 
april 2017 by jm
American Snoper – Medium
The grugq on Putin vs France:
How modern conflicts play out in the informatics sphere, what I mean when I talk about cyber war, is happening in France. After France there will be Germany, then the Scandinavian countries have their elections. There is no chance that Putin attempting to shape the world to best suit Russian interests will abate. Currently, the strongest area that he can contend in is the informatics sphere, the cyber realm, where human perception of reality is shaped.
putin  france  elections  russia  cyber-war  hacking  security  wikileaks 
march 2017 by jm
The Perfect Weapon: How Russian Cyberpower Invaded the U.S. - The New York Times
This is scary shit. It's amazing how Russia has weaponised transparency, but I guess it's not new to observers of "kompromat": https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kompromat
kompromat  russia  cyberpower  cyberwar  security  trump  us-politics  dnc 
december 2016 by jm
Did the Russians “hack” the election? A look at the established facts | Ars Technica
solid roundup. There's a whole lot of evidence pointing Russia's way, basically
usa  russia  hacking  politics  security  us-politics  trump 
december 2016 by jm
E-Voting in Estonia needs to be discontinued
After studying other e-voting systems around the world, the team was particularly alarmed by the Estonian I-voting system. It has serious design weaknesses that are exacerbated by weak operational management. It has been built on assumptions which are outdated and do not reflect the contemporary reality of state-level attacks and sophisticated cybercrime. These problems stem from fundamental architectural problems that cannot be resolved with quick fixes or interim steps. While we believe e-government has many promising uses, the Estonian I-voting system carries grave risks — elections could be stolen, disrupted, or cast into disrepute. In light of these problems, our urgent recommendation is that to maintain the integrity of the Estonian electoral process, use of the Estonian I-voting system should be immediately discontinued.
internet  technology  e-voting  voting  security  via:mattblaze  estonia  i-voting  russia  cybercrime 
june 2016 by jm
The Rise of Pirate Libraries
The history of this is fascinating:
Today’s pirate libraries have their roots in the work of Russian academics to digitize texts in the 1990s. Scholars in that part of the world had long had a thriving practice of passing literature and scientific information underground, in opposition to government censorship—part of the samizdat culture, in which banned documents were copied and passed hand to hand through illicit channels. Those first digital collections were passed freely around, but when their creators started running into problems with copyright, their collections “retreated from the public view,” writes Balázs Bodó, a piracy researcher based at the University of Amsterdam. “The text collections were far too valuable to simply delete,” he writes, and instead migrated to “closed, membership-only FTP servers.” [....]

There’s always been osmosis within the academic community of copyrighted materials from people with access to scholar without. “Much of the life of a research academic in Kazakhstan or Iran or Malaysia involves this informal diffusion of materials across the gated walls of the top universities,” he says.
pirates  pirate-libraries  libraries  archival  history  russia  ussr  samizdat  samizdata  academia  papers 
april 2016 by jm
An Analysis of Reshipping Mule Scams
We observed that the vast majority of the re-shipped packages end up in the Moscow, Russia area, and that the goods purchased with stolen credit cards span multiple categories, from expensive electronics such as Apple products, to designer clothes, to DSLR cameras and even weapon accessories. Given the amount of goods shipped by the reshipping mule sites that we analysed, the annual revenue generated from such operations can span between 1.8 and 7.3 million US dollars. The overall losses are much higher though: the online merchant loses an expensive item from its inventory and typically has to refund the owner of the stolen credit card. In addition, the rogue goods typically travel labeled as “second hand goods” and therefore custom taxes are also evaded. Once the items purchased with stolen credit cards reach their destination they will be sold on the black market by cybercriminals. [...] When applying for the job, people are usually required to send the operator copies of their ID cards and passport. After they are hired, mules are promised to be paid at the end of their first month of employment. However, from our data it is clear that mules are usually never paid. After their first month expires, they are never contacted back by the operator, who just moves on and hires new mules. In other words, the mules become victims of this scam themselves, by never seeing a penny. Moreover, because they sent copies of their documents to the criminals, mules can potentially become victims of identity theft.
crime  law  cybercrime  mules  shipping-scams  identity-theft  russia  moscow  scams  papers 
november 2015 by jm
The Alternative Universe Of Soviet Arcade Games
Unlike machines in the West, every single machine that was produced during Soviet-era Russia had to align with Marxist ideology. [...] The most popular games were created to teach hand-eye coordination, reaction speed, and logical, focused thinking. Not unlike many American games, these games were influenced by military training, crafted to teach and instill patriotism for the state by making the human body better, stronger, and more willful. It also means no high scores, no adrenaline rushes, or self-serving feather-fluffing as you add your hard-earned initials to the list of the best. In Communist Russia, there was no overt competition.
high-scores  communism  russia  cccp  ussr  arcade-games  games  history 
september 2015 by jm
The Titanium Gambit | History | Air & Space Magazine
Amazing story of 1960s detente via Maciej: 'During the Cold War, Boeing execs got a strange call from the State Department: Would you guys mind trading secrets with the Russians?'
via:maciej  titanium  history  cold-war  detente  ussr  usa  boeing  russia  aerospace 
july 2015 by jm
The Agency - NYTimes.com
Russia's troll farms. Ladies and gentlemen -- the future
future  abuse  trolls  russia  trolling  politics  social-media  twitter  facebook 
june 2015 by jm
Russia just made a ton of Internet memes illegal - The Washington Post
In post-Soviet Russia, you don’t make memes. Memes make (or unmake?) you. That is, at least, the only conclusion we can draw from an announcement made this week by Russia’s three-year-old media agency/Internet censor Roskomnadzor, which made it illegal to publish any Internet meme that depicts a public figure in a way that has nothing to do with his “personality.”
memes  photoshop  russia  freedom  web  internet  funny  humour  roskomnadzor  censorship  sad-keanu 
april 2015 by jm
In Ukraine, Tomorrow’s Drone War Is Alive Today
Drones, hackerspaces and crowdfunding:
The most sophisticated UAV that has come out of the Ukrainian side since the start of the conflict is called the PD-1 from developer Igor Korolenko. It has a wingspan of nearly 10 feet, a five-hour flight time, carries electro-optical and infrared sensors as well as a video camera that broadcasts on a 128 bit encrypted channel. Its most important feature is the autopilot software that allows the drone to return home in the event that the global positioning system link is jammed or lost.

Drone-based intelligence gathering is often depicted as risk-free compared to manned aircraft or human intelligence gathering, but, says Korolenko, if the drone isn’t secure or the signature is too obvious, the human coasts can be very, very high.

“Russian military sometimes track locations of ground control stations,” he wrote Defense One in an email. “Therefore UAV squads have to follow certain security measures - to relocate frequently, to move out antennas and work from shelter, etc. As far as I know, two members of UAV squads were killed from mortar attacks after [their] positions were tracked by Russian electronic warfare equipment.”


(via bldgblog)
via:bldgblog  war  drones  uav  future  ukraine  russia  tech  aircraft  pd-1  crowdfunding 
march 2015 by jm
New Russian Law To Forbid Storing Russians' Data Outside the Country - Slashdot
On Friday Russia's parliament passed a law "which bans online businesses from storing personal data of Russian citizens on servers located abroad[.] ... According to ITAR-TASS, the changes to existing legislation will come into effect in September 2016, and apply to email services, social networks and search engines, including the likes of Facebook and Google. Domain names or net addresses not complying with regulations will be put on a blacklist maintained by Roskomnadzor (the Federal Supervision Agency for Information Technologies and Communications), the organisation which already has the powers to take down websites suspected of copyright infringement without a court order. In the case of non-compliance, Roskomnadzor will be able to impose 'sanctions,' and even instruct local Internet Service Providers (ISPs) to cut off access to the offending resource."
russia  privacy  nsa  censorship  protectionism  internet  web 
july 2014 by jm
Russia passes bill requiring bloggers to register with government
A bill passed by the Russian parliament on Tuesday says that any blogger read by at least 3,000 people a day has to register with the government telecom watchdog and follow the same rules as those imposed by Russian law on mass media. These include privacy safeguards, the obligation to check all facts, silent days before elections and loose but threatening injunctions against "abetting terrorism" and "extremism."


Russian blogging platforms have responded by changing view-counter tickers to display "2500+" as a max.
russia  blogs  blogging  terrorism  extremism  internet  regulation  chilling-effects  censorship 
april 2014 by jm
Russia: Hidden chips 'launch malware attacks from irons'
Cyber criminals are planting chips in electric irons and kettles to launch spam [jm: actually, malware] attacks, reports in Russia suggest. State-owned channel Rossiya 24 even showed footage of a technician opening up an iron included in a batch of Chinese imports to find a "spy chip" with what he called "a little microphone". Its correspondent said the hidden devices were mostly being used to spread viruses, by connecting to any computer within a 200m (656ft) radius which were using unprotected Wi-Fi networks. Other products found to have rogue components reportedly included mobile phones and car dashboard cameras.
wifi  viruses  spam  malware  security  russia  china  toasters  kettles  appliances 
october 2013 by jm
The 1940s origins of Whataboutery
The exchange is indicative of a rhetorical strategy known as 'whataboutism', which occurs when officials implicated in wrongdoing whip out a counter-example of a similar abuse from the accusing country, with the goal of undermining the legitimacy of the criticism itself. (In Latin, this rhetorical defense is called tu quoque, or "you, too.")
history  language  whataboutism  whataboutery  politics  1940s  russia  ussr 
august 2013 by jm
Mail from the (Velvet) Cybercrime Underground
Brian Krebs manages to thwart an attempted framing for possession of Silk Road heroin. bloody hell
silk-road  drugs  bitcoin  ecommerce  brian-krebs  crime  framed  cybercrime  russia  scary  law-enforcement 
july 2013 by jm
Russia's anti-child-porn internet blocklist allegedly being used for general censorship
Allegedly being used to censor political and anti-corruption journalism, and a Russian wikipedia-like site for hosting an article about suicide
censorship  feature-creep  russia  politics  blocklists 
february 2013 by jm
Ivan Beshoff, Last Survivor Of Mutiny on the Potemkin, founded Beshoffs
wow. there's a factoid! the "Beshoffs" chain of chippers in Dublin were founded by this historic figure, who died in 1987
factoids  beshoffs  chips  dublin  history  small-world  battleship-potemkin  russia 
january 2013 by jm
Australian VCE exam question accidentally includes photoshopped Battletech mech
File under New Aesthetic:
Exams for the popular History: Revolution subject were original supposed to include the artwork Storming the Winter palace on 25th October 1917 by Nikolai Kochergin, which depicts events during the October Revolution, which was instrumental in the larger Russian Revolution of 1917. When students opened their exam this morning they found an altered version of the work with what appear to be a large "BattleTech Marauder" robot aiding the rising revolutionaries in the background.
new-aesthetic  funny  photoshop  russia  1917  battletech  mechs  vcaa 
november 2012 by jm
WikiLeaks Archive: A CAUCASUS WEDDING
Dagestan knows how to party. 'The main activity of the day was eating and drinking -- starting from 4 p.m., about eight hours worth, all told -- punctuated, when all were laden with food and sodden with drink, with a bout of jet skiing in the Caspian'
russia  government  politics  leaks  wikileaks  weddings  funny  dagestan  caucasus  from delicious
november 2010 by jm
Spam King Leo Kuvayev Jailed on Child Sex Charges — Krebs on Security
'A man known as one of the world’s top purveyors of junk e-mail has been imprisoned in Russia for allegedly molesting [more than *50*] underage girls from a Moscow orphanage, KrebsOnSecurity.com has learned.' lovely
spam  russia  jail  crime  moscow  leo-kuvayev  from delicious
august 2010 by jm
Russian watch RAKETA 24 hour white dial. Polar design. on eBay
24-hour analog CCCP-era Raketa watches. want. almost definitely fake going by the price, but still very nifty (via adampsyche)
russia  raketa  watches  analog  want  24-hour  via:adampsyche  from delicious
june 2010 by jm
Cybercrime Organizations Turn to ‘Mafia-Style’ Structure
good research coming out of McAfee -- lots of Eastern European, Russian, and ex-USSR-country cybercrime businesses nowadays, apparently
spam  scams  scareware  russia  eastern-europe  ukraine  romania  credit-cards  antivirus  mcafee  security  phishing  from delicious
october 2009 by jm

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