jm + regulation   23

Fireside Chat with Vint Cerf & Marc Andreessen (Google Cloud Next '17) - YouTube
In which Vint Cerf calls for regulatory oversight of software engineering. "It's a serious issue now"
vint-cerf  gcp  regulation  oversight  politics  law  reliability  systems 
9 days ago by jm
Online security won’t improve until companies stop passing the buck to the customer
100% agreed!
Giving good security advice is hard because very often individuals have little or no effective control over their security. The extent to which a customer is at risk of being defrauded largely depends on how good their bank’s security is, something customers cannot know.

Similarly, identity fraud is the result of companies doing a poor job at verifying identity. If a criminal can fraudulently take out a loan using another’s name, address, and date of birth from the public record, that’s the fault of the lender – not, as Cifas, a trade organisation for lenders, claims, because customers “don’t take the same care to protect our most important asset – our identities”.
cifas  uk  passwords  security  regulation  banking  ncsc  riscs  advice 
15 days ago by jm
The Forgotten Story Of The Radium Girls
'The radium girls’ case was one of the first in which an employer was made responsible for the health of the company’s employees. It led to life-saving regulations and, ultimately, to the establishment of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, which now operates nationally in the United States to protect workers. Before OSHA was set up, 14,000 people died on the job every year; today, it is just over 4,500. The women also left a legacy to science that has been termed “invaluable.”'
osha  health  safety  radium  poisoning  regulation  history  us-politics  free-market  cancer  radiation 
16 days ago by jm
Schneier on Automatic Face Recognition and Surveillance
When we talk about surveillance, we tend to concentrate on the problems of data collection: CCTV cameras, tagged photos, purchasing habits, our writings on sites like Facebook and Twitter. We think much less about data analysis. But effective and pervasive surveillance is just as much about analysis. It's sustained by a combination of cheap and ubiquitous cameras, tagged photo databases, commercial databases of our actions that reveal our habits and personalities, and ­-- most of all ­-- fast and accurate face recognition software.

Don't expect to have access to this technology for yourself anytime soon. This is not facial recognition for all. It's just for those who can either demand or pay for access to the required technologies ­-- most importantly, the tagged photo databases. And while we can easily imagine how this might be misused in a totalitarian country, there are dangers in free societies as well. Without meaningful regulation, we're moving into a world where governments and corporations will be able to identify people both in real time and backwards in time, remotely and in secret, without consent or recourse.

Despite protests from industry, we need to regulate this budding industry. We need limitations on how our images can be collected without our knowledge or consent, and on how they can be used. The technologies aren't going away, and we can't uninvent these capabilities. But we can ensure that they're used ethically and responsibly, and not just as a mechanism to increase police and corporate power over us.
privacy  regulation  surveillance  bruce-schneier  faces  face-recognition  machine-learning  ai  cctv  photos 
october 2015 by jm
The price of the Internet of Things will be a vague dread of a malicious world
So the fact is that our experience of the world will increasingly come to reflect our experience of our computers and of the internet itself (not surprisingly, as it’ll be infused with both). Just as any user feels their computer to be a fairly unpredictable device full of programs they’ve never installed doing unknown things to which they’ve never agreed to benefit companies they’ve never heard of, inefficiently at best and actively malignant at worst (but how would you now?), cars, street lights, and even buildings will behave in the same vaguely suspicious way. Is your self-driving car deliberately slowing down to give priority to the higher-priced models? Is your green A/C really less efficient with a thermostat from a different company, or it’s just not trying as hard? And your tv is supposed to only use its camera to follow your gestural commands, but it’s a bit suspicious how it always offers Disney downloads when your children are sitting in front of it. None of those things are likely to be legal, but they are going to be profitable, and, with objects working actively to hide them from the government, not to mention from you, they’ll be hard to catch.
culture  bots  criticism  ieet  iot  internet-of-things  law  regulation  open-source  appliances 
september 2015 by jm
EPA opposed rules that would have exposed VW's cheating
[...] Two months ago, the EPA opposed some proposed measures that would help potentially expose subversive code like the so-called “defeat device” software VW allegedly used by allowing consumers and researchers to legally reverse-engineer the code used in vehicles. EPA opposed this, ironically, because the agency felt that allowing people to examine the software code in vehicles would potentially allow car owners to alter the software in ways that would produce more emissions in violation of the Clean Air Act. The issue involves the 1998 Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DCMA), which prohibits anyone from working around “technological protection measures” that limit access to copyrighted works. The Library of Congress, which oversees copyrights, can issue exemptions to those prohibitions that would make it legal, for example, for researchers to examine the code to uncover security vulnerabilities.
dmca  volkswagen  vw  law  code  open-source  air-quality  diesel  cheating  regulation  us-politics 
september 2015 by jm
Why Canada should de-activate Uber
The Uber controversy is not just—or even mainly—a technology story, it’s fundamentally a deregulation story; the story of a uniquely American fundamentalist free-market worldview being sold to us in the name of “car-sharing” and innovation.
uber  free-market  libertarian  taxis  regulation  canada  cities 
november 2014 by jm
UK's ICO spam regulator even more toothless now
We appealed this decision, but on June 2014 the Upper Tribunal agreed with the First-tier Tribunal, cancelling our monetary penalty notice against Niebel and McNeish, and largely rendering our power to issue fines for breaches of PECR involving spam texts redundant.


This is pretty terrible. The UK appears to have the weakest anti-spam regime in Europe due to the lack of powers given to ICO.
ico  anti-spam  uk  law  regulation  spam  sms 
september 2014 by jm
SI336 - current Irish anti-spam law
"European Communities (Electronic Communications Networks and Services) (Privacy and Electronic Communications) Regulations 2011". Spam is covered under 13.1, "Unsolicited communications", on page 16 of this PDF
spam  anti-spam  law  ireland  eu  ec  sms  email  si336  privacy  regulation 
september 2014 by jm
The Broadcasting Association of Ireland and the NUJ agree: the internet must be regulated so that it can be 'brought into line'
'The Irish Times podcast ends with both the NUJ’s Seamus Dooley and Prof Kenny agreeing that somebody must regulate the internet so that it can be brought into line.'
regulation  ireland  law  dangerous  nuj  bai  journalism  censorship 
august 2014 by jm
Nanex: "The stock market is rigged" [by HFTs]
All this evidence points to one inescapable conclusion: the order cancellations and trade executions just before, and during the trader's order were not a coincidence. This is premeditated, programmed theft, plain and simple. Michael Lewis probably said it best when he told 60 Minutes that the stock market is rigged.


Nanex have had enough, basically. Mad stuff.
hft  stocks  finance  market  trading  nanex  60-minutes  michael-lewis  scams  sec  regulation  low-latency  exploits  hacks 
july 2014 by jm
Russia passes bill requiring bloggers to register with government
A bill passed by the Russian parliament on Tuesday says that any blogger read by at least 3,000 people a day has to register with the government telecom watchdog and follow the same rules as those imposed by Russian law on mass media. These include privacy safeguards, the obligation to check all facts, silent days before elections and loose but threatening injunctions against "abetting terrorism" and "extremism."


Russian blogging platforms have responded by changing view-counter tickers to display "2500+" as a max.
russia  blogs  blogging  terrorism  extremism  internet  regulation  chilling-effects  censorship 
april 2014 by jm
We're sending out the wrong signals in bid to lure the big data bucks - Independent.ie
Simon McGarr on Ireland's looming data-protection train-crash.
Last week, during the debate of his proposals to increase fees for making a Freedom of Information request, Brendan Howlin was asked how one of his amendments would affect citizens looking for data from the State's electronic databases. His reply was to cheerfully admit he didn't even understand the question. "I have no idea what an SQL code is. Does anyone know what an SQL code is?"

Unlike the minister, it probably isn't your job to know that SQL is the computer language that underpins the data industry. The amendment he had originally proposed would have effectively allowed civil servants to pretend that their computer files were made of paper when deciding whether a request was reasonable. His answer showed how the Government could have proposed such an absurd idea in the first place.

Like it or not – fair or not – these are not the signals a country that wanted to build a long-term data industry would choose to send out. They are the sort of signals that Ireland used to send out about Financial Regulation. I think it's agreed, that approach didn't work out so well.
foi  ireland  brendan-howlin  technology  illiteracy  sql  civil-service  government  data-protection  privacy  regulation  dpa 
december 2013 by jm
Column: The Loyaltybuild breach shows it’s time to take data protection seriously
What is afoot here is a rerun of the Celtic Tiger era “light touch regulation” of financial services. Ireland has again made a Faustian pact whereby we lure employers here on the understanding that they will not subject to too-stringent a regulatory system. As the Loyaltybuild breach has shown, this is a bargain that will probably end badly. And as with the financial services boom, it is making the Germans nervous.
Perhaps we will listen to them this time.
fergal-crehan  loyaltybuild  celtic-tiger  ireland  dpa  regulation  data-protection  privacy  credit-cards 
november 2013 by jm
European ruling raises questions over liability and online comment
'A recent ruling by the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) has called into question [...] the liability of media organisations for online comment.' Delfi, a news website in Estonia, found liable for a user's comments by the ECHR
echr  comments  news  web  law  regulation  estonia  delfi  liability  slander  defamation 
november 2013 by jm
ICO’s Tame Investigation Of Google Street View Data Slurping
“People will yet again be asking whether Google has been let off without the kind of full and rigorous investigation that you would expect after this kind of incident,” Nick Pickles, director of the Big Brother Watch, told TechWeekEurope. “Let’s not forget that information was collected without permission from thousands of people’s Wi-Fi networks, in a way that if an individual had done so they would have almost certainly have been prosecuted. It seems strange that ICO [the UK's Data Protection regulatory agency] did not want to inspect the [datacenter] cages housing the data, while it is also troubling that Google’s assurances were taken at face value, despite this not being the first incident where consumers have seen their privacy violated by the company.”
privacy  google  ico  regulation  data-protection  snooping  wifi  sniffing  network-traffic  street-view 
july 2013 by jm
Merkel call for data protection rules puts Ireland in spotlight - Technology News
Irish Times on EU unhappiness with Ireland's "light touch" data protection regime:
Hawkes’s appearance last month on RTÉ’s Morning Ireland regarding the US Prism surveillance programme, since posted to YouTube, reheated lingering resentment among many European data authorities. His admission that he “knew in a general way” about such programmes and didn’t “regard this particular revelation as particularly new” was a red rag to his European colleagues who fear Ireland is the transmission point of wholesale EU data to the US.
eu  ireland  data-protection  privacy  billy-hawkes  regulation  dpc 
july 2013 by jm
Latest leak of EU Data Protection Regulation makes fines impossible
Well, isn't this convenient. The leaked proposed regulation document from the Irish EU presidency contains the following changes from current law:
what is new is a set of prescriptive conditions which, if adopted, appears to make a Monetary Penalty Notice (MPN) almost impracticable to serve. This is because the [Data Protection] Commissioner would have consider a dozen factors (many of which will give no doubt rise to appeal). [...]

In addition, the fines in the Regulation require consideration of the actual damage caused; this compares unfavourably with the current MPN where large fines have been contingent on grave security errors on the part of the data controller (i.e. the MPN of the UK DPA does not need damage to data subjects – only the likelihood of substantial distress or damage which should have been preventable/foreseeable).
data-protection  law  eu  ec  ireland  privacy  fines  regulation  mpn 
june 2013 by jm
LobbyPlag
wow, great view of which MEPs are eviscerating the EU's data protection regime:
Currently the EU is negotiating about new data privacy laws. This new EU Regulation will replace all existing national laws on data privacy. Here you can see a general overview which Members of the European Parliament (MEPs) are pushing for more or less data privacy. Choose a country, a political group or a MEP from the “Top 10” list to find out more.
europe  eu  privacy  data-protection  datap  ec  regulation  meps 
june 2013 by jm
Council of the European Union Releases Draft Compromise Text on the Proposed EU Data Protection Regulation
Oh god. this sounds like an impending privacy and anti-spam disaster. "business-focussed":
Overall, the [Irish EC Presidency’s] draft compromise text can be seen as a more business-focused, pragmatic approach. For example, the Presidency has drafted an additional recital (Recital 3a), clarifying the right to data protection as a qualified right, highlighting the principle of proportionality and importance of other competing fundamental rights, including the freedom to conduct a business.


and some pretty serious relaxation of how consent for use of personal data is measured:

The criterion for valid consent is amended from “explicit” to “unambiguous,” except in the case of processing special categories of data (i.e., sensitive personal data) (Recital 25 and Article 9(2)). This reverts to the current position under the Data Protection Directive and is a concession to the practical difficulty of obtaining explicit consent in all cases.

The criteria for valid consent are further relaxed by the ability to obtain consent in writing, orally or in an electronic manner, and where technically feasible and effective, valid consent can be given using browser settings and other technical solutions. Further, the requirement that the controller bear the burden of proof that valid consent was obtained is limited to a requirement that the controller be able to “demonstrate” that consent was obtained (Recital 32 and Article 7(1)). The need for “informed” consent is also relaxed from the requirement to provide the full information requirements laid out in Article 14 to the minimal requirements that the data subject “at least” be made aware of: (1) the identity of the data controller, and (2) the purpose(s) of the processing of their personal data (Recitals 33 and 48).
anti-spam  privacy  data-protection  spam  ireland  eu  ec  regulation 
june 2013 by jm
So now you know who gets some of those excessive Ticketmaster fees….
Interesting evidence; it appears Irish music promoters are getting "rebates" from the massive TicketMaster "booking fee", on each ticket sold. This sounds like a cartel to me, and we need to regulate this. Where is the National Consumer Agency and Competition Authority?
The matter is something which should be of concern to every gig-going music fan, regardless of whether they go to Stradbally or not. For years, many have asked about TicketMaster's quasi-monopoly position in the marketplace and why this is so. We’ve always been told that promoters preferred to deal with one company rather than several and that TM’s systems and nationwide reach yadda yadda yadda was the bees’ knees etc. Other companies have tried to compete but no-one has been able to beat TM at this game.

But why would promoters go elsewhere when they’re getting a slice of the TM fees back as rebates? Those past off-the-record attempts by and briefings from promoters blaming TM for those fees can now be seen as hypocritical. They’re sticking with TM because they’re receiving a take of the fees paid by punters who have no other choice in service provider if they want to get their hands on tickets. You wonder what the acts make of this cash-grab – perhaps some whip-smart agent is already making a claim for a percentage of the rebates because there would be no rebates in the first place without the act.

Surely this is an issue for the Competition Authority and National Consumers Association too, given the manner in which the rebates are made and TM’s deals with the promoters? While promoters under TM deals are free to sell a certain proportion of their tickets with another provider, it’s usually only a very small percentage of the total and unlikely to trouble TM’s bottom line. Also, given that the rebates are volume-driven, it’s better for the promoters to keep the largest possible chunk of their business with TM. It seems that we have a new suspect in the blame game about why ticket prices are so high.
regulation  ireland  cartels  competition  ticketing  tickets  ticketmaster  music  gigs  consumer 
april 2013 by jm
Senator Mark McSharry call Boards.ie and Politics.ie "subversive"
'we have Boards.ie and Politics.ie, for me frankly that doesn't amount to free speech what it amounts to is legalised subversion of the state. I think it's fundamentally wrong.' Incredible quote
boards  politics.ie  ireland  internet  seanad  regulation  subversion  mark-mcsharry  free-speech 
march 2012 by jm

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