jm + referenda   9

How Ireland’s Abortion Referendum Became a Test Case for Democracy in the Social Media Age
Exploring the "fake news" merchants attempting to subvert the Irish abortion referendum.
On 4chan, a number of users who identified as Irish attempted to infiltrate the online conversation and tarnish the pro-repeal campaign. Operation Zyklon encouraged users to spread awareness of a connection between Amnesty International Ireland and the philanthropist George Soros, who donated €137,000 to Amnesty’s My Body My Rights campaign in 2016. Operation Trojan Horse saw users sharing templates of fake pro-repeal posters with extreme captions such as, “There should be no limit on abortion up to birth”. Users were encouraged to print and spread these posters around college campuses and share them across social media. A particularly curious operation called Operation Drunken Monkey aimed to stifle student voter turnout by organizing club nights on May 24 in the hope that students would be too hungover to vote the following day.
4chan  repealthe8th  abortion  referenda  politics  fake-news  amnesty 
june 2018 by jm
How Ireland Beat Dark Ads – Foreign Policy
In practice, while these recognizable attempts to disrupt the democratic debate with microtargeted ads, bot activity, and misinformation were active, they appear to have been relatively ineffective and may even have turned voters away from those employing them.

Given the battleground online discourse has become in democracies across the world, this small country’s resistance to it may offer some cause for hope. The resilience offered by the small size and close-knit nature of the Irish electorate may be difficult to reproduce in larger democracies. But the active measures taken by media, volunteer groups, and campaigners against potentially corrosive techniques can be a powerful inspiration.


+1 -- it's heartening that we were able to defeat these 21st century dirty tricks after the damage they did with Trump and Brexit.
brexit  elections  trump  fake-news  propaganda  bots  dark-ads  facebook  social-media  repealthe8th  referenda  abortion  ireland  repeal-shield  twitter 
june 2018 by jm
‘Abroad For Yes' Helped Irish Voters Get Home for Abortion Referendum
This was one of the most amazing things I saw during the referendum campaign, alright! I had the pleasure of helping to fund several journeys home to vote:
Rebecca Wilson, one of the Abroad for Yes co-founders, said she and two other women, her sister Lauren Wilson and Hannah McNulty Madden, decided to launch the group when the referendum date was announced in late March. Wilson was visiting Helsinki, where Lauren and McNulty Madden are students.

After realizing Lauren and McNulty Madden weren’t eligible for a postal vote, they looked up the cost of flights and panicked. On Twitter, however, McNulty Madden noticed that people were expressing interest in helping people who wanted to go home to Ireland but couldn’t afford it. The women decided to set up the Abroad for Yes Facebook group as a community for supporters of repealing the eighth amendment to gather and find one another.

Wilson thought they’d help fund travel for maybe 10 people total, but in the first day of the group’s existence funded 5 trips, including for Lauren and McNulty Madden. After traveling back to Dublin, Wilson and the group continued to help others, enlisting three other group administrators. Wilson said they don’t have an exact figure, but she believes they’ve helped raise at least 30,000 euros.
ireland  repealthe8th  abortion  referenda  abroad-for-yes  t4y  facebook 
june 2018 by jm
A first draft of history
For journalists it is always easier to point to the politician with the pearly-white smile and the pithy sound-byte as the harbinger of change – they attract the cameras and the microphones and make us turn our backs on the truth. It’s like we cannot – or will not – believe that change can be brought about by ordinary people doing extraordinary things, no matter how often we see it. It’s like we need the fallacy that our leaders are somehow better than us, somehow in control to sleep safely at night, when in fact much of our insomnia and worry is their creation.

My first draft of history is this:

“On Friday May 25 2018, the women of Ireland repealed the Eighth Amendment.”

And that’s it.

It may have taken them 35 years, and in that time they were scorned and laughed at and belittled and abused, right up until Saturday morning and in some cases beyond, and yet they did it. Nothing else is relevant.

Through the day I saw women, from teenagers who had just cast their first vote to political veterans who started out on this trail 35 years previously, gradually realising what they had done.

One by one, it dawned on them the immense power that they now wield.

They banded together, and over the weeks and months and years, they changed a country.

And they’re not done yet.


Amen to that. Resist the rewriting of history -- this was a revolutionary moment for Ireland, and in some ways, the world.
ireland  history  repealthe8th  abortion  referenda  journalism 
may 2018 by jm
Archiving the 8th
'archiving & collecting the 2018 referendum':
This site was set up as a voluntary effort to answer some of these questions, and to quickly compile information on all known archiving and collecting activities happening nationwide, on both sides of the referendum campaign. It’s still very much a work in progress but the aspirations include:

to provide an immediate, temporary resource to consolidate information on who’s archiving the 8th, and offer contact details
share resources and suggestions, particularly for people wishing to donate material
identify potential gaps or opportunities in collecting
support networking of folks around the country engaged in archiving the 8th
share models of protocols and examples of other ‘rapid response’ collecting elsewhere
repealthe8th  history  archives  archival  2018  referenda 
may 2018 by jm
"Mudslinging" campaigns drive down voting rates, particularly among the unsure
Does negative campaigning influence the likelihood of voting in elections? Our study of U.S. Senate campaigns indicates the answer is “yes.” We find that people distinguish between useful negative information presented in an appropriate manner and irrelevant and harsh mudslinging. As the proportion of legitimate criticisms increases in campaigns, citizens become more likely to cast ballots. When campaigns degenerate into unsubstantiated and shrill attacks, voters tend to stay home. Finally, we find that individuals vary in their sensitivity to the tenor of campaigns. In particular, the tone is more consequential for independents, for those with less interest in politics, and for those with less knowledge about politics.


(via Mark Dennehy)
politics  strategy  ireland  referenda  via:markdennehy  dirty-tricks 
may 2018 by jm
"Facebook will implement a part of their transparency plan"
The Transparent Referendum Initiative writes:
Big News - Facebook will implement a part of their transparency plan - the ability to see the ads that a page has paid for- IN IRELAND FROM 25th. A positive first step. This will help us build out our database, as we wait for a platform fed offline list to be implemented. #8thRef
facebook  ads  transparency  ireland  repealthe8th  referenda  voting 
april 2018 by jm
Can the United Kingdom government legally disregard a vote for Brexit?
Oh thank god, there's a "get out of jail" card before they destroy the global economy to appease the eurosceptics.
On the day after a vote for Brexit, the UK will still be a member state of the EU. All the legislation which gives effect to EU law will still be in place. Nothing as a matter of law changes in any way just because of a vote to Leave. What will make all the legal difference is not a decision to leave by UK voters in a non-binding advisory vote, but the decision of the prime minister on how to react before making any Article 50 notification. And what the prime minister will do politically after a referendum vote for Brexit is, at the moment, as unknown as the result of the result of the referendum itself.
brexit  law  uk  government  referenda  eurosceptics  eu 
june 2016 by jm
Ireland will need referendum to create EU court for patents
omg. Sean "Irish SOPA" Sherlock dealing with the important issues once again -- in this case the bloody "Unified Patent Court"
patents  eu  sean-sherlock  absurd  referenda  ireland  ip 
may 2016 by jm

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