jm + red-hat   4

Red Hat on rkt vs Docker
This is like watching a train-wreck in slow motion on Groundhog Day. We, in the broader Linux and open source community, have been down this path multiple times over the past fifteen years, specifically with package formats. While there needs to be room for experimentation, having two incompatible specs driven by two startups trying to differentiate and in direct competition is *not* a good thing. It would be better for the community and for everyone who depends on our collective efforts if CoreOS and Docker collaborated on a standardized common spec, image format, and distribution protocol. To this end, we at Red Hat will continue to contribute to both initiatives with the goal of driving convergence.
rkt  docker  appc  coreos  red-hat  dpkg  rpm  linux  packaging  collaboration  open-source 
may 2015 by jm
Performance Co-Pilot
System performance metrics framework, plugged by Netflix, open-source for ages
open-source  pcp  performance  system  metrics  ops  red-hat  netflix 
february 2015 by jm
Systemd: Harbinger of the Linux apocalypse
While there are many defensible aspects of Systemd, other aspects boggle the mind. Not the least of these was that, as of a few months ago, trying to debug the kernel from the boot line would cause the system to crash. This was because of Systemd's voracious logging and the fact that Systemd responds to the "debug" flag on the kernel boot line -- a flag meant for the kernel, not anything else. That, straight up, is a bug.

However, the Systemd developers didn't see it that way and actively fought with those experiencing the problem. Add the fact that one of the Systemd developers was banned by Linus Torvalds for poor attitude and bad design and another was responsible for causing significant issues with Linux audio support, but blamed the problem on everything else but his software, and you have a bad situation on your hands.

There's no shortage of egos in the open source development world. There's no shortage of new ideas and veteran developers and administrators pooh-poohing something new simply because it's new. But there are also 45 years of history behind Unix and extremely good reasons it's still flourishing. Tools designed like Systemd do not fit the Linux mold, to their own detriment. Systemd's design has more in common with Windows than with Unix -- down to the binary logging.


The link re systemd consuming the "debug" kernel boot arg is a canonical example of inflexible coders refusing to fix their own bugs. (via Jason Dixon)
systemd  linux  red-hat  egos  linus-torvalds  unix  init  booting  debugging  logging  design  software  via:obfuscurity 
august 2014 by jm
East Texas Judge Says Mathematical Algorithms Can’t Be Patented, Dismisses Uniloc Claim Against Rackspace
This seems pretty significant. Is the tide turning in the Texas Eastern District against patent trolls, at last? And does it establish sufficient precedent?

A federal judge has thrown out a patent claim against Rackspace, ruling that mathematical algorithms can’t be patented. The ruling in the Eastern Disrict stemmed from a 2012 complaint filed by Uniloc USA asserting that processing of floating point numbers by the Linux operating system was a patent violation.

Chief Judge Leonard Davis based the ruling on U.S. Supreme Court case law that prohibits the patenting of mathematical algorithms. According to Rackspace, this is the first reported instance in which the Eastern District of Texas has granted an early motion to dismiss finding a patent invalid because it claimed unpatentable subject matter.

Red Hat, which supplies Linux to Rackspace, provided Rackspace’s defense. Red Hat has a policy of standing behind customers through its Open Source Assurance program.


See https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=5455869 for more discussion.
east-texas  patents  swpats  maths  patenting  law  judges  rackspace  linux  red-hat  uniloc-usa  floating-point 
march 2013 by jm

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