jm + reading   18

How Google Book Search Got Lost – Backchannel
There are plenty of other explanations for the dampening of Google’s ardor: The bad taste left from the lawsuits. The rise of shiny and exciting new ventures with more immediate payoffs. And also: the dawning realization that Scanning All The Books, however useful, might not change the world in any fundamental way.
books  reading  google  library  lawsuits  legal  scanning  book-search  search 
april 2017 by jm
Google - Site Reliability Engineering
The Google SRE book is now online, for free
sre  google  ops  books  reading 
january 2017 by jm
Before the World Forgets Antarctica's First Great Author: The Fascinating Life and Death of Nick Johnson
RIP. "Big Dead Place" is a fantastic document of "M*A*S*H on ice", as the London Times called it, and one of my favourite books. See also http://feralhouse.com/nick-johnson-rip/ for another eulogy from his publishers
big-dead-place  nick-johnson  rip  eulogies  books  reading  history  antarctica  exploration  raytheon  bureaucracy 
may 2016 by jm
Review: Site Reliability Engineering
John "lusis" Vincent reviews the SRE book, not 100% positively
sre  books  reading  reviews  lusis 
april 2016 by jm
Dan Luu reviews the Site Reliability Engineering book
voluminous! still looks great, looking forward to reading our copy (via Tony Finch)
via:fanf  books  reading  devops  ops  google  sre  dan-luu 
april 2016 by jm
Writing Minecraft Plugins - The Book
wow, Walter Higgins' book (from Peachpit Press) is looking great
books  reading  minecraft  walter-higgins  javascript 
april 2015 by jm
Working Time, Knowledge Work and Post-Industrial Society: Unpredictable Work - Aileen O'Carroll
my friend Aileen has written a book -- looks interesting:

I will argue that a key feature of working time within high-tech industries is unpredictability, which alters the way time is experienced and perceived. It affects all aspects of time, from working hours to work organisation, to career, to the distinction between work and life. Although many desire variety in work and the ability to control working hours, unpredictability causes dissatisfaction.


On Amazon.co.uk at: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Working-Time-Knowledge-Post-Industrial-Society-ebook/dp/B00VILIN4U
books  reading  time  work  society  tech  working-hours  job  life  sociology 
april 2015 by jm
Services Engineering Reading List
good list of papers/articles for fans of scalability etc.
architecture  papers  reading  reliability  scalability  articles  to-read 
march 2015 by jm
How Videogames Like Minecraft Actually Help Kids Learn to Read | WIRED

I analyzed several chunks of The Ultimate Player's Guide using the Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease scale, and they scored from grade 8 to grade 11. Yet in my neighborhood they're being devoured by kids in the early phases of elementary school. Games, it seems, can motivate kids to read—and to read way above their level. This is what Constance Steinkuehler, a games researcher at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, discovered. She asked middle and high school students who were struggling readers (one 11th-grade student read at a 6th-grade level) to choose a game topic they were interested in, and then she picked texts from game sites for them to read—some as difficult as first-year-college language. The kids devoured them with no help and nearly perfect accuracy.

How could they do this? “Because they're really, really motivated,” Steinkuehler tells me. It wasn't just that the students knew the domain well; there were plenty of unfamiliar words. But they persisted more because they cared about the task. “It's situated knowledge. They see a piece of language, a turn of phrase, and they figure it out.”


When my kids are playing Minecraft, there's a constant stream of "how do you spell X?" as they craft nametags for their pets. It's great!
minecraft  gaming  kids  education  spelling  school  reading  literacy 
october 2014 by jm
Google's Influential Papers for 2013
Googlers across the company actively engage with the scientific community by publishing technical papers, contributing open-source packages, working on standards, introducing new APIs and tools, giving talks and presentations, participating in ongoing technical debates, and much more. Our publications offer technical and algorithmic advances, feature aspects we learn as we develop novel products and services, and shed light on some of the technical challenges we face at Google. Below are some of the especially influential papers co-authored by Googlers in 2013.
google  papers  toread  reading  2013  scalability  machine-learning  algorithms 
july 2014 by jm
The Hands That Made The Moomins
lovely New Yorker writeup on Tove Jansson, author of those beautiful children's books
tove-jansson  moomins  books  childrens-books  reading  literature  via:etienneshrdlu 
march 2014 by jm
The Hole in Our Collective Memory: How Copyright Made Mid-Century Books Vanish - Rebecca J. Rosen - The Atlantic
A book published during the presidency of Chester A. Arthur has a greater chance of being in print today than one published during the time of Reagan.
This is not a gently sloping downward curve. Publishers seem unwilling to sell their books on Amazon for more than a few years after their initial publication. The data suggest that publishing business models make books disappear fairly shortly after their publication and long before they are scheduled to fall into the public domain. Copyright law then deters their reappearance as long as they are owned. On the left side of the graph before 1920, the decline presents a more gentle time-sensitive downward sloping curve.
business  books  legal  copyright  law  public-domain  reading  history  publishers  amazon  papers 
september 2013 by jm
Comics For Children…. a visual list…. | The Forbidden Planet International Blog
some great recommendations here. Hildafolk has been popular with my 5-year-old, must pick up a few more
comics  kids  children  books  reading  library  toget  toread 
july 2013 by jm
Bunnie Huang's "Hacking the Xbox" now available as a free PDF
'No Starch Press and I have decided to release this free ebook version of Hacking the Xbox in honor of Aaron Swartz. As you read this book, I hope that you’ll be reminded of how important freedom is to the hacking community and that you’ll be inclined to support the causes that Aaron believed in.

I agreed to release this book for free in part because Aaron’s treatment by MIT is not unfamiliar to me. In this book, you will find the story of when I was an MIT graduate student, extracting security keys from the original Microsoft Xbox. You’ll also read about the crushing disappointment of receiving a letter from MIT legal repudiating any association with my work, effectively leaving me on my own to face Microsoft.

The difference was that the faculty of my lab, the AI laboratory, were outraged by this treatment. They openly defied MIT legal and vowed to publish my work as an official “AI Lab Memo,” thereby granting me greater negotiating leverage with Microsoft. Microsoft, mindful of the potential backlash from the court of public opinion over suing a legitimate academic researcher, came to a civil understanding with me over the issue.'

This is a classic text on hardware reverse-engineering and the freedom to tinker -- strongly recommended.
hacking  bunnie-huang  xbox  free  hardware  drm  freedom-to-tinker  books  reading  mit  microsoft  history 
march 2013 by jm
Ingenious Dublin
Excellent stuff, by Mary Mulvihill:

Where in Dublin can you see a Victorian diving bell? What about the skeleton of Tommy, the prince’s elephant? The site of the world’s first earthquake experiment? Or the world’s sports pirate radio broadcast? Our new e-book Ingenious Dublin has all these fascinating stories and more. It is packed with information, places to visit, and lots of illustrations, and covers the city and county, from Skerries windmills to Ballybetagh’s fossil deer.'


EUR 4.99 for the Kindle e-book. I'll buy that!
kindle  reading  books  mary-mulvihill  science  facts  dublin  ireland  history 
october 2012 by jm
Today's Guardian
Phil Gyford reworks the Grauniad's website using their open content API. I really like the navigation and just-the-text nature, but I still feel a need to know what other articles are "nearby", which this doesn't quite provide. Still, excellent work
phil-gyford  news  newspapers  gu  guardian  design  usability  reading  readability  webdesign  from delicious
june 2010 by jm

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