jm + radio   7

TV detector vans may have been a con all along
This is shaking my world view -- although I find it more plausible that (as responses to https://www.theguardian.com/notesandqueries/query/0,5753,-22440,00.html claim) they _did_ work until about 10-20 years ago, by detecting RF emissions from the local oscillator inside the TV.

Ross Anderson, at https://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/~rja14/Papers/SE-15.pdf , notes:

During [..] World War II, radio engineering saw advances in radar, passive direction
finding, and low-probability-of-intercept techniques, which I’ll discuss in the next
chapter. By the 1960s, the stray RF leaking from the local oscillator signals in domestic
television sets was being targeted by direction-finding equipment in “TV detector
vans,” in Britain, where TV owners must pay an annual license fee that is supposed to
support public broadcast services. Its use has since expanded to satellite and cable TV
operators, who use detector vans to find pirate decoders. Some people in the computer
security community were also aware that information could leak from cross-coupling
and stray RF (see, for example, [259, 791]).
rf  radio  tv  bbc  tv-licenses  tv-license-detector-vans  security  emissions  tempest 
august 2016 by jm
GSMem: Data Exfiltration from Air-Gapped Computers over GSM Frequencies
Holy shit.
Air-gapped networks are isolated, separated both logically and physically from public networks. Although the feasibility of invading such systems has been demonstrated in recent years, exfiltration of data from air-gapped networks is still a challenging task. In this paper we present GSMem, a malware that can exfiltrate data through an air-gap over cellular frequencies. Rogue software on an infected target computer modulates and transmits electromagnetic signals at cellular frequencies by invoking specific memory-related instructions and utilizing the multichannel memory architecture to amplify the transmission. Furthermore, we show that the transmitted signals can be received and demodulated by a rootkit placed in the baseband firmware of a nearby cellular phone.
gsmem  gsm  exfiltration  air-gaps  memory  radio  mobile-phones  security  papers 
august 2015 by jm
BAI says Mooney Show was wrong to broadcast programme supporting same-sex marriage
This is a terrible decision. As Fintan O'Toole wrote afterwards: [The] 'BAI decision actually makes the point: a gay couple is a political "issue"; a straight couple is just a couple'
ireland  law  bai  radio  derek-mooney  same-sex-marriage  gay  equal-rights 
august 2014 by jm
We interrupt this program to warn the Emergency Alert System is hackable | Ars Technica
Private SSH key included in a firmware update. Oh dear:
The US Emergency Alert System, which interrupts live TV and radio broadcasts with information about national emergencies in progress, is vulnerable to attacks that allow hackers to remotely disseminate bogus reports and tamper with gear, security researchers warned. The remote takeover vulnerability affects the DASDEC-I and DASDEC-II application servers made by a company called Digital Alert Systems. It stems from the a recent firmware update that mistakenly included the private secure shell (SSH) key, according to an advisory published Monday by researchers from security firm IOActive. Administrators use such keys to remotely log in to a server to gain unfettered "root" access. The publication of the key makes it trivial for hackers to gain unauthorized access on Digital Alert System appliances that run default settings on older firmware. "An attacker who gains control of one or more DASDEC systems can disrupt these stations' ability to transmit and could disseminate false emergency information over a large geographic area," the IOActive advisory warned. "In addition, depending on the configuration of this and other devices, these messages could be forwarded and mirrored by other DASDEC systems."
ssh  security  fail  emergency  alert  warning  tv  radio 
july 2013 by jm
RFID "zapper" constructed from disposable camera
also, an RFID "jammer" to block reads of RFID chips within range. related: the Israeli govt is considering voting cards with RFID chips, apparently
rfid  via:risks  security  hardware  rf  radio  jamming  israel  from delicious
april 2010 by jm

Copy this bookmark:



description:


tags: