jm + productivity   9

We’ll Never Know Whether Monorepos Are Better
This makes sense to me where the monorepo-vs-polyrepo argument is concerned -- it's another religious war:
About six months after the project was declared “done” (but there was always more to do, more improvements to make to our homegrown dependency management solution), we had a retrospective meeting. The same engineers who had taken sides, for and against the project, were again assembled to discuss how it went.
One of the main opponents went first.

“Thank goodness we’re finally having this retrospective,” he said. “I think we can all see that this experiment has been a colossal failure and that it’s time for us to change course and roll back to monorepo.”
“What do you mean?” one of the main multirepo advocates replied. “This was one of the best decisions we’ve ever made!”

This really shocked me. We had access to all of the data you could possibly want to evaluate the decision. The same engineers working with the same codebase had seen what it was like in the monorepo model and the multirepo model. We knew exactly how much it had actually cost to switch. We had lived with the advantages and disadvantages of both models. But still we couldn’t come to an agreement.

That retrospective taught me to be humble in my ambitions to “improve” engineering productivity. There’s no way to measure productivity in software, so there’s no way to know whether controversial, expensive “productivity enhancing” projects actually deliver on their promise, even in hindsight.
monorepo  productivity  dev  engineering  coding  polyrepo 
6 weeks ago by jm
IMDB on automation, pt 2
Quotable: "how long can work on making a routine task more efficient before you're spending more time than you save?"
quotes  time  automation  hacks  life  imdb  productivity  efficiency 
july 2016 by jm
re:Work - The five keys to a successful Google team
We learned that there are five key dynamics that set successful teams apart from other teams at Google:
Psychological safety: Can we take risks on this team without feeling insecure or embarrassed?
Dependability: Can we count on each other to do high quality work on time?
Structure & clarity: Are goals, roles, and execution plans on our team clear?
Meaning of work: Are we working on something that is personally important for each of us?
Impact of work: Do we fundamentally believe that the work we’re doing matters?
teams  google  culture  work  management  productivity  hr 
november 2015 by jm
Defending Your Time
great post from Ross Duggan on avoiding developer burnout
coding  burnout  productivity  work 
october 2015 by jm
Let a 1,000 flowers bloom. Then rip 999 of them out by the roots
The Twitter tech-debt story.
Somewhere along the way someone decided that it would be easier to convert the Birdcage to use Pants which had since learned how to build Scala and to deal with a maven-style layout. However at some point prior Pants been open sourced in throw it over the wall fashion and picked up by a few engineers at other companies, such as Square and Foursquare and moved forward. In the meantime, again because there weren’t enough people who’s job it was to take care of these things, Science was still on the original internally developed version and had in fact evolved independently of the open source version. However by the time we wanted to move Birdcage onto Pants, the open source version had moved ahead so that’s the one the Birdcage folks chose.


(cries)
tech-debt  management  twitter  productivity  engineering  monorepo  build-systems  war-stories  dev 
september 2015 by jm
The open-office trend is destroying the workplace
Wow, where has this person been for the past 20 years that they haven't had to encounter this? I can only imagine having a private office, tbh.
my personal performance at work has hit an all-time low. Each day, my associates and I are seated at a table staring at each other, having an ongoing 12-person conversation from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.  It’s like being in middle school with a bunch of adults. Those who have worked in private offices for decades have proven to be the most vociferous and rowdy. They haven’t had to consider how their loud habits affect others, so they shout ideas at each other across the table and rehash jokes of yore. As a result, I can only work effectively during times when no one else is around, or if I isolate myself in one of the small, constantly sought-after, glass-windowed meeting rooms around the perimeter.
business  office  productivity  work  desks  open-plan 
january 2015 by jm
Russell91/sshrc
'bring your .bashrc, .vimrc, etc. with you when you ssh'. A really nice implementation of this idea (much nicer than my own version!)
hacks  productivity  ssh  remote  shell  sh  bash  via:johnke  home-directory  unix 
september 2014 by jm
Making Remote Work Work
very good, workable tips on how to remote-work effectively (both in the comments of this thread and the original article)
tips  productivity  collaboration  hn  via:lhl  remote-working  telecommuting  work 
february 2014 by jm
Cory Doctorow's working environment
hardware and software, specifically, and an Ubuntu/Thinkpad user. some good tips here, and well-written, naturally
cory-doctorow  geek  howto  lifehacks  ubuntu  productivity  tips  tools  from delicious
july 2010 by jm

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